iBB
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iBB
Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences
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Application of Perinatal Derivatives in Animal Models on Cutaneous Wound Healing

Application of Perinatal Derivatives in Animal Models on Cutaneous Wound Healing | iBB | Scoop.it

Many studies that apply PnD in pre-clinical cutaneous wound healing models show large variations in the choice of the animal species (e.g., large animals, rodents), the choice of diabetic or non-diabetic animals, the type of injury (full-thickness wounds, burns, radiation-induced wounds, skin flaps), the source and type of PnD (placenta, umbilical cord, fetal membranes, cells, secretomes, tissue extracts), the method of administration (topical application, intradermal/subcutaneous injection, intravenous or intraperitoneal injection, subcutaneous implantation), and the type of delivery systems (e.g., hydrogels, synthetic or natural biomaterials as carriers for transplanted cells, extracts or secretomes). In a collaborative work coordinated by Prof. Pedro Fonte under the COST Action SPRINT (CA17116), the Postdoc researcher Ana Macedo and Master student Francisca Mendes from BERG-iBB, provided a comprehensive and integrative overview of the application of PnD in wound healing to assess its efficacy in preclinical animal models. The review was published in Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology.

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Antitumour and Antiproliferative Effect of Xanthohumol-loaded PLGA Nanoparticles on Melanoma

Antitumour and Antiproliferative Effect of Xanthohumol-loaded PLGA Nanoparticles on Melanoma | iBB | Scoop.it

Cutaneous melanoma is the deadliest type of skin cancer and current treatment is still inadequate, with low patient survival rates. The use of polyphenols loaded into nanoparticles could potentially address the lack of efficacy of current therapy. In a collaborative work published in a special issue of the journal Materials, with researchers from the University of Porto, Pedro Fonte and Ana Macedo from BERG-iBB assessed the potential of xanthohumol-loaded nanoparticles to treat melanoma. Nanoparticles had a size of about 300 nm and a PdI of 0.259, while achieving a xanthohumol loading of about 90%. The viability study showed similar cytoxicity between the xanthohumol and xanthohumol-loaded nanoparticles at 48 h with the IC50 established at 10 µM.  The ultimate anti-melanoma effect emerged from an association between the viability, migration and macrophagic phenotype modulation. These results display the remarkable antitumour effect of the xanthohumol-loaded nanoparticles and are the first advance towards the application of a nanoformulation to deliver xanthohumol to reduce adverse effects by currently employed chemotherapeutics.

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