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ESA’s Solar Orbiter spacecraft has launched to study the sun

ESA’s Solar Orbiter spacecraft has launched to study the sun | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
ESA's Solar Orbiter is now on its way to the sun, beginning a nearly two-year journey.

 

A new sungazing spacecraft has launched on a mission to chart the sun’s unexplored polar regions and to understand how our star creates and controls the vast bubble of plasma that envelops the solar system.

 

At 11:03 pm ET on February 9, 2020, the European Space Agency’s Solar Orbiter rocketed away from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The spacecraft now begins a nearly two-year convoluted journey — getting two gravity assists from Venus and one from Earth — to an orbit that will repeatedly take it a bit closer to the sun than Mercury gets.

 

 


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NASA’s OSIRIS-REX Spacecraft Completes Touch-Down on Bennu Asteroid

NASA’s OSIRIS-REX Spacecraft Completes Touch-Down on Bennu Asteroid | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

The spacecraft attempted to suck up rocks and dirt from the asteroid, which could aid humanity’s ability to divert one that might slam into Earth.

 

[How much of Bennu did NASA’s OSIRIS-REX collect? We’re waiting to find out.]

 

A NASA robot pogo-sticked off an asteroid on Tuesday and grabbed a sample of dirt and rocks, material that could give scientists new insights to the birth of the solar system.

From first impressions recorded 200 millions away on Earth, the OSIRIS-REX spacecraft pulled off its collection of bits of asteroid, a carbon-rich rock known as Bennu, perfectly. It then backed away and headed back to orbit.

 

“Transcendental,” Dante Lauretta, the principal investigator of the mission, said moments later. “I mean, I can’t believe we actually pulled this off.”

 

It will take a few more days before scientists can completely declare success. At present, they can only say that the spacecraft executed its instructions exactly as programmed. What is not yet known is how much material was actually grabbed. Scientists are hoping for at least a couple of ounces, but the sampling mechanism can hold up to four pounds. “It’s up to Bennu now to see how the event went,” Dr. Lauretta said. If it succeeded in its goal of sucking up some rocks and dirt from the asteroid’s surface, it could potentially unlock secrets to what the solar system was like when it first formed 4.5 billion years ago.

 

“The asteroids are like time capsules, floating in space, that can provide a fossil record of the birth of our solar system,” Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s planetary science division, said during a news conference on Monday. Many asteroids — including Bennu — cross the orbit of Earth and could collide with our planet someday. A better understanding of these space rocks, which come in many types, could aid humanity’s ability to divert one that might slam into Earth.

 

The name OSIRIS-REX is a shortening of Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer.


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Famous shadow of black hole provides novel test for new theories of gravity

Famous shadow of black hole provides novel test for new theories of gravity | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Outwitting Albert Einstein just got even tougher. More than 100 years ago, the famous physicist published his explanation of gravity, known as general relativity (GR), which successfully explains everything from the orbits of planets to the bending of starlight. Still, some physicists have been trying to invent theories that can solve puzzles GR cannot—for example, by explaining away the need for invisible dark matter, whose gravity appears to bind the galaxies. But the first direct image of a black hole, revealed last year, has now provided a tough new test for theories of gravity. Fail it and your theory is dead. “It’s a new hoop to jump through and a fairly narrow one,” says Feryal Özel, an astrophysicist at the University of Arizona who helped devise the new test.

 

 

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Nokia wins NASA contract to put a 4G network on the moon | #Space

Nokia wins NASA contract to put a 4G network on the moon | #Space | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Soon, astronauts on moon missions won't have any excuse for not answering their texts.

NASA has awarded Nokia of America $14.1 million to deploy a cellular network on the moon. The freaking moon. The grant is part of $370 million worth of contracts signed under NASA's "Tipping Point" selections, meant to advance research and development for space exploration. 

Nokia's plan is to build a 4G/LTE network, and eventually transition to 5G (just like the rest of us). It will be "the first LTE/4G communications system in space," according to NASA's announcement.

"The system could support lunar surface communications at greater distances, increased speeds, and provide more reliability than current standards," the announcement also reads.

 


Via Gust MEES
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 17, 4:00 PM

Soon, astronauts on moon missions won't have any excuse for not answering their texts.

NASA has awarded Nokia of America $14.1 million to deploy a cellular network on the moon. The freaking moon. The grant is part of $370 million worth of contracts signed under NASA's "Tipping Point" selections, meant to advance research and development for space exploration. 

Nokia's plan is to build a 4G/LTE network, and eventually transition to 5G (just like the rest of us). It will be "the first LTE/4G communications system in space," according to NASA's announcement.

"The system could support lunar surface communications at greater distances, increased speeds, and provide more reliability than current standards," the announcement also reads.

 

Learn more / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Space

 

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Researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material

Researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Compressing simple molecular solids with hydrogen at extremely high pressures, University of Rochester engineers and physicists have, for the first time, created material that is superconducting at room temperature.
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Physicists develop a method to improve gravitational wave detector sensitivity by removing quantum backaction

Physicists develop a method to improve gravitational wave detector sensitivity by removing quantum backaction | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Gravitational wave detectors have opened a new window to the universe by measuring the ripples in spacetime produced by colliding black holes and neutron stars, but they are ultimately limited by quantum fluctuations induced by light reflecting off of mirrors. LSU Ph.D. physics alumnus Jonathan Cripe and his team of LSU researchers have conducted a new experiment with scientists from Caltech and Thorlabs to explore a way to cancel this quantum backaction and improve detector sensitivity.

 

 


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Cool Physics Experiment Proves Dice Like to be Shaken, Not Stirred

Cool Physics Experiment Proves Dice Like to be Shaken, Not Stirred | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Turns out that dice like to be shaken, not stirred. Don't believe us? See for yourself in this cool physics experiment with 25,000 miniature dice.
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Gateway to the Past: An Adventure into Computer Tech History

Gateway to the Past: An Adventure into Computer Tech History | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Explore the history of computers + micro-electronics technology at the virtual museum called Chips etc. — 1,000 rare parts from the world’s foremost electronics + semi-conductor companies.

 

People from every generation have a fascination with the evolution of computers: whether it’s chips, computer hardware, or ephemera. Both specialists and amateurs — hobbyist, makers, historians, engineers, and scientists — enjoy vintage computer parts. Since computing first began in the 20th century, the field has been progressing in leaps + bounds — making these historic markers of the past even more interesting. 

 

 


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New Artificial Intelligence Platform Uses Deep Learning to Diagnose Dystonia with High Accuracy in Less Than One Second

New Artificial Intelligence Platform Uses Deep Learning to Diagnose Dystonia with High Accuracy in Less Than One Second | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Researchers at Mass Eye and Ear have developed a unique diagnostic tool that can detect dystonia from MRI scans, the first technology of its kind to provide an objective diagnosis of the disorder. Dystonia is a potentially disabling neurological condition that causes involuntary muscle contractions, leading to abnormal movements and postures. It is often misdiagnosed and can take people up to 10 years to get a correct diagnosis.

 

In a new study published September 28 in PNAS, researchers developed an AI-based deep learning platform -called DystoniaNet - to compare brain MRIs of 612 people, including 392 patients with three different forms of isolated focal dystonia and 220 healthy individuals. The platform diagnosed dystonia with 98.8 percent accuracy. During the process, the researchers identified a new microstructural neural network biological marker of dystonia. With further testing and validation, they believe DystoniaNet can be easily integrated into clinical decision-making.


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Covid-19 Long-Term Effects: Some Patients Need Very Long-Term Care

Covid-19 Long-Term Effects: Some Patients Need Very Long-Term Care | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Like many other illnesses, Covid-19 can cause enduring problems. Some victims report serious symptoms weeks and months after infection, even many who were never ill enough to be hospitalized. Nearly 100 different long-term problems, detailed in the chart below, were reported to Indiana University Medical School researcher Natalie Lambert, in a survey of more than 1,500 patients. Some of these issues go well beyond typical Covid-19 symptoms.


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Computational modeling explains why blues and greens are brightest structural colors in nature

Computational modeling explains why blues and greens are brightest structural colors in nature | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Cambridge used a numerical experiment to determine the limits of matt structural color – a phenomenon which is responsible for some of the most intense colors in nature – and found that it extends only as far as blue and green in the visible spectrum. The results, published in PNAS, could be useful in the development of non-toxic paints or coatings with intense color that never fades.

 

Structural color, which is seen in some bird feathers, butterfly wings or insects, is not caused by pigments or dyes, but internal structure alone. The appearance of the color, whether matt or iridescent, will depending on how the structures are arranged at the nanoscale.

 


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Flying car successfully tested in Japan | #Research

Flying car successfully tested in Japan | #Research | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

(CNN)A Japanese company has announced the successful test drive of a flying car.

Sky Drive Inc. conducted the public demonstration on August 25, the company said in a news release, at the Toyota Test Field, one of the largest in Japan and home to the car company's development base. It was the first public demonstration for a flying car in Japanese history.
The car, named SD-03, manned with a pilot, took off and circled the field for about four minutes.
"We are extremely excited to have achieved Japan's first-ever manned flight of a flying car in the two years since we founded SkyDrive... with the goal of commercializing such aircraft," CEO Tomohiro Fukuzawa said in a statement.


Via Gust MEES
Gust MEES's curator insight, September 17, 6:17 AM

(CNN)A Japanese company has announced the successful test drive of a flying car.

Sky Drive Inc. conducted the public demonstration on August 25, the company said in a news release, at the Toyota Test Field, one of the largest in Japan and home to the car company's development base. It was the first public demonstration for a flying car in Japanese history.
The car, named SD-03, manned with a pilot, took off and circled the field for about four minutes.
"We are extremely excited to have achieved Japan's first-ever manned flight of a flying car in the two years since we founded SkyDrive... with the goal of commercializing such aircraft," CEO Tomohiro Fukuzawa said in a statement.

What's more fancy than a Porsche? A flying Porsche. Luxury automakers race to perfect the flying car
"We want to realize a society where flying cars are an accessible and convenient means of transportation in the skies and people are able to experience a safe, secure, and comfortable new way of life.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/topic/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Flying

 

 

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Artificial intelligence yields new antibiotic never seen before

Artificial intelligence yields new antibiotic never seen before | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Using a new machine-learning algorithm, MIT researchers have identified a powerful antibiotic that can kill a wide range of species of pathogenic bacteria, including some that are resistant to all known antibiotics.

 

The computer model, which can screen more than a hundred million chemical compounds in a matter of days, is designed to pick out potential antibiotics that kill bacteria using different mechanisms than those of existing drugs. "We wanted to develop a platform that would allow us to harness the power of artificial intelligence to usher in a new age of antibiotic drug discovery," says James Collins, the Termeer Professor of Medical Engineering and Science in MIT's Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) and Department of Biological Engineering. "Our approach revealed this amazing molecule which is arguably one of the more powerful antibiotics that has been discovered."

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Jane Walkinshaw's curator insight, September 14, 7:49 PM
This seems like a huge step in medicine/treatment, it's crazy to think that someone could come up with a new antibody to combat resilient bacteria by use of a computor model!
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Sensitive robots – New electronic skin can react to pain like human skin

Sensitive robots – New electronic skin can react to pain like human skin | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Artificial skin reacts to pain just like real skin, opening the way to better prosthetics, smarter robotics and less invasive options for skin grafts.

 

Researchers have developed electronic artificial skin that reacts to pain just like real skin, opening the way to better prosthetics, smarter robotics and non-invasive alternatives to skin grafts. The prototype device developed by a team at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, can electronically replicate the way human skin senses pain. The device mimics the body's near-instant feedback response and can react to painful sensations with the same lighting speed that nerve signals travel to the brain.

 

 

 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Richard Platt's curator insight, September 12, 1:17 PM

Artificial skin reacts to pain just like real skin, opening the way to better prosthetics, smarter robotics, and less invasive options for skin grafts. Researchers have developed electronic artificial skin that reacts to pain just like real skin, opening the way to better prosthetics, smarter robotics, and non-invasive alternatives to skin grafts. The prototype device developed by a team at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, can electronically replicate the way human skin senses pain. The device mimics the body's near-instant feedback response and can react to painful sensations with the same lighting speed that nerve signals travel to the brain. The pain-sensing prototype was a significant advance towards next-generation biomedical technologies and intelligent robotics. "Skin is our body's largest sensory organ, with complex features designed to send rapid-fire warning signals when anything hurts," Bhaskaran said. "We're sensing things all the time through the skin but our pain response only kicks in at a certain point, like when we touch something too hot or too sharp. No electronic technologies have been able to realistically mimic that very human feeling of pain -- until now. Our artificial skin reacts instantly when pressure, heat, or cold reach a painful threshold. It's a critical step forward in the future development of the sophisticated feedback systems that we need to deliver truly smart prosthetics and intelligent robotics."

Richard Platt's curator insight, September 12, 1:31 PM

Artificial skin reacts to pain just like real skin, opening the way to better prosthetics, smarter robotics, and less invasive options for skin grafts. The pain-sensing prototype was a significant advance towards next-generation biomedical technologies and intelligent robotics. "Skin is our body's largest sensory organ, with complex features designed to send rapid-fire warning signals when anything hurts," Bhaskaran said. "We're sensing things all the time through the skin but our pain response only kicks in at a certain point, like when we touch something too hot or too sharp. No electronic technologies have been able to realistically mimic that very human feeling of pain -- until now. Our artificial skin reacts instantly when pressure, heat, or cold reach a painful threshold. It's a critical step forward in the future development of the sophisticated feedback systems that we need to deliver truly smart prosthetics and intelligent robotics."

Yasmin Afmeged's curator insight, September 12, 5:30 PM
This could really help burn victims or people with skin injury/illness. It's really interesting how they developed it as well. 
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A potential therapy for treating COVID-19 by blocking the virus from the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor and inhibiting it from entering cells

A potential therapy for treating COVID-19 by blocking the virus from the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor and inhibiting it from entering cells | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

An international team has found a way to potentially prevent the novel coronavirus from infecting cells, as well as clues as to why it is more infectious than similar viruses.

 

University of Bristol researchers Dr Yohei Yamauchi and Professor Peter Cullen identified where the virus binds when it is infecting host cells and then joined forces with Dr Kai-En (Kevin) Chen and Professor Brett Collins from IMB to find out more.

 

Putting more pieces of the puzzle together, Dr Chen and Professor Collins were able to show exactly how the virus binds to a host cell by modelling the site where they interact. “The SARS-CoV-2 virus uses a protein called Spike to bind and enter host cells, and we now know that in addition to the already known ACE2 receptor, the Spike binds to a second receptor on the host cells called neuropilin,” Professor Collins said. “We used X-ray crystallography to see the structure of proteins at the atomic level and visualize the binding sites at a spectacular level of detail.”

 

The University of Bristol team then looked at the effect of disrupting the binding between the virus and the second receptor.

"We discovered that by blocking the virus protein from binding neurophilin on the cells, it was possible to reduce the infection rate of the virus," Dr Yamauchi said. “If we can make a drug that blocks the virus from binding to cells, this has potential as a new therapy for treating COVID-19."


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A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Dark Matter

A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Dark Matter | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have proposed a novel method for finding dark matter, the cosmos’s mystery material that has eluded detection for decades. Dark matter makes up about 27% of the universe; ordinary matter, such as the stuff that builds stars and planets, accounts for just 5% of the cosmos. A mysterious entity called dark energy, accounts for the other 68%.

 

According to cosmologists, all the visible material in the universe is merely floating in a vast sea of dark matter — particles that are invisible but nonetheless have mass and exert a gravitational force. Dark matter’s gravity would provide the missing glue that keeps galaxies from falling apart and account for how matter clumped together to form the universe’s rich galactic tapestry. 

 

 

 


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