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Márcia Mata Defends PhD Thesis in Biotechnology and Biosciences

Márcia Mata Defends PhD Thesis in Biotechnology and Biosciences | iBB | Scoop.it

Márcia Andreia Faria da Mata has defended her Ph D thesis in Biotechnology and Biosciences at Instituto Superior Técnico on the 9th May 2018. During the last years, and under the supervision of Cláudia Lobato Silva from SCERG-iBB and Prof. Marco Costa from Case Western Reserve University, Márcia has investigated how stem cell engineering can contribute to the development of angiogenic cell therapies for the management of ischemia. The title of her thesis is "Stem Cell Engineering Approaches Towards Angiogenic Cell Therapy for Ischemic Diseases”.

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Intracoronary Delivery of Human Mesenchymal/Stromal Stem Cells

Intracoronary Delivery of Human Mesenchymal/Stromal Stem Cells | iBB | Scoop.it

Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells have unique properties favorable to their use in clinical practice and have been studied for cardiac repair. However, these cells are larger than coronary microvessels and there is controversy about the risk of embolization and microinfarctions, which could jeopardize the safety and efficacy of intracoronary route for their delivery. The index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) is an invasive method for quantitatively assessing the coronary microcirculation status. In a recent publication in PlosOne, BERG-iBB researchers in collaboration with colleagues from the Department of Cardiology at Hospital de Santa Marta and from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at University of Lisbon have examined heart microcirculation in a swine model after intracoronary injection of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells with the index of microcirculatory resistance. Overall, the study provides definitive evidence of microcirculatory disruption upon intracoronary administration of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, in a large animal model closely resembling human cardiac physiology, function and anatomy.

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