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South Africa Is Still Under Apartheid

"More than two decades after the end of apartheid in South Africa, Cape Town remains racially segregated, with many black residents living in substandard townships."

Matt Danielson's insight:
South Africa had a long history of issues ranging back to Colonialism, through apartheid, and today with government corruption and internal strife. The great inequality left behind after apartheid is a major issue in the country for many people. One way this has been addressed recently is with land redistribution, but this policy has faced much controversy especially since many have suggested the government being able to confiscate "white owned land"  without compensation and use for redistribution.
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Matt Manish's curator insight, May 2, 2018 11:26 PM
One can see from this video that Apartheid still exists in some parts of South Africa such as Cape Town. From the drone footage in this video, one can see how divided Cape Town's landscape is from a bird's eye view. You can see how the black community lives in the part of town that is made up of mainly shacks. Right next door, you can see that the white community lives in the suburbs with regular housing and lush trees located adjacently to the black community's village of shacks. It's not just the residential areas of Cape Town that is segregated. Even in the heart of the city, a real racial tension between blacks and whites can be sensed,. Resulting in the majority of the black community being less successful than the white community. One can clearly see that even though Apartheid has officially ended, the tension between blacks and whites still exists in this part of South Africa.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 9:34 PM
This video looks into the still segregated town of Cape Town, located in South Africa. Although it was racially segregated by apartheid in the 20th century, Apartheid was outlawed in 1994. Since then, it has been claimed that Cape Town has become more diverse. This is only true to some extent. Because of the apartheid, it was nearly impossible for Blacks and People of Color to get jobs in the city. Therefore, the different races now inhabit their own neighborhoods, however the segregation still lingers. In most white neighborhoods, they enjoy beautiful and safe lifestyles while the poorer neighbors can’t even afford running water or electricity. Tags: South Africa, Africa, race, ethnicity, neighborhood, urban, planning, drought, water, urban ecology.
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Who are the Yaifo tribe and where are the rest of the world's most remote societies?

Matt Danielson's insight:
It is mind blowing to me at times that there can still be isolated tribes and groups of people in today's world with no contact to the outside world and still living primitively. When you look at the vastness of environment barriers like for example massive  dense jungles it begins to make more sense. on another note the guy in the article is one serious thrill-seeker. Imagine being dropped off in an uncharted and dangerous environment, with no contact to outside world, and attempting to find a tribe that could still practice head hunting. Though this sounds horrifying even to me, at the same time I can understand the thrill of being one of the last people in mankind's history to discover and document a tribe. 
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Highly concentrated population distribution

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "

Matt Danielson's insight:
The area often referred to as the "Outback" of Australia is one of the most sparsely populated areas on the planet. Due to the harsh environment and lack of resources not many people live their at all with the exceptions being some scientist, anthropologist, and native aboriginal tribes. This environment to many   seems like a horrible, desolate place. Hence why it was a great setting for Mad Max to help Illustrate the gravity and desperateness of the situation. To people that know the land better there is a lot there and a vast array of species only found in the Outback. 
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brielle blais's curator insight, April 26, 2018 1:24 PM
This post shows how this physical geography and climate of a country can impact who lives where, and how crowded the actual livable places can be. The land in the yellow is very hot, dry, and mostly desert and rugged. It would be very difficult for anyone to actually live in this area, due do land that cannot be used for any agriculture, most likely very little water sources, and just plain hot. This means the density of livable cities is very high, giving Australia a unique demographic. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 2018 4:13 PM
This distribution of Australia's population should come to no surprise to people who have a vague idea of the continent's geography. The coastal areas are by far preferable to the desert areas of the continent's interior. A good example of how geography impacts population density and where people decide to live.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 10:20 PM
The population of Australia is highly concentrated at the coast. Only about two percent of the population lives in the yellow shaded area on the image present in the article. The reason for the middle of Australia being so lightly populated is because the harsh climates. Where most people do not live the climate resembles the Sahara desert, which is very dry, and lacks rainfall. While the coastal areas where most of the population is concentrated resembles climates like Brazil, California, and India. These climates that most people live are not as harsh on the human and better for agriculture, cattle and port cities are known to be economically more powerful and populated. Since they access to the sea is so imperative these days.
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Climate Comparison Maps

Climate Comparison Maps | Geography | Scoop.it

"Triton1982 makes maps by comparing each of the city's highest and lowest average temperatures against the Koppen classification system."

Matt Danielson's insight:
I found this very interesting. I always imagined Australia as a temperate cost with a vast dessert/prairie interior that was generally inhospitable. Though the interior part is true I learned that the coastal areas vary greatly in climate. This allows for a much more varied ecosystem in Australia than I ever imagined. 
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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, May 3, 2018 12:44 PM
This images shows how diverse Australia really is, they have climates similar to different cities all over the world. The southern coasts are similar to California, but the interior of the country is a desert, for such a small continent it has some of the most varying climates. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:23 PM
This is an interesting map that compares Australia's climate to that of other regions. By doing this, the artist clearly explains how vast Australia's climate truly is. Because of its size, it is possible to think that Australia would not have such a diverse climate. However, its regions are comparable to deserts, the tropics, and temperate zones.
Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 8:39 PM
This map makes it easier to understand the climate that is inside Australia. It is cool how every part of the country has its own unique climate. It also shows just how big Australia is and how crazy their climate can be. 
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Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers

Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers | Geography | Scoop.it
Many companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila to take advantage of workers who speak lightly accented English and are familiar with American culture.

 

The geography of globalization is epitomized by relentless change and marked by continual turnover.  Cultural and economic factors play significant roles in creating potential advantages for receiving outsourced jobs (whether that is beneficially long-term is another discussion). 

Matt Danielson's insight:
The familiarization of American culture in the Philippines along with their fluency in American sounding English gives them a big advantage in the customer service industry. These advantages along with the ability to keep cost low is leading to the Philippines overtaking India as the call center capital of the world.  This is another example of globalization at work, which has many benefits, but also negative effects like the loss of jobs in other countries, or the new found reliance on foreign markets. 
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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:27 PM

Companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila because there the workers speak a lightly accented English and are more familiar with American culture then they are over in India. This shows the maturation of the outsourcing buisness and shows the preference for American English.  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:41 PM

The fact that so many Filipinos speak English is an important one to understand. This brings jobs to the Philippines, but at the expense of local culture. High income and social standing in the Philippines is often correlated with English, as many of the high-ranking citizens attend universities in the United States and return with degrees, and in turn teach their children English. This marginalizes their own language in a way, and is something to keep aware of, as it's one thing that the United States does not face in many areas, that most other countries around the world do.  

 

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:16 PM

I was most shocked by how Americanized these individual were. I understand that the Philippines were under American control for a fair period of time, but the country obtained its sovereign independence of the US sometime in the mid-40s. They have had close to 80 years to develop their own history, yet the author mentioned the citizens were still watching shows like “Friends” and speaking American English better than other foreign English speakers. It just goes to show how a colony is permanently marked by their past. I am not entirely sure this is a good thing, but at least one positive that came out of the US’s impact is that in speaking more American English there are more call center jobs. As the article mentioned, the jobs helped their sluggish economy. Still, the only reason these jobs are being offered is due to the amount companies save. Not only do the companies avoid paying American workers, whose salary is much higher, the companies are also in an area with better infrastructure. So even though the article claims the companies paid more because the Philippine workers cost $50 more than those from India, they save money on overhead and have better satisfied customers! Looking at call centers from the company’s perspective shows that this former colony is just a pawn once again. Therefore, when we look at intent, globalization just becomes negative again.   

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Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats

Why 80% of Singaporeans live in government-built flats | Geography | Scoop.it
Lots of countries show off their public-housing projects, but few are quite as devoted to them as Singapore, where four-fifths of the permanent population live in subsidised units built by the government, most of them as owner-occupiers. The city-state’s suburbs bristle with HDB towers, painted calming pastel hues. This vast national housing system surprises visitors who think of Singapore as a low-tax hub for expatriate bankers and big multinationals. But HDB is a linchpin of economic and social policy and an anchor for the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP), which has led Singapore since independence. It is also a tantalising but tricky model for Singapore’s fast-urbanising neighbours to follow.
Matt Danielson's insight:
The amount of people that dont mind living in government homes, or even actually prefer it is  ind blowing to me as an America. The mix of a heavily capitalistic economy but heavily socially involved government is also very  different then the rest of the world. The economic boom in Singapore found around city centers calls for this mass need of compact housing. The Urban growth in Singapore continues to grow at rapid rates. 
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Mr Mac's curator insight, July 24, 2017 9:26 AM
Unit 4 - Political, Government; Unit 7 - Urban Spaces, housing, Urban Planning
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Why Genghis Khan was good for the planet | Environment | The Guardian

Why Genghis Khan was good for the planet | Environment | The Guardian | Geography | Scoop.it
Laying waste to land scrubbed 700m tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere
Matt Danielson's insight:
Genghis khan lead the Mongols to conquest and became the leader of one of the largest and  most dominant Empire ever. They helped set up the silk road with this conquest, but the mass amount of deaths they caused had other effects beside gaining them land. In Genghis Khans lifetime historians believe that the mongols were directly responsible for between 20 and 60 million deahts. The amount of people and live stock killed,along with farms destroyed and allowing trees to grow over them actually massively lowered humans carbon footprint on the earth. One could even argue Genghis Khans conquest was great for the environment. 
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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     

Matt Danielson's insight:
This is part of the reason China is able to keep labor costs so low. Without many safety regulations it is alot cheaper to have workers work in dangerous environments. Not only that but projects like quality of buildings also have less standards leading bto sub par materials being used. I wonder if the  Chinese people  see the lack of safety as worth it to have their economical boom. 
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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:37 PM

Based on the video and the safety of the Chinese workers they tame no precautions to staying safe. If they have this much lack of safety for themselves then how do they regard the safety of the people around them. As China is and has cities up and coming to mega cities with high rises and exponential expanding then how do they create their buildings? As fast as they went up and the city was created then how stable are their buildings?

Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 2018 12:06 PM
This mentality towards worker safety is why the United States cannot compete with Chinese labor costs. The blatant disregard for safety as seen in the video allows Chinese manufacturers and industry to focus on reaching as high a level of production as possible. In a way, workers are seen as expendable parts to the entire process. Combine that with the low wages paid to these workers have allowed the country to develop in an incredibly short period of time. By disregarding worker safety, China has a massive edge over more developed nations with strict worker safety regulations.
Matt Chapman's curator insight, April 26, 2018 12:31 PM
This video shows why China gets stuff done for so much cheaper than other countries in the world.  Worker safety and workplace safety is non-existent which is why jobs get done for so much cheaper in China.
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Inside Hong Kong’s cage homes

Hong Kong is the most expensive housing market in the world. It has been ranked as the least affordable housing market on Earth for eight years in a row, and the price per square foot seems to be only going up. The inflated prices are forcing Hongkongers to squeeze into unconventionally small spaces that can affect their quality of life.
Matt Danielson's insight:
I thought high property values were bad in areas of California or in New York city, but Hong Kong seems far worse. The city is extremely overcrowded and people are desperate enough to work in the city for a better income, even if it means sleeping in a tiny cage apartment at night. 
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India-Pakistan border Ceremony

Fascinating footage of a traditional ceremony that takes place on the Pakistan India border. From the BBC
Matt Danielson's insight:
This event is interesting. Its almost reminds of me of two football teams staring each other down and chanting before a football game.  There is alot of tension between the two countries and some thing there is always a lingering possibility of war. This can seem to some as a way to be macho and "battle" without actually going to war. 
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Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:32 PM

whether or not this incites nationalism in a poor way, i think it is a good thing. no nationalism is a very detrimental thing to a country, i believe that this does benefit both countries in a way, maybe not as far as relations between the two countries but internally having love for your own country.

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 2018 5:51 PM
This video shows a ceremony that takes place on the India-Pakistan border and how precisely things need to be done to keep the peace. The two flags are lowered at a slow pace to ensure they are being lowered at the same pace, for if one were to be lowered before the other it could cause an international dispute. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 2018 8:20 PM
This is a really interesting display of hyper-nationalism and masculinity that has been taking place at the India-Pakistan border for years. On the surface, it seems like simply an entertaining, friendly competition. However, many are concerned that this tradition does nothing but enforce the tension between the two countries.
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Too Many Men

Too Many Men | Geography | Scoop.it

"Nothing like this has happened in human history. A combination of cultural preferences, government decree and modern medical technology in the world’s two largest countries has created a gender imbalance on a continental scale. Men outnumber women by 70 million in China and India."

Matt Danielson's insight:
This is interesting, and brings up an issue that is new to many countries. In past it would be rare for a nation to have to many men (though it did happen more often the problem was lack of men due to death in war or death at grueling careers). Today in India and especially China the men are drastically outnumber the women. This has with modern medicine and better access to resources enabling a higher birthrate, and cultural reasons. In the case of China especially this also has to do with government policy and control over the population during the one child time period, making people have only one child led to mostly males being born for cultural reasons.   
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Kami Romeike's curator insight, July 4, 2018 3:21 AM

There are far-reaching consequences to the gender imbalances in India and China.  The fantastically rich article covers four major impacts: 

Village life and mental health. Among men, loneliness and depression are widespread. Villages are emptying out. Men are learning to cook and perform other chores long relegated to women.

Housing prices and savings rates. Bachelors are furiously building houses in China to attract wives, and prices are soaring. But otherwise they are not spending, and that in turn fuels China’s huge trade surplus. In India, there is the opposite effect: Because brides are scarce, families are under less pressure to save for expensive dowries. 

Human trafficking. Trafficking of brides is on the rise. Foreign women are being recruited and lured to China, effectively creating similar imbalances in China’s neighbors.

Public safety. With the increase in men has come a surge in sexual crime in India and concerns about a rise in other crimes in both countries. Harassment of schoolgirls in India has in some towns sparked an effort to push back — but at a cost of restricting them to more protected lives.

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 2018 1:19 PM
population

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 2, 2018 5:20 AM
Population
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South Africa Land Seizures Begin, Economic Decline Accelerates

South Africa Land Seizures Begin, Economic Decline Accelerates | Geography | Scoop.it
South Africa is suddenly facing a roadblock after U.S. President Donald Trump asked Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to study the “land and farm seizures and expropriations and large scale killing of farmers.”
Matt Danielson's insight:
South Africa is traveling down the same road as Zimbabwe did under Mugabe. Evidence is already showing of a declining economy in South Africa. The major issue this causes is the international community losses trust a country will pay back its debts and loans when it doesn't protect property rights of its own citizens and steals their land to give to government cronies. I guarantee if south Africa fully implements this land redistribution plan targeting white farmers, the country will be in a state of famine within 2 years.  
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A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march
Matt Danielson's insight:
his is a great short yet informative breakdown of recent conflict in the Congo. this mineral wealth has lead to much conflict over groups attempting to gain control over it ranging from local militias, the government troops, and outside conflicts spilling in (Rwanda rebels for example). These conflicts have had a severe negative effect on the countries population ranging from political issues, to economic lack of growth because even though minerals are being sold, the wealth gained is not spread to better the country, but to retain control on the mines and for making themselves rich.
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Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:00 PM

once again a recurring theme, greedy and corrupt people running countries. with such immense mineral deposits how can this country not be prospering. because the people of these countries are selfish and once again not nationalistic to the point where people will try to make a significant change.

Brian von Kraus's curator insight, January 12, 2016 6:15 PM

Amazing videographic from The Economist showing the recent history of Congo that explains the current instability of the country. 

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 4:06 PM
The natural resources located in Congo have caused a lot of government instability. There are many competing groups of violent people in the small country of Congo. The country of Congo has been through a lot militia struggle and people trying to seize power of the country, not always for the resources but in some cases for ratification of minority group that the majority group does not like. Congo is at the bottom of the spectrum of health and wealth as well.
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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | Geography | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest
Matt Danielson's insight:
It is mind blowing sometimes to look at a country at face value having that much wealth yet  being poor. There has been a struggle in the Congo for hundreds of years ranging from colonialism, to civil war, to today with rebel groups fighting for mineral control. The issues of needing minerals from the Congo, with its unstable corrupt government, will always lead to rebel groups (or the government itself) creating conflict to attain resources for wealth.
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David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 28, 2018 12:55 PM
This article highlights that resources don't mean that a country will succeed. Resources can bring success or failure to a nation. The Congo has resources that are critical to the digital world's gadgets and toys but is a country that is decimated by events in and outside of its borders. Since the 15th century, the nation of the Congo has had its course be dictated by foreign forces. Either by imperial forces like the Belgians or by fellow African nations. The country is rich with resources that have been critical to civilizations since the Victorian era with resources like rubber being in high demand. This would carrier even further into the 20th century with the overnight demand for uranium with developments into nuclear power and weaponry. After World War II under the Atlantic Charter, the Belgians had to give up its hold of the Congo. Its "leader" decided to violate human rights in Rwanda and due to this was toppled by an alliance of 9 nations. Unfortunately, this would not be the of atrocities in the nation, the puppet government that was installed decided to act without Rwanda's guidance and war would begin again. With the demand high for the resources this nation holds has given birth to even worst atrocities. Children are conspribted into the army and have miners to harvest the resources that lie underneath its soil. If the West is going to buy resources from this country then it needs to step up its game and help end the conflict through diplomatic means. 
 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 31, 2018 4:47 PM
(Africa) This article chronicles why the Democratic Republic of the Congo is among the lowest ranked countries on the Human Development Index despite its plethora of resources. The inciting action leading to DRC's modern problems is slavery. The Portuguese promoted internal warfare to topple the advanced Kingdom of Kongo in the late 1400s to allow better access to slaves. Later, the Congo's vast natural resources would actually be their bane; Europeans would be attracted to the land's fertile river soil, gold, diamonds, oil, and other minerals. The British and Belgian conquered the region ruthlessly first for rubber, then copper for WWI, then uranium for WWII, all the while keeping the Congolese subjugated without rights.

When the DRC gained independence in 1960, there was no framework or educated citizens who could provide stability and civil war predictably ensued, leading to a dictator unchallenged by the modernized world because of his sale of resources. Several African countries invaded, leading to hundreds of domestic and foreign militants fighting in chaos. Now, there is almost no infrastructure. The country's problems go back hundreds of years to a series of inhumane foreign interventions powered by the DRC's wealth potential.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 1:30 PM
Why are so many resource-rich countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo so poor and unstable? More modern reasons like the corruption, the dictators, and wars come to mind sure, but what put countries like the DRC is these positions? Naturally, it all goes back to colonialism and slavery. The second that Europeans learned of the immense resources they carve up the territory, they have a skirmish to see who gets a bigger slice, and oppress the people so there is no chance of rebellion. In the DRC after Belgium finally left the Congolese had none of their own who were trained or had the experience to run a nation. I am sure there are people fighting for the best of the country, but when you have been kicked down for so long by so many peoples it is tough to get back up.
 
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Is Zealandia the eighth continent?

"A group of geologists say they've enough evidence to confirm the existence of a new continent. Writing in the journal of the Geological Society of America, the group named the eighth continent 'Zealandia.' Scientists argue for an 8th continent, Zealandia, in the Geological Society of America."

Matt Danielson's insight:
This is interesting to think about. What decides what separates continents, is it geological barriers, is it culture, is it ethnic origin, or maybe even plate tectonics? Either way you look at it New Zealand makes a great case for why they could become to be considered the eighth continent. I could argue either way, to keep it simple and go by culture and geological commonalities (Oceania Islands) I would prefer it does not form its own continent. These geologist would argue otherwise.
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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, April 4, 2017 4:08 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: What makes a continent a continent? There is no set definition of a continent. Some consider cultural groupings and would consider Europe as a separate continent from Asia as a consequence. Geologists consider continental shelves as the defining characteristics of a continent and thus consider Eurasia to be just one continent. We are so accustomed to seeing the coastlines, but if the ocean were drained, we'd see Zealandia and it's ancient confidential shelf--but don't expect all the continental maps in elementary schools to change anytime soon. Questions to Ponder: Does human geography or physical geography determine what you consider a continent? How come?
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 13, 2017 10:59 AM
unit 1
David Stiger's curator insight, December 7, 2018 9:16 AM
With 94% of Zealandia lying under water, most average people around the world will not care if National Geographic prints maps with an eighth continent. As cynical as that may be, geography should not be settled by human emotions and cultural expectations. Geography is a discipline that aims for understanding and precision. If continents are to be decided by continental shelves, rather than human cultural and ethnic patterns, then Eurasia is a continent and so is Zealandia. This latter outlook of focusing on physical geography is far more neutral and scientific. I would argue that is also more 'progressive'. Humans originate from one place (Africa) and are all one species. We have far more similarities than differences. Orienting our worldview to see that cultural geography is not the final arbiter of truth would ultimately bring people together. The logic follows that by acknowledging Zealandia, there is precedent for greater accuracy based on science, allowing geographers to teach about Eurasia. This is significant because it would alter the perception that Asians and Europeans are extremely distinct and separate groups due to a distorted notion that they lived on separate continents. The truth is that both groups existed on the same continent and were often brought into contact with each other throughout history. This idea, however, would further shatter the notion of a "pure, homogeneous Europe." Europe is only a "continent" because white Europeans were the first to possess the right combination of "guns, germs, and steel" to conquer other societies and elevate their own group's cultural status. Despite nature's evidence, Europeans awarded themselves an entire continent. In reality, Europe is a large peninsula of Asia. Just as Zealandia is an eighth continent sleeping underneath the waves. 
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Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | Geography | Scoop.it

"If you think the United States is every immigrant's dream, reconsider. Sure, in absolute numbers, the U.S. is home to the most foreign-born people — 45.7 million in 2013. But relatively, it's upper-mid-pack as an immigrant nation. It ranks 65th worldwide in terms of percentage of population that is foreign-born, according to the U.N. report 'Trends in International Migrant Stock.'  Whether tax havens and worker-hungry Gulf states, refugee sanctuaries or diverse, thriving economies, a host of nations are more immigrant-dense than the famed American melting pot.  Immigrants make up more than a fourth (27.7 percent) of the land Down Under; two other settler nations, New Zealand and Canada, weigh in with 25.1 and 20.7 percent foreign-born, respectively. That's compared to 14.3 percent in the United States." 


Tags: migration, population, USA, Australia, Oceania.

Matt Danielson's insight:
With some countries having as many as 25% of people being foreighn born I wonder how much of this diversity could cause social upheaval. As we learned in class sometimes cultural differences can cause major issues in a country, and often times without a major culture tying every one together the country will inevitably split up or have civil strife similar to what we see in parts of Europe from mass migration.  I wonder what effect migration will have in places like Australia 5-10 years from now. Especially if the cultures these immigrants come from are drastically different then Australian culture. 
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:35 AM

Immigration has become a dominate issue in the 2016 presidential campaign. For those who believe that the United States is letting in to many immigrants, I refer you to the statistics in this article. Only 14 percent of our population is foreign born. The United States ranks 65th in the world in the percentages of the population that is foreign born. We are far behind the two most prominent Oceanic nations, Australia and New Zealand. Nearly twenty eight percent of Australians are foreign born. Twenty five percent of New Zealanders are also foreign born. Those nations are actually more representative of the melting pot philosophy, than the United States is.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:16 PM

the us is not the choice nation of nations. it is not the most sought nation for migrants. that means we must be doing something right or wrong.

David Stiger's curator insight, December 5, 2018 11:25 AM
Facts put major cultural issues into perspective. The facts found in this NPR article indicate that much of the world - and not just the United States - is grappling with immigration issues. Although the U.S. has the largest foreign-born population in raw numbers, it does not make up as large a percentage as the overall population as some other nations. Compared to the U.S.'s immigrant population of 14.3%, Australia's foreign-born subgroup makes up 27.7% while New Zealand's hit 25.1%. That is over one-fourth of the entire population in each country. 

Australia and New Zealand are ideal as they are both relatively safe, stable, progressive, and economically developed nations that have room to grow. 

The issue, especially for Australia, is taking in high numbers of unskilled workers who can be difficult to integrate into the economy. The U.S., mainly from the right, has also complained about this trend. Many migrant workers, however, are filling low-wage, unskilled jobs that non-immigrant workers shun and have no desire for. Considering that immigrants who fill these jobs earn their keep, pay taxes, and stimulate the economy by spending their money outweighs the potential economic burden. The truth of the matter is that natives in Australia and the United States are more fearful of the cultural, social, ethnic, religious, and linguistic changes that often take place when outside groups settle within a new country. This diversity can surely enrich a society. It can also stress out traditionalists, fearful of change, and cause social unrest and animosity. The important thing for Americans to understand is that we are not the only country wrestling with a globalized world in which people transcend boundaries, diversity is on the rise, and change happens. Just look to Oceania. 
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ISIS in the Philippines: The Battle for Marawi City

ISIS in the Philippines: The Battle for Marawi City | Geography | Scoop.it
As residents seek safety, much of Marawi has become a ghost town, with pockets held either by extremists or troops.
Matt Danielson's insight:
Last year Isis had opened up an unexpected front in the Philippine city of Marawi. This is the only non Catholic dominated city and is a majority Muslim. This has always lead to tensions and slight terrorism from Islamic extremist upset they live in a Christian dominated country. Under Isis though they were emboldened. The Philippines were already facing many crimes of there own (specifically with the drug trade violence) this Islamic uprising only lead to far more issues. The fighting was brutal and often house to house with many civilians caught in the crossfire.   
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Singapore’s 'National Night' Encourages Citizens to Make Babies

Singapore’s 'National Night' Encourages Citizens to Make Babies | Geography | Scoop.it
Singapore's unbelievably low birthrates have inspired National Night, a campaign to encourage Singaporean couples to let their patriotism explode on August 9.

 

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation; Singapore's National Night was an innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (warning: the video is a touch provocative). 

Matt Danielson's insight:
Like Denmark, Russia, Japan, and many other modernized countries Singapore deals with the problem of declining fertility rate. Similar to programs in Denmark Singapore attempts to encourage "baby making" through holidays and incentives.  
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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 15, 2014 10:13 AM

Unit 2

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 3:11 PM

This is very interesting. Singapore has inspired a campaign called "National Night" has encouraged couples to "let their patriotism explode" and have children. Singapore's population is quickly decreasing due to their low birthrates. They want to encourage parents to feel like it is their civic duty to bring kids into this world. The government is pushing for a more parent-friendly environment that includes longer maternity and paternity leaves and larger housing for growing families. Usually the majority of these countries have the opposite problem with an overbearing population so it's refreshing to see a different side of it. This video is definitely trying to target a certain audience by trying to boost their fertility rates.

Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 4:49 PM
Like many countries with waning birth rates, Singapore has created a marketing campaign to get their citizens in bed. Interestingly enough the "National Night" is also sponsored by Mentos of all companies. The Singaporean Government has also implemented new laws such as longer maternity and paternity leave and larger housing for families. 
 
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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...


Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.

Matt Danielson's insight:
This is the perfect product to use as an example of global trade. Starting from somewhere like Malaysia using palm oil, and traveling around the world to collect all the ingredients needed to create a common product found on American grocery store shelfs.  Makes me laugh when people complain how expensive a product like this is, when in reality due to modern technology the product is extremely affordable taking into account the processes it must go through to be created. 
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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The Two Koreas

The Two Koreas | Geography | Scoop.it

"While the Korean War of the early 1950s never formally ended, its aftermath has created starkly divergent worlds for those living on either side of the north-south divide. What follows is a look at life in the two Koreas; how such a night-and-day difference came to be; and where the crisis could go from here. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate rulers of the peninsula. Tensions between north and south gradually mounted, until finally, in June 1950, hundreds of thousands of North Korean troops stormed across the 38th parallel. The unsuspecting South Korean defenders were outgunned and outnumbered, and beat a hasty retreat southward."

Matt Danielson's insight:
The two Koreas are a great example of how Capitalism, Democracy, and liberty are far better than Communism. Just the difference in light visible from satellites at night in the two countries speaks volumes. The war being technically not over and only under cease-fire always leaves that chance for the conflict to reopen. Though today they are taking major steps toward peace and making moves that have never been done before. The amount of famine and overall  sub quality of life in North Korea is mind blowing, and with much of it kept secret its hard to imagine how bad it really is.
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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 26, 2018 7:53 PM
(East Asia) This article explains the relationship between the Korean War and modern tensions. After WWII, the USSR occupied territory to the north of the 38th parallel and the US occupied the south. The governments of each half both claimed to be the true government of the whole peninsula until North Korea invaded the South, starting the Korean War. Communist China's entry forced UN and US troops into a stalemate at the parallel, eventually leading to an armistice establishing the DMZ, the most defended border in the world. In subsequent decades, North Koreans have dug tunnels under the DMZ to start a new invasion.

With Soviet help, Kim Il-sung created a military communist dictatorship in the north while the UN created a democracy in South Korea.

Despite common cultural heritage, there is a stark contrast between the two countries. The north has half the population, a higher birth rate, and a life expectancy 12 years lower, displaying the country's mismanagement. While the South has free press, free travel, and is the strongest economy in Asia, North Korea subjugates through punishment and is almost completely isolated. North Koreans have little access to food, electricity, and roads.

North Korea has developed a more aggressive policy in the last decade. Many successful missile tests have been made, including one fired over Japan into the Pacific Ocean last year. Even China, North Korea's one ally, has imposed sanctions on the country. Some think a peaceful solution is still available, while others watch the USA-NK Twitter war in anticipation.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 9:10 PM
The two Koreas are polar opposites literally, North and South. The Korean war that took place some 68 years ago never formally ended because they could not come to peace agreements. So the border between North and South Korea known as the DMZ is the most heavily fortified border in the world because tensions still run high. The DMZ is the cease fire line. Both sides fear invasion, however in the current state of things it seems as if the North is more aggressive towards invasion that the South, as the South has found some secret tunnels and fear there's more by the North Koreans. Economically the North is severely behind in the world because of there dictators. While the South has become an economic Tiger thanks to the UN and USA trying to promote democracy in the area.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 3:54 PM
For the two Korean nations, there are stark contrasts in the standard of living and wealth of the people. While the Korean war began in the 1950's it never formally ended a ceasefire was called and has just not flared up in a massive battle again. The two nations are uneasy with each other having different ideas for what Korea should be, but both nations do want a joint Korea. Looking at a map of the energy consumption by the two nations there is a line between those who have it and those who do not. These two have shown solidarity as well in the Olympics joining as one nation, but tensions will continue to flare for a long time.
 
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Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures

Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures | Geography | Scoop.it
This series of images shows the extent of China’s pollution problems and the human toll of exponential growth on local communities in China’s vast and severely damaged northern region

 

Ghazlan Mandukai, 52, left, looks out over the vast, toxic tailings lake beyond the industrial city of Baotou, Inner Mongolia. He farmed in this area for 40 years until the influx of steel and rare earth metal factories rendered local lands infertile. Poisonous waste that results from refining rare earths is continually dumped into the Weikuang Dam, as seen here.

 

Tags: pollution, China, East Asia, industry, sustainability, images, art, landscape.

 

Matt Danielson's insight:
CHina's pollution issues are pretty bad, possibly the worst polluter in the world. The air quality can be so terrible it reminds me of Industrial revolution London, except Chinese cities are even worse. Not just air pollution from smoke stacks but land pollution from dirty mining and water pollution in rivers from factories all play key roles in China's pollution problem. Some estimates put the number as high as a million Chinese deaths per a year attributed to pollution. This article does a good job of breaking down the pollution issue into simple terms.   
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Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 2016 10:21 PM
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 2018 10:30 PM
China has one of the fastest-growing economies in the world: but at what cost? They make themselves competitive in global markets by delivering goods and services at low prices, which they achieve through under-paying workers, not using resources to ensure workers' safety, and polluting the environment by ignoring protocols for safely disposing of waste products, which costs time and money.  The result is air that is unsafe to breathe, millions of people and animals with poisoned water supplies, and land that cannot be farmed.
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Global Conflict Tracker

Global Conflict Tracker | Geography | Scoop.it
Learn about the world's top hotspots with the Center for Preventive Action's (CPA) interactive Global Conflict Tracker.
Matt Danielson's insight:
Thjis article gives a good summary of the border conflicts between Pakistan and India mostly in the Kashmir province. Though mostly small skirmishes and paramilitary terrorist groups  (going into India from Pakistan) the tension could potentially get out of hand any time. What surprised me was that even though there is a cease fire in effect, it is not uncommon for border troops to exchange small arms fire at times and people do get killed.  
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The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers

The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers | Geography | Scoop.it

Hinduism shares an intricate, intimate relationship with the climate, geography, and biodiversity of South Asia; its festivals, deities, mythology, scriptures, calendar, rituals, and even superstitions are rooted in nature. There is a strong bond between Hinduism and South Asia’s forests, wildlife, rivers, seasons, mountains, soils, climate, and richly varied geography, which is manifest in the traditional layout of a typical Hindu household’s annual schedule. Hinduism’s existence is tied to all of these natural entities, and more prominently, to South Asia’s rivers.

 

Hinduism as a religion celebrates nature’s bounty, and what could be more representative of nature’s bounty than a river valley? South Asian rivers have sustained and nourished Hindu civilizations for centuries. They are responsible for our prosperous agriculture, timely monsoons, diverse aquatic ecosystems, riverine trade and commerce, and cultural richness.  Heavily dammed, drying in patches, infested by sand mafia and land grabbers, poisoned by untreated sewage and industrial waste, and hit by climate change — our rivers, the cradle of Hinduism, are in a sorry state.

 

If there is ever a threat to Hinduism, this is it. Destroy South Asia’s rivers and with it, Hinduism’s history and mythology will be destroyed. Rituals will turn into mockery, festivals, a farce, and Hinduism itself, a glaring example of man’s hypocritical relationship with nature. The fact that we worship our rivers as mothers and then choke them to death with all sorts of filth is already eminent.

Matt Danielson's insight:
The river plays a key role in India. Whether its culture, religion, histor,y in agriculture, in transportation, and in many other aspects. These once bountiful rivers that sustained Indian civilizations are now threatened by pollution, climate change, damns, and other man made reasons. At best if this is problem is not solved it will lead to drastic changes in Indian society, at worse it could lead to the collapse of Indian society, Starting with the end of Hindu rituals. 
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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 24, 2018 12:57 PM
(South Asia) With a population of 1.3 billion people, India is bound to have serious problems with pollution. But pollution has a profound impact on a religion closely tied with nature and geographic locations for thousands of years. Rivers that were previously seen as the "nurturers of Hinduism" are now drying up because of climate change or are polluting the area. The destruction of Indian rivers is not given proper public attention and the loss of rivers could lead to the loss of Indian history and the meaning of Hindu culture.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 2018 1:21 AM
Religion is shaped by the geography of the region in which it develops.  For example, Hinduism is heavily influenced by the rivers of India, and these rivers are considered holy places sites and places of cleansing and purification.  However, the cleansing power of the rivers is diminished by pollution that makes it unsafe to take part in ritual bathing.  Pollution, climate change, and deforestation are also having an impact on other aspects of Hinduism, which is about celebrating nature in it's entirety, including monsoons, forests, and agriculture.  As nature continues to be negatively impacted by human activity, many aspects of Hinduism will also be negatively impacted.
David Stiger's curator insight, November 12, 2018 3:19 PM
Sometimes both sides can be wrong in an argument, as illustrated in this article. The secular left in India has mistaken their conservative Hindu counterparts as a people stuck in tradition, unable to address the environmental calamities facing modern society. The more right-leaning Hindus believe the secular environmentalism of their countrymen to be antagonistic to the practice of Hinduism - such as the environmental restrictions on firecrackers. Hindus celebrating Diwali feel that fireworks are a central part of the festivities and do not want environmentalists restricting them. The author notes that both sides have missed the point. Hinduism is closely tied to nature and expresses notions of environmental stewardship as a holy endeavor. Liberal Indians do not need to see Hinduism as opposed to environmental sustainability and should stop criticizing Hinduism as a whole. Traditionally religious Hindus should be aware that their own faith would have them be environmentalists - not because of secularism - but because of divine inspirations to coexist with nature. While both sides bicker, failing to understand how Hinduism is pro-nature, the rivers are being ruined by pollution. This pollution will destroy nature, and nature is the foundation and driving force of the Hindu religion. This is because Hinduism was founded around a  river valley civilization - the river and arable land being central to the culture's vitality. 

In some ways, this situation reminds me of Christianity in America. Liberals are very concerned about the environment and climate change in particular. Conservative Christians, buying into a theology of "Dominionism" of Genesis, believe God gave the earth to humans to use however they please. Paired with a suspicion of science, conservative evangelicals have largely shunned environmental sustainability and conservation. A closer reading of the Bible would show that God values nature and wants creation to grow and thrive. Humans should be stewards of the environment - its destined caretakers. Instead, liberals think Christianity preaches stupidity while conservative Christians believe the science behind environmentalism is anti-God, aligned with communism, and probably a hoax to manipulate the faithful. 


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What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights

What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights | Geography | Scoop.it

"Diwali, one of the biggest holidays in Indian culture, is a five-day festival of lights celebrated worldwide by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains. This year, the traditional day of Diwali falls on Oct. 30, though celebrations span the entire week leading up to and following the holiday, which marks the triumph of good over evil."

Matt Danielson's insight:
This festival seems interesting and all the different lights must be cool to experience.A nice mix of old cultural celebration with more modern traditions (like gift giving, sweets, etc). 
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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2018 6:31 PM
Diwali is the Indian festival that lasts 5 days and celebrates the “triumph of good over evil”. The article explains that the holiday is recognized worldwide, the festival is marked by lighting fireworks, and other objects that give off light and has many origins.
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How did Zimbabwe get so poor?

President Mugabe's economic mismanagement of Zimbabwe has brought the country poverty and malnutrition. After 36 years in charge, he's looking to extend his rule by 5 more years.
Matt Danielson's insight:
ItIt is horrible that after Zimbabwe gained it independence from a apartheid like government that oppressed some of its people, its leaders including Mugabe turned around and continued to oppress certain people. They kicked out all the white farmers (a majority of farms at the time in Zimbabwe were owned by whites)  and replaced them with government friends. This obviously leads to famine with not many crops being grown. The market was decimated because Zimbabwe went from being a bread basket of African agriculture to a malnutrition state begging for economic aide to prevent mass starvation. History may repeat itself today where South Africa is attempting to make the same mistake. 
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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2018 4:58 PM
This video investigates how the country of Zimbabwe managed to become impoverished. Under the reign of Robert Mugabe, the country’s agricultural sector was destroyed. In doing so, he caused the money run out, so he printed more which caused worst hyperinflation ever. This video shows how the countries that are run poorly can affect its inhabitants.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 2018 10:02 AM
Robert Mugabe's blatant and stunning incompetence and corruption destroyed the value of the Zimbabwean dollar and the resulting hyperinflation decimated the national economy. This is one of the premier examples of how a total lack of competent and powerful institutions can undermine a once promising economy and devolve a nation into one of the poorest on earth. 
David Stiger's curator insight, November 7, 2018 11:40 AM
Setting the record for world history's worst case of hyperinflation should send a signal to any sane person that a change of course is drastically needed. But, it seems Zimbabwe's chief dictator (parading as a "president"), Robert Mugabe, made one-too-many errors leading to the collapse of his country's economy. The unemployment rate hit 95% in 2008. One could argue this disaster started with British racism and exploitation. To deal with the complex legacy of European colonialism, Mugabe confiscated all the commercial farmland from white owners and redistributed the business to friends, loyalists, and family who did not have any expertise in running agricultural businesses. To make a few short-term gains, the valuable lands were sold off and neglected. Consequently, the agricultural sector crumpled severely reducing the flow of revenue and trade. To combat this, Mugabe decided to cheat and print more money - causing a process of vicious hyperinflation. The excessive regulations and taxes also make it difficult for new businesses in Zimbabwe to get off the ground. 

In relation to geography, it is interesting to analyze how the aftermath of British colonialism and good natural resources are present in the world's poorest country. Mugabe's decision to push out white farmers was clearly a big man method of dealing with the shame, grief, and anger of colonial exploitation, theft, and degradation. This aggressive backfired as even though the land is quite arable, it requires special knowledge, management, and dedication on part of the land's stewards to reap success. This seems to be a trend in some African countries. They are endowed with good natural resources to build a strong economy. The problems created by colonialism, however, and the lack of human capital in these African nations have led to cases of severe mismanagement and struggle. 
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South Africa Is Still Under Apartheid

"More than two decades after the end of apartheid in South Africa, Cape Town remains racially segregated, with many black residents living in substandard townships."

Matt Danielson's insight:
South Africa had a long history of issues ranging back to Colonialism, through apartheid, and today with government corruption and internal strife. The great inequality left behind after apartheid is a major issue in the country for many people. One way this has been addressed recently is with land redistribution, but this policy has faced much controversy especially since many have suggested the government being able to confiscate "white owned land"  without compensation and use for redistribution.
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Matt Manish's curator insight, May 2, 2018 11:26 PM
One can see from this video that Apartheid still exists in some parts of South Africa such as Cape Town. From the drone footage in this video, one can see how divided Cape Town's landscape is from a bird's eye view. You can see how the black community lives in the part of town that is made up of mainly shacks. Right next door, you can see that the white community lives in the suburbs with regular housing and lush trees located adjacently to the black community's village of shacks. It's not just the residential areas of Cape Town that is segregated. Even in the heart of the city, a real racial tension between blacks and whites can be sensed,. Resulting in the majority of the black community being less successful than the white community. One can clearly see that even though Apartheid has officially ended, the tension between blacks and whites still exists in this part of South Africa.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 9:34 PM
This video looks into the still segregated town of Cape Town, located in South Africa. Although it was racially segregated by apartheid in the 20th century, Apartheid was outlawed in 1994. Since then, it has been claimed that Cape Town has become more diverse. This is only true to some extent. Because of the apartheid, it was nearly impossible for Blacks and People of Color to get jobs in the city. Therefore, the different races now inhabit their own neighborhoods, however the segregation still lingers. In most white neighborhoods, they enjoy beautiful and safe lifestyles while the poorer neighbors can’t even afford running water or electricity. Tags: South Africa, Africa, race, ethnicity, neighborhood, urban, planning, drought, water, urban ecology.