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Persuasive EHR Workflow Design Increased Same-Day Data Entry by 10%

Persuasive EHR Workflow Design Increased Same-Day Data Entry by 10% | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Incorporating persuasive design concepts into primary care electronic health records (EHRs) increased same-day data entry by 10 percent per physician, demonstrating the potential for persuasive design to change data entry behavior, a study published in JMIR Human Factors revealed.

 

Persuasive design is a way of developing technology to influence behavior by leveraging social processes. Healthcare stakeholders have primarily focused on using persuasive design in consumer-facing mobile apps to improve outcomes, but there are few examples of using persuasive design to influence clinician behavior.

 

In primary care settings, providers often face barriers to entering data into EHRs in a timely manner.  Data entry tasks often take a long time, and users may feel as if completing documentation is a lower priority than seeing patients or finishing other tasks.

 

“Persuasive design is a viable approach for designing and encouraging behavior change and could support effective data capture in the field of medical informatics. There may be opportunities to continue improving this approach, and further work is required to perfect and test additional designs,” the team concluded.

 

read the original unedited article at https://healthitanalytics.com/news/persuasive-ehr-workflow-design-increased-same-day-data-entry-by-10

 

 

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Penn Medicine’s new transformation project looks to fill the ‘middle space’ between EHRs and clinicians

Penn Medicine’s new transformation project looks to fill the ‘middle space’ between EHRs and clinicians | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A new project launched by Penn Medicine last week will take on the monumental task of EHR usability.

 

Impatient with the current progress of electronic health records (EHRs), one of the nation’s foremost academic medical centers is taking matters into its own hands.

 

Last week, Penn Medicine—which operates as the health system under the University of Pennsylvania—launched a new initiative aimed at transforming EHRs into “more streamlined, interactive, smarter tools.”

 

That effort will focus primarily on what David Asch, M.D., the executive director of the Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation, calls “the middle space” between EHRs and clinical productivity.

 

“It’s about the creation of some middleware that takes the EHR products created by large companies and creates interfaces that are better,” he told FierceHealthcare. “It might ultimately be absorbed by those [EHR] companies, but I don’t think we can wait. I don’t think we should force clinicians to move to the EHR when we can be a part of the solution to help bring the EHR to them.”

 

Part of Penn Medicine’s effort is a focus on using EHRs not just as an administrative or documentation tool, but also pushing it into the care delivery arena. That involves shaking up the traditional health system approach that says clinicians simply need more education to unlock the unused functionality of EHRs. The notion that clinicians need help becoming the “master of the EHR” often rubs them the wrong way, Asch says.

 

more at https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/tech/penn-medicine-s-new-transformation-project-middle-space-ehrs-and-clinicians

 

 

 

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Alexa for Doctors Claims 70 Percent Reduction in #EHR Time 

Alexa for Doctors Claims 70 Percent Reduction in #EHR Time  | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Suki, the artificial intelligence (AI) voice assistant for healthcare professionals, launched in May to praise from health-tech innovators who hoped “Alexa for doctors” might slash electronic health record (EHR) documentation time.

If the company’s early numbers are any indication, that wish might come true.

Suki said recently that doctors who use the digital assistant have seen a 70 percent drop in time spent writing and filing medical notes.

 

That figure is 10 percentage points better than the preliminary results of Suki’s pilot. The finding could prove powerful, as research has suggested that physicians burn almost two hours in the EHR for every hour of patient interaction.

 

Suki has processed more than 12,000 patient encounters in the real world, handling 1,000 per week, according to the company. This steady stream of real-world data is poised to strengthen the technology’s machine-learning algorithm, which was trained on 250,000 patient encounters before it went live.

So far, Suki has integrated with three EHR systems. The company said that number is slated to rise.

Using voice commands, the technology pens a “clinically accurate” note that it then sends to a doctor’s EHR system.

Over the past several years, innovators across healthcare have advocated for a clinical voice assistant. But the challenges are many, from precise listening and documentation to satisfying cybersecurity concerns.

Although a clinical AI assistant might be far off for many providers and health systems, Suki and similar technologies could help solve a mounting problem in medicine: physician burnout.


Time spent in the EHR has been linked to physician burnout. On the conference circuit and in the opinion pages, doctor after doctor describes the stresses of medical note documentation — and how these demands eat up time and detract from care delivery.

Can Suki help improve workflows? It seems so. But can it go a step beyond and help physicians overcome burnout? Maybe. The answer to that question will depend on adoption rates and how Suki performs at scale.

 

Will Suki become a part of the clinic of tomorrow? Lets wait and see

 

read the unedited story at https://www.hcanews.com/news/alexa-for-doctors-claims-70-percent-reduction-in-ehr-time

 

 

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Implementation of an Automated Pediatric Malnutrition Screen Using Anthropometric Measurements in the #EHR

Implementation of an Automated Pediatric Malnutrition Screen Using Anthropometric Measurements in the #EHR | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Nutrition evaluation and intervention in hospitalized pediatric patients is critical, because undernutrition negatively impacts physical and cognitive development, wound healing, immune function, mortality, and quality of life.

 

Multiple, validated pediatric nutrition screening tools are available, yet no consensus on the ideal tool exists.

 

Generally, the aims of the nutrition screening process are identification of current nutrition status and determination of a need for further nutrition assessment and intervention.

 

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia has developed what it says is the first automated pediatric malnutrition screening tool using EHR data.

 

In this study the tool was used to analyze anthropometric measurements in the hospital’s Epic EHR—including body mass index, height, length and weight—for inpatients in the pediatric oncology unit at CHOP for a little more than a year, representing about 2,100 hospitalizations.

 

Researchers used software to take note of changes in the anthropometric measurements to assess each hospitalized patient’s risk of malnutrition. For those pediatric cancer patients determined to be at risk, the automated program categorized their risk as either mild, moderate or severe.

 

In the study, 47 percent were classified as at mild risk, 24 percent as moderate risk and 29 percent as severe—consistent with clinical experience and other research. In addition, the overall prevalence of malnutrition was determined to be 42 percent for the study period, which was also consistent with previous studies.

 

“This test study demonstrates the feasibility of using EHR data to create an automated screening tool for malnutrition in pediatric inpatients, Further research is needed to formally assess this screening tool, but it has the potential to identify at-risk patients in the early stages of malnutrition, so we can intervene quickly. In addition, this tool could be implemented to screen all pediatric patients for malnutrition, because it uses data common to all electronic medical records.”

 

ref: https://www.healthdatamanagement.com/news/chop-uses-ehr-data-to-identify-cancer-patients-for-malnutrition

 

study: https://jandonline.org/article/S2212-2672(18)30974-2/abstract

 

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Major grant for development of ehealth program for cardiac rehabilitation

Major grant for development of ehealth program for cardiac rehabilitation | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Every year, more than 3 million people in Europe experience a heart attack. For half of them, this is not the first time. Most of these recurrent heart attacks can be prevented by improving the lifestyle after the first heart attack, for which patients are often offered cardiac rehabilitation. These programs consist of exercise and lifestyle recommendations. Cardiac rehabilitation is provided at specialized centers.
 
According to estimates, if all cardiac patients were to undergo cardiac rehabilitation, the mortality from myocardial infarctions could fall by 26 percent and hospital admissions by more than 30 percent. Despite these benefits, less than half of cardiac patients receive cardiac rehabilitation. This lack of participation is mainly due the distance to the cardiac rehabilitation centers, which patients experience as being too far. There are also many objections to the limited possibilities for taking an individualized program.
 
Research has shown that an internet-based rehabilitation program can achieve the same results as rehabilitation at a center. An e-health application for cardiac rehabilitation could therefore eliminate many obstacles for patients.

 

However, such an application is not yet available.

 

With Eurostar funding of € 1.9 million, a European consortium of researchers and companies will create CaRe, a mobile platform for cardiac rehabilitation.

 

Maria Hopman is creating this e-health program for cardiac rehabilitation together with a consortium of Danish and Swiss companies. Starting in 2021, the program will be available for physiotherapists and hospitals in Europe.

 

more at https://www.radboudumc.nl/en/news/2018/major-grant-for-development-of-e-health-program-for-cardiac-rehabilitation

 

 

 

 

nrip's insight:

This week I am finding a lot of exciting pilots being funded well enough to take them to commercialization. Which is excellent. However, I find a number of such pilots seem to overlap in ideas and purpose. I wish there is collaboration of ideas between similar projects, especially, if not only to avoid another lack of interoperability scenario, arising 3-4 years from now, and causing pain for patients and care givers alike.

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Healthcare Technology Insights for Oct 1st — Oct 14th 2018

Healthcare Technology Insights for Oct 1st — Oct 14th 2018 | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
This fortnight, in the spirit of the #NHITWeek ,as expected a lot of curations were based around the Uses of Automation and Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare.
 
Here are our top 5 insights by our experts on the stories from the past fortnight.

 

mHealth platforms are helping healthcare providers with Quick Access to Decision Support Resources

 

insight by Nrip Nihalani

 

Well how surprising! Collective human intelligence still works :)

 

As I been posting in my articles, speaking at my talks and offering my $0.02 in my insights, for all the talk of AI and Deep Learning, I feel technology’s best use in healthcare is in automation of processes and improving communication and collaboration between care teams. And such studies show that we have lots to gain by building better tools to help clinicians communicate and collaborate better. Someday , AI “may” replace human intelligence, but not today and not anytime soon.

 

Proposing a Transactional Model of eHealth Literacy: Concept Analysis

 

insight by Nrip Nihalani

 

eHealth literacy is the ability of internet users to locate, evaluate, and act upon web-based health information. The result of this study identifies that the role of “communication” in eHealth literacy remains underdeveloped.

 

Current frameworks and technologies do not account for physical and cognitive processing abilities necessary for multiway transactions.

 

A study of the Consumption(access by patients) patterns of a majority of patient education resources will be interesting. It may shed light on this underdevelopment being required or not.

 

more at https://medium.com/@plus91/healthcare-technology-insights-for-oct-1st-oct-14th-2018-8505bbd81fd9

 

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Estonia and Finland will start exchanging digital prescriptions at the end of 2018

Estonia and Finland will start exchanging digital prescriptions at the end of 2018 | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Estonia and Finland will start exchanging digital prescriptions at the end of the year, in a groundbreaking move that Estonian Health Minister Riina Sikkut said she hoped other EU countries will follow.

 

Speaking to EURACTIV.com on the sidelines of the European Health Forum in Gastein, Austria, Sikkut said that in Estonia, it is common practice for healthcare professionals to use the e-health system to exchange patient medical records.

 

“But it is also important for people who have a need for healthcare services abroad to have his or her health data available to a doctor, nurse or a pharmacist so that they could also provide quality healthcare services and continuity of care,” she said.

 

The cross-border flow of data has taken centre stage in the discussion in Brussels. Right now, when citizens move to another EU member state, their healthcare data is in fact simply “lost”.

 

Advocates of the digitisation of healthcare say data mobility, or the “5th freedom”, in the EU could unlock the potential of innovation in the sector and make EU patients’ lives easier.

 

Estonia is known for its digitisation push in all sectors, and during its EU Presidency (July-December 2017), it took significant steps to create a “coalition of the willing” of EU member states to speed up healthcare data mobility in Europe.

 
 
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Automated malnutrition screening system for hospitalized children #NHITWeek

Automated malnutrition screening system for hospitalized children #NHITWeek | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A team of clinicians, dietitians and researchers has created an innovative automated program to screen for malnutrition in hospitalized children, providing daily alerts to healthcare providers so they can quickly intervene with appropriate treatment. The malnutrition screen draws on existing patient data in electronic health records (EHR)

 

"Undernutrition is extremely common in children with cancer--the population we studied in this project," said study leader Charles A. Phillips, MD, a pediatric oncologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). "There is currently no universal, standardized approach to nutrition screening for children in hospitals, and our project is the first fully automated pediatric malnutrition screen using EHR data."

 

Phillips and a multidisciplinary team of fellow oncology clinicians, registered dietitians and quality improvement specialists co-authored a paper published Oct. 5, 2018 in the Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics.

 

The study team analyzed EHR data from inpatients at CHOP's 54-bed pediatric oncology unit over the period of November 2016 through January 2018, covering approximately 2,100 hospital admissions. The anthropometric measurements in the EHR included height, length, weight and body mass index. The researchers used software to take note of changes in those measurements, and used criteria issued by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, to evaluate each patient's risk of malnutrition.

 

For each child that the screening program judged to be at risk, the tool classified the risk as mild, moderate or severe. It then automatically generated a daily e-mail to hospital clinicians, listing each patient's name, medical record number, unit, and malnutrition severity level, among other data.

 

In the patient cohort, the researchers' automated screen calculated the overall prevalence of malnutrition at 42 percent for the entire period of study, consistent with the range expected from previous studies (up to about 65 percent for inpatient pediatric oncology patients). Overall severity levels for malnutrition were 47 percent in the mild category, 24 percent moderate and 29 percent severe; again, consistent with other research and clinical experience.

 

The study leader stated that:

 

This test study demonstrates the feasibility of using EHR data to create an automated screening tool for malnutrition in pediatric inpatients. Further research is needed to formally assess this screening tool, but it has the potential to identify at-risk patients in the early stages of malnutrition, so we can intervene quickly. In addition, this tool could be implemented to screen all pediatric patients for malnutrition, because it uses data common to all electronic medical records.

 

read the unedited original article at https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-10/chop-fam100918.php

 

nrip's insight:

Healthcare data is increasingly being analyzed. While we have written previously on AI, Prediction systems, automation, machine learning and other cool stuff, seemingly uncool technology is what provides the coolest benefits. 

 

But this article and the story behind is the perfect example of how technology can be most effective for improving healthcare workflows in 2018 and 2019. Further ahead the benefits of the previously mentioned cool techs will hopefully be starting to be realizable, but we must use automation and analysis to intervene in current workflows and make them more effective today as much as we can.

 

This directly benefits clinical staff, speeds up care and actually starts making EHR data directly beneficial to those pained by the process of generating it.

 

To know about how many such benefits can be extracted from uncool technologies, check out out websites to learn about Medixcel and talk to us in the comments below.

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Harnessing data to improve patient outcomes

Harnessing data to improve patient outcomes | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

As data and analytics are increasingly leveraged in various aspects of the healthcare system, some companies are  making use of such capabilities to help clinicians make the best decisions for patients.

 

One such company is naviHealth.  Based in Brentwood, Tennessee, naviHealth provides both payers and providers with post-acute care management expertise. Its nH Predict tool allows clinicians to better predict a patient’s outcomes in order to craft a personalized post-acute care plan.

 

Using NaviHealths nH Predict tool, clinicians are better able to predict a patient's outcomes and generate a personalized post-acute care plan.

 

The result of the tool is a simple outcome report that is generated at the beginning of the patient’s stay in a facility or hospital. The report breaks down the patient’s basic information as well as how they’re doing in a variety of categories.

 

For instance, nH Predict outlines the individual’s gender, date of birth and admission date. It also includes their primary diagnostic group (such as COPD) and their usual living setting (like at home alone or in an assisted living facility).

 

Finally, the outcome report provides a score for a few of the patient’s functions based on the data of similar patients. It gives a score on the patient’s basic mobility (such as wheelchair skills or ability to take the stairs); daily activity (like bathing and dressing); and applied cognition (including memory and communication).

 

Additionally, the report creates a total average score for the patient based on their mobility, activity and cognition scores.

 

read the complete story at https://medcitynews.com/2018/10/navihealth-data-patient-outcomes/

 

nrip's insight:

Nowadays, healthcare data is increasingly being analyzed and complex algorithms created to help various aspects of the healthcare ecosystem.

 

This technique where some companies are  making use of such capabilities to help clinicians make the best decisions for patients, is also not new, and there are startups and enthusiasts working on building self learning algorithms to modify clinical pathways to create better patient outcomes in India, Singapore, Scandanavia. If you are working on something similar, please drop me a note. 

 

Beyond the hype, it will be interesting to see if the hypothesized benefits actually translate into reality. 

 

Plus91's R&D has stayed away from improving/modifying/changing medical care plans but instead we built self learning models both for early detection of diseases, as well as for early prediction of epidemics, and while we have been very successful with demonstrating epidemic prediction, and actually preventing it in 2 cases already, the same success is unfortunately not achieved yet in disease detection. 

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Are Universal EHRs Key to Healthcare Value, Trust, and AI Adoption?

Are Universal EHRs Key to Healthcare Value, Trust, and AI Adoption? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

“Universal EHR” structures, in which every citizen’s electronic health record is connected to a single national system, are tied to higher trust in the healthcare system and higher value for patients, 

 

Unified electronic records have also prompted national governments to address issues of privacy and security, data integrity, and health information exchange that are left up to the private sector in other countries – with varying degrees of success.

 

Half of the 16 countries included in the index have universal EHRs, while the other half have let a combination of free market forces and regulatory guidance dictate the course of health IT adoption.

 

The eight countries with universal EHRs saw an average overall “Value Measure” of 47.29, the report says.  The Value Measure is a combined score based on access to care, patient satisfaction, and an efficiency ratio score.

 

Now, Healthcare providers in the United States generally don’t harbor very warm feelings for their electronic health records (EHRs).

 

Despite efforts from vendors and regulators to improve the experience of interacting with these foundational health IT systems, dissatisfaction and frustration with usability issues and fragmented information are still causing users’ blood to boil.

 

It may seem counterintuitive, therefore, to suggest that expanding the industry’s reliance on EHRs is actually the key to making EHR use less stressful and more useful – but that is exactly what the 2018 Future Health Index, commissioned by Philips, seems to indicate.

nrip's insight:

Yes,  Universal EHR” structures lead to higher trust in the healthcare system by physicians and higher value for patients.

 

I have observed this first hand in the development of Universal or Close to Universal (read state wide) systems my team and me have implemented in Africa.

 

The activity percentage(a metric we created to identify usage) by physicians is over 90%, far ahead of the EMRs we encountered in the US and other western nations. The value that different organizations and departments can derive from such structures, keeps growing as you keep involving more of them in the implementation process and be fair to all parties. 

 

The most important mantra to get such a system off the ground is "make no party feel that they give more than they receive"

 

 

 

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AI Software Writing AI Software For Healthcare?

AI Software Writing AI Software For Healthcare? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

At the World Medical Innovation Forum this week, participants were polled with a loaded question:

“Do you think healthcare will become better or worse from the use of AI?”

Across the respondents, 98 percent said it would be either “Better” or “Much Better” and not a single one thought it would become “Much Worse.” This is an interesting statistic, and the results were not entirely surprising, especially given that artificial intelligence was the theme for the meeting.

This continual stream of adoption of new technologies in both clinical and post clinical settings is remarkable. Today, healthcare is a technology operation. As a case in point, outside of the array of MDs and medical professionals presenting at the forum, there was clearly a strong, advanced technology thread weaved throughout the conversations of the traditional topics of pathology, radiology, bioinformatics, electronic medical records (EMR), and standard healthcare provider issues.

As an example, a panel of senior technology experts from Microsoft, Cisco Systems, Dell EMC, Qualcomm, and Google joined research and information officers from Partners Healthcare and Massachusetts General Hospital to discuss the challenges in what they called “Data Engineering in Healthcare: Liberating Value.” That is a serious title for a panel.

Data portability was clearly a key topic, as was security and the public cloud.

The underlying issue with the cloud is that the EMR was never really designed to be portable.

Health records existed with institutional walls, and were not originally intended for real time care, but more as a means of tracking costs and transactions as the patient traveled through the various systems. As the EMR has not only become more feature rich, the ability to mine that data inside of them with ML and AI methods is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s mind right now.

There was discussion of episodic systems wrapped in policy and technology – this really isn’t quite how we can gain the maximum knowledge from the healthcare version of a Digital Me. A digital object containing all of our many and varied health related attributes. The challenges of discussing how to best build a “marketplace” and healthcare data exchanges and how to integrate “data marts” with existing EMR systems was obvious.

nrip's insight:

AI can help clinicians and nurses do their job better. AI will never replace doctors, but doctors which use AI will replace doctors who dont.

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An algorithm is spotting heart problems better than an expert doctor

An algorithm is spotting heart problems better than an expert doctor | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

It might not be long before algorithms routinely save lives—as long as doctors are willing to put ever more trust in machines.

 

An algorithm that spots heart arrhythmia shows how AI will revolutionize medicine—but patients must trust machines with their lives.

 

A team of researchers at Stanford University, led by Andrew Ng, a prominent AI researcher and an adjunct professor there, has shown that a machine-learning model can identify heart arrhythmias from an electrocardiogram (ECG) better than an expert.

 

The automated approach could prove important to everyday medical treatment by making the diagnosis of potentially deadly heartbeat irregularities more reliable. It could also make quality care more readily available in areas where resources are scarce.

 

The work is also just the latest sign of how machine learning seems likely to revolutionize medicine. In recent years, researchers have shown that machine-learning techniques can be used to spot all sorts of ailments, including, for example, breast cancer, skin cancer, and eye disease from medical images.

 

more at : https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608234/the-machines-are-getting-ready-to-play-doctor/

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Kenya: new e-Health regulation to enhance data management

Kenya: new e-Health regulation to enhance data management | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

e-Health practitioners in Kenya have welcomed proposed legislation, including the Health Act 2017 and the Kenya Standard and Guidelines for mHealth Systems, and believe these will safeguard the role of mobility in the sector and encourage interoperability between private and public healthcare.

 

The Health Act 2017 states that within three years of its operation, the ministry of health will implement management information banks which will include an interoperability framework for data interchange and security to effectively manage personal health information.

 

more at : http://www.itwebafrica.com/ict-and-governance/256-kenya/238521-kenya-new-e-health-regulation-to-enhance-data-management

 

nrip's insight:

Its about time kenyan health officials made an announcement, and there is finally one which sounds interesting. Now comes the fun part, how will they execute. Obviously we at Plus91 are excited as we look at taking #Medixcel to Kenya. 

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EHRs offer automated warnings to combat Paediatric Malnutrition

EHRs offer automated warnings to combat Paediatric Malnutrition | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Data from electronic health records (EHR) can be used to create an automated screening tool for malnutrition in paediatric hospital inpatients, according to work by a US team of clinicians, dietitians, and researchers. The system developed by Charles Phillips of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and colleagues provides daily alerts to healthcare providers so they can quickly intervene with appropriate treatment.

 

"Undernutrition is extremely common in children with cancer - the population we studied in this project," explains Phillips, who is a paediatric oncologist at the hospital.

 

"There is currently no universal, standardized approach to nutrition screening for children in hospitals, and our project is the first fully automated pediatric malnutrition screen using EHR data." The multidisciplinary team published details of their approach in the Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics.

 

The team analysed EHR data from inpatients at the hospital's 54-bed paediatric oncology unit for late 2016 to early 2018, which covered around 2100 hospital admissions. The anthropometric measurements in the EHR included height, length, weight and body mass index. The researchers used software to take note of changes in those measurements, and used criteria issued by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, to evaluate each patient's risk of malnutrition based on the ongoing measurements and the EHR data.

 

For each child that the screening program determined to be at risk of under-nutrution, the software would apply a flag of mild, moderate, or severe, and then automatically send an email to the clinicians on the ward giving them each patient's name, medical record number, unit, and malnutrition severity level, as well as other data.

 

 

In the patient cohort, the researchers' automated screen calculated the overall prevalence of malnutrition at 42 percent for the entire period of study. This was consistent with the range expected from previous studies where up to about 65 percent for inpatient paediatric oncology patients is observed). Overall severity levels for malnutrition were 47 percent in the mild category, 24 percent moderate and 29 percent severe; again, consistent with other research and clinical experience.

 

link to the study paper: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2018.07.014

 

Read the original unedited article at http://www.spectroscopynow.com/details/ezine/16652cf45e1/Paediatric-malnutrion-EHRs-offer-automated-warnings.html?tzcheck=1

 

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The state of blockchain, cloud, EHR adoption & more

The state of blockchain, cloud, EHR adoption & more | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

In its State of the Market 2018 report, HIMSS Analytics outlined nationwide adoption of major health IT trends.

 

The report detailed market insights related to blockchain, cloud computing, EHRs, precision medicine and telehealth, among other health IT segments.

 

Here are 5 highlights from the report:

 

1. Blockchain. The plurality of hospitals (45.3 percent) are still learning about blockchain and have not deployed any related programs. However, 55 percent said it is "somewhat likely" they complete a blockchain proof-of-concept or pilot in the next 24 months, followed by 17 percent of whom said it was "very likely."

 

2. Cloud. The majority of hospitals (65 percent) said they currently use the cloud or cloud services. Reasons for adopting cloud services included concerns with disaster recovery (37 percent), lack of internal IT expertise on site (25 percent) and IT maintenance costs (25 percent).

 

3. EHRs. EHRs have achieved almost universal hospital adoption; however, interoperability continues to present a core challenge. Only 2 percent of hospitals are on a single vendor at all affiliated practices, and nearly three-quarters of hospitals said they deal with more than 10 disparate outpatient vendors.

 

4. Precision medicine. Hospitals tended to cite lack of funding, technological or clinical expertise as barriers to adopting precision medicine, although nearly half of hospitals (45 percent) said they plan to expand their existing programs.

 

5. Telehealth. Telehealth adoption has reached 50 percent at U.S. hospitals. Moving forward, 55 percent of hospitals said they are "unsure" if they have plans to invest in telehealth services in the next 24 months, followed by 27 percent that said they do.

 

more at https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/healthcare-information-technology/himss-analytics-the-state-of-blockchain-cloud-ehr-adoption-more.html

 

 

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Head of IBM Watson Health leaving post after growing criticism

Head of IBM Watson Health leaving post after growing criticism | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

After 3 years as head of IBM’s health division, Deborah DiSanzo is leaving her role.

 

A company spokesman said that DiSanzo will no longer lead IBM Watson Health, the Cambridge-based division that has pitched the company’s famed artificial intelligence capabilities as solutions for a myriad of health challenges, like treating cancer and analyzing medical images.

 

Even as it has heavily advertised the potential of Watson Health, IBM has not met lofty expectations in some areas. Its flagship cancer software, which used artificial intelligence to recommend courses of treatment, has been ridiculed by some doctors inside and outside of the company. 

 

And it has struggled to integrate different technologies from other businesses it has acquired, laying off employees in the process.

 

more at https://www.statnews.com/2018/10/19/head-of-ibm-watson-health-leaving-post/

 

 

nrip's insight:

Over the years IBM Watson promised much to the healthcare world and delivered pretty much nothing.  I must say, reading up about IBM Watson taught me a thing or more about marketing :). Given that there is definitely good stuff being worked on within IBM, I hope that IBM will learn that healthcare requires patience and accuracy, and Watson will someday start doing good for healthcare.

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Estonia and Finland sign trailblazing medication deal

Estonia and Finland sign trailblazing medication deal | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Estonia and Finland have signed an agreement which will allow Finns to purchase prescription medication in Estonia via e-prescriptions by the end of December.

 

Estonians will receive reciprocal rights in 2019.

 

The two countries hope that the deal will set a precedent other EU members will follow.

 

In an interview with Euractiv, Estonian Health Minister Riina Sikkut said that it is common practice for healthcare professionals in Estonia to use the e-health system to exchange patient medical records.

 

“But it is also important for people who have a need for healthcare services abroad to have his or her health data available to a doctor, nurse or a pharmacist so that they could also provide quality healthcare services and continuity of care,” said Ms Sikkut.

 

One concern which has prevented such agreements gaining traction before now is that digital prescriptions being available EU-wide could lead to medical tourism.

 

“When Finnish digital prescriptions become valid in Estonia, pharmaceutical drugs can only be bought here by the person to whom the drug is prescribed,” Kaidi Kelt, chief executive of Benu Pharmacies in Estonia, told Baltic News Services (BNS). She added that the possibility of medical tourism can thus be ruled out, stating that a person cannot collect all of their acquaintances’ prescriptions and make regular trips to Estonia simply to buy pharmaceutical drugs in bulk.

 

“Pharmaceutical drugs vary in their price and there is no reason to presume that everything is always cheaper in Estonia,” explains Ms Kelt.

 

“All European pharmacists are keeping an eye on us. The success of this project between Estonia and Finland could pave the way for implementing cross-border digital prescriptions in other EU states as well.”

 

Estonia also wants to be one of the first to implement the exchange of patient history, as part of the EU’s e-Health Digital Service Infrastructure (eHDSI) project.

 

read more at https://emerging-europe.com/news/estonia-and-finland-sign-trailblazing-medication-deal/

 

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Why Apple, Google, Amazon hired cardiologists

Why Apple, Google, Amazon hired cardiologists | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
  • The world's largest technology companies have all hired well-known cardiologists.
  • Heart disease and high blood pressure affect a large number of people, are well-understood, and there's evidence that consumer products can help.

 

Big Silicon Valley companies have often competed for talent with specialized skills, like expertise in artificial intelligence or trendy new programming languages.

 

Now they're competing for heart doctors.

 

Apple, Alphabet, and Amazon have all hired well-known cardiologists.

 

This might just be a coincidence. Cardiologists tend to be well educated and hard working, and big tech companies have a track record of recruiting such people.

 

In recent years, all of these companies have started to invest in products and devices that are targeted to millions of people who could benefit by tracking their heart health.

 

Apple's smartwatch now includes an electrocardiogram, which can detect heart rhythm irregularities. Verily's study watch, which is designed for clinical trial research, also tracks heart rate and heart rhythm, and it's doing a lot of work in chronic disease management. 

 

So the more likely explanation is that tech companies are interested in health care, and they have all come to the conclusion that cardiology should be an early (if not initial) target.

 

Here's why.

 

 

It's a huge potential market

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer in the world, and strokes are among the leading causes of death.

 

And that's not all that cardiologists treat. "Our scope covers other common disease such as high blood pressure, which impacts about a third of people in the U.S. — 75 million Americans — as well as lipid and cholesterol disorders," said Dr. Mo Elshazly, a cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine.

 

Many cardiologists are also experts in nutrition and exercise science, which impacts a huge number of people who are committed to staying healthy.

 

That's useful for the teams within the largest tech companies that are more focused on wellness and fitness applications, rather than on health and medical.

 

Alphabet has Google Fit. Apple has a fitness group for its Apple Watch. And Amazon is looking at health and wellness applications for its Alexa voice assistant.

It's well-studied

Cardiology is among the most-studied fields in medicine, meaning there's already a lot of evidence to understand the root causes of heart disease, as well as how to prevent it. That's attractive for tech companies, which tend to base their development decisions on data.

Their consumer products are already making a difference

Let's take Apple, as an example. The company launched its first Apple Watch model with a heart rate sensor, never expecting that people would use it to discover they were pregnant, at risk for a heart attack or experiencing a dangerous irregular heart rhythm.

But as people began sharing examples of how the Apple Watch saved their life, the company started to invest heavily in the science and technology to drive more of these stories. A lot of that work culminated in the first-ever clearance for a heart rhythm sensor called an ECG for Apple Watch earlier in the summer.

 

 

read more at https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/17/what-every-tech-company-needs-a-cardiologist.html

 

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Virtual Assistant Eases EHR Distractions for Physicians 

Virtual Assistant Eases EHR Distractions for Physicians  | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

AI-powered smartphone app can reduce physician burnout, enhance patient experience

 

Virtual assistants are a fast-growing phenomenon, not only with the use of consumer products such as Amazon's Alexa, Google Assistant, and Apple's Siri, but as part of automated communications with many industries, such as airlines and banking. Market intelligence firm Research and Markets released a report earlier this year forecasting:

 

The healthcare market has lagged behind, but in September, Nuance and Epic released the first version of a conversational virtual assistant. It operates on Nuance's Dragon Medical cloud-based platform and is available through Epic Haiku, a mobile app for physicians that interfaces with the Epic EHR. The assistant is an upgrade to the app, used by physicians, which provides secure access to clinic schedules, hospital patient lists, health summaries, test results, and notes, while supporting dictation.

 

HOW VIRTUAL ASSISTANTS WILL CHANGE HEALTHCARE SHORT TERM 

According to Sean Bina, vice president of access applications for Epic, the assistant can answer questions such as:

  • What are the patient's A1c test results?
  • What medication is the patient taking?
  • What's my schedule for today?
  • Has the patient had a colonoscopy?

 

The immediate impact has the potential to reduce provider burnout, diminish difficulty locating information in the EHR, and change the physician-patient dynamic.

 

WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS

VUMC is taking the virtual assistant another step further and developing contextually useful summaries to provide an overview of relevant patient information for the physician to listen to before entering the exam room.

 

Among the other capabilities in development:

  • Medication and test ordering. While Dragon Medical currently has these capabilities built into its system, Epic has not yet activated this feature. During testing with Vanderbilt, the mean time for ordering medications via the virtual assistant was 17 seconds, compared to 50 seconds using the mobile app without voice assistance.
     
  • Decision support tools that could issue alerts, for example, if a patient has adverse reactions or allergies to medications the doctor orders.
     
  • A desktop version of the virtual assistant is planned by Nuance and Epic.

 

read the entire article at https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/innovation/virtual-assistant-eases-ehr-distractions-physicians

 

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Medical Device Cybersecurity - Regional Incident Preparedness and Response Playbook by MITRE for US FDA

Medical Device Cybersecurity - Regional Incident Preparedness and Response Playbook by MITRE for US FDA | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Cybersecurity attacks on Healthcare and Public Health (HPH) critical infrastructure, such as healthcare delivery organizations (HDOs), are occurring with greater frequency.  Disruptions in clinical care operations can put patients at risk.

Securing critical infrastucture is a shared responsibility across many stakeholders, and with respect to medical
devices the primary stakeholders are FDA, Medical Device Manufacturers (MDMs), and HDOs.

 

A common preparedness and response challenge FDA heard from its stakeholders in the aftermath of the aforementioned attacks is that

  • HDOs did not know with whom to communicate (e.g. MDM-HDO interactions);
  • what actions they might consider taking;
  • and what resources were available to aid in their response.

 

Without timely, accurate information and incorporation of medical device cybersecurity into their organizational emergency response plans, it was difficult for HDOs to assess and mitigate the impact of these attacks on their medical devices.

 

To address this unmet need, the MITRE team (with the support of FDA), engaged with a broad distribution of stakeholder groups to understand the gaps, challenges, and resources for HDOs participating in medical device cybersecurity preparedness and response activities.

 

Their efforts resulted in the creation of this playbook that may serve as a resource for HDOs.

 

The playbook provides a stakeholder-derived, open source, and customizable framework that HDOs may choose to leverage as a part of their emergency response plans in order to ultimately limit disruptions in continuity of clinical care as well as the potential for direct patient harm stemming from medical device cyber security incidents.

 

The link to the PDF of the first version of the playbook -> https://www.mitre.org/sites/default/files/publications/pr-18-1550-Medical-Device-Cybersecurity-Playbook.pdf

 

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Automation in Healthcare is Transforming Medicine #NHITWeek

Automation in Healthcare is Transforming Medicine #NHITWeek | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Information technology has allowed much of our economy to automate processes. We have seen transformations of the airline, banking, brokerage, entertainment, lodging, music, printing, publishing, shipping and taxi industries through the availability of massive volumes of real-time price and service data. Across America, consumer-facing retail service continues to shift to a virtual environment.

 

Healthcare is the exception. Many health information technology (health IT) products initially focused on billing.

The misalignment between billing support and the sense that these tools do not materially automate clinician work to build in efficiencies or improve workflows adds to an overall frustration with the increasing amount of time providers spend at their screens.

 

Automation is hard because it tends to require interfaces of various types – both to other machines (Internet of Things) and to humans.

 

Often automation proposals involve solutions that focus on highly structured data. But, someone or something has to put energy (physician salary, for example) into organizing much of this information, assuming it is even knowable.

 

The underlying disease or patient behavior (e.g., smoking) is also often not knowable. And, automation relying on machine to machine interfaces regularly runs into a lack of application programming interfaces (APIs) supporting complex clinical data flows.

 

I posted this week old piece now and now when it was published as #NHITWeek is this week. A lot of posts this week deal with possibilities and problems with healthcare focussed automation. 

 

The original unedited piece can be read at https://www.himss.org/news/healthcare-automation-transforming-medicine

nrip's insight:

I posted this week old piece now and now when it was published as #NHITWeek is this week. A lot of posts this week deal with possibilities and problems with healthcare focussed automation. 

 

What has your experience been , or your opinion on automation, and its uses in life sciences and medicine.

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BrainNet, an interface to communicate between human brains, could soon make Telepathy real

BrainNet, an interface to communicate between human brains, could soon make Telepathy real | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

BrainNet provides the first multi-person brain-to-brain interface which allows a nonthreatening direct collaboration between human brains. It can help small teams collaborate to solve a range of tasks using direct brain-to-brain communication.

How does BrainNet operate?

The noninvasive interface combines electroencephalography (EEG) to record brain signals and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to deliver the required information to the brain. F

 

For now, the interface allows three human subjects to collaborate, handle and solve a task using direct brain-to-brain communication.

 

Two out of three human subjects are “Senders”.

 

The senders’ brain signals are decoded using real-time EEG data analysis. This technique allows extracting decisions which are vital in communicating in order to solve the required challenges.

 

Let’s take an example of a Tetris-like game–where you need quick decisions to decide whether to rotate a block or drop as it is in order to fill a line.

 

The senders’ signals (decisions) are transmitted to the third subject human brain via the Internet, the “Receiver” in this case.

 

The decisions are sent to the receiver brain via magnetic stimulation of the occipital cortex.

 

The receiver can’t see the game screen to decide if the rotation of the block is required.

 

The receiver integrates the decisions received and makes an informed call using an EEG interface regarding turning the position of the block or keeping it in the same position.

 

The second round of the game allows the senders to validate the previous move and provide the necessary feedback to the receiver’s action.

 

more at https://hub.packtpub.com/brainnet-an-interface-to-communicate-between-human-brains-could-soon-make-telepathy-real/

 

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This Health Care AI Loves Terrible Software 

This Health Care AI Loves Terrible Software  | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Olive automates repetitive tasks and can match patients across databases at different hospitals

 

When Sean Lane, a former NSA operative who served five tours of duty in Afghanistan and Iraq, first entered into the health care-AI arena, he was overwhelmed with data silos, systems that don’t speak to each other, and many, many portals and screens.

 

“I was not going to create another screen,” Lane told a packed room on Monday at ApplySci’s annual health technology conference at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, Mass. 

 

Instead, Lane and a team taught an AI system to use software that already exists in health care just like a human would use it. They named it Olive.

 

“Olive loves all that crappy software that health care already has,” said Lane. “Olive can look at any software program, any application for the first time she’s ever seen it, and understand how to use it.”

 

For example, Olive navigates electronic medical records, logs into hospital portals, creates reports, files insurance claims, and more.

 

Olive does so thanks to three key traits. First, using computer vision and Robotic Process Automation, or RPA, the program can interact with any software interface just as a human would, opening browsers and typing. Second, machine learning enables Olive to make decisions the way human health care workers do. The team trained Olive with historical data on how health care workers perform digital tasks, such as how to file an insurance eligibility check for a patient seeking to undergo a procedure.

 

Finally, Olive relies on a unique skill that Lane developed based on his work at the NSA identifying criminals across disparate government sources—the ability to match identities across databases. Just as NSA software can determine if a terrorist in the CIA database is the same as in the Homeland Security database, so Olive matches a patient across disparate databases and software, such as multiple electronic health care record programs.

 

Read the full article at https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/computing/software/this-healthcare-ai-loves-crappy-software

 

 

nrip's insight:

I loved this article when I read it first a few days back. This kind of an approach creates so many interesting opportunities for healthcare.

Olive automates repetitive tasks and can match patients across databases at different hospitals.

 

Would you want to create Olive Bots? Would you like to buy Olive bots? Tell us in the comments below, or use the form to contact us.

-

Nrip

 

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FDA Unveils Plan for ‘Software as a Medical Device’ Review

FDA Unveils Plan for ‘Software as a Medical Device’ Review | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration is proposing to pre-certify vendors of certain medical device software, including various mobile apps, allowing the companies to skip the agency's much more rigorous pre-market approval process for hardware-based medical devices.

 

The proposed voluntary program is for review of "software-as-a-medical-device" products, or SaMD - software that is "intended to treat, diagnose, cure, mitigate or prevent disease or other conditions." Today, such software faces the same regulatory review as medical device hardware.

 

Examples of SaMD range from software that allows a smartphone to view images obtained from a MRI for diagnostic purposes to computer-aided detection software used to help detect breast cancer.

 

The FDA says its current regulation of medical device hardware "is not well-suited for the faster, iterative design, development, and type of validation used for SaMD," according to the agency's draft "working model" document spelling out its proposals.

 

more at: https://www.govinfosecurity.com/fda-unveils-plan-for-software-as-medical-device-review-a-10925

 

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The EHR Interoperability Challenge - an interview, an overview

The EHR interoperability challenge is what stands between a physician's ability to look up, extract, and track a patient's medical activities and records at medical sites other than their own. This could be at a laboratory where a patient's specialty blood work is being analyzed or they're having surgery on an inpatient or outpatient basis.

 

When it comes to tracking these patients, it's literally as they move about in the sphere of the healthcare world. The interoperability challenge occurs because you need your EHR to talk to systems outside your practice.

 

Solving this challenge means maintaining continuity of care for patients, minimizing or eliminating the duplicity of services, and helping physicians share patient information so they can gain insight from specialists that would complement their diagnoses.

 

Many EHR companies aren't willing to share access to their systems unless a physician is part of their overall user base. If you work in a particular hospital or practice that has their product, these particular companies will share information with physicians. The problem is they won't work with peripheral players, or physicians who are unaffiliated with the hospital or practice where their EHR is installed.

 

Why is it in the hospital's interest to provide access to patients via their EHR?

 

Sharing access to patients via the hospital's EHR creates a win-win situation where the hospital can keep the patient in their system.

 

these are excerpts from an interview David Wasserman, an advisor with the practice solutions and medical economics group at the Massachusetts Medical Society.

 

read more at the original  http://www.diagnosticimaging.com/ehr/solving-ehr-interoperability-challenge

 

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