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What Do We Really Know About the Universe?

What Do We Really Know About the Universe? | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
The word “Universe” comes from the Latin “Universum”, which was used by Roman authors to refer to the cosmos as they knew them. This consisted of the Earth and all life as well as the Moon, the Sun, the planets that they knew about (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn) and the stars.

The term “cosmos”, on the other hand, is derived from the Greek word kosmos, which means "order" or “the world”. Other words commonly used to define all of known-existence include “Nature” (from the Germanic word natur) and the English word “everything” (self-explanatory).

Today, the word Universe is used by scientists to refer to all existing matter and space. This includes the Solar System, the Milky Way, all known galaxies, and superstructures. In terms of modern science and astrophysics, it also includes all time, space, matter, energy, and the fundamental forces that bind them.

Cosmology, on the other hand, is used to describe the study of the Universe (or cosmos) and the forces that bind it. Thanks to thousands of years of scholarship, what we know about the physical Universe has grown by leaps and bounds. And yet, there is still so much that we don't understand.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Design, Comm, Sci and Tech
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A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Dark Matter

A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Dark Matter | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have proposed a novel method for finding dark matter, the cosmos’s mystery material that has eluded detection for decades. Dark matter makes up about 27% of the universe; ordinary matter, such as the stuff that builds stars and planets, accounts for just 5% of the cosmos. A mysterious entity called dark energy, accounts for the other 68%.

 

According to cosmologists, all the visible material in the universe is merely floating in a vast sea of dark matter — particles that are invisible but nonetheless have mass and exert a gravitational force. Dark matter’s gravity would provide the missing glue that keeps galaxies from falling apart and account for how matter clumped together to form the universe’s rich galactic tapestry. 

 

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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World's smallest camera is the size of a grain of sand

World's smallest camera is the size of a grain of sand | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
OmniVision OV6948 enters the Guinness Book of Records as the world's smallest camera.

 

OmniVision OV6948 measures in super-small at just 0.575 x 0.575 x 0.232mm and is good for 40,000-pixel color images using an RGB Bayer back-side-illuminating chip. This new camera is ridiculosuly small, but it's for specific use cases in surgery.

With the OmniVision OV6948 surgeons can have a camera so small it will fit into the smallest veins inside of the human body.

 

This technology provides surgeons and doctors that have the OmniVision OV6948 with next-gen camera access for future surgeries. Until now, surgeons do this without any camera -- acting blind. The only cameras capable of anything close to this are very few, but they also have a much lower resolution fiber optic feed. The new OmniVision OV6948 captures images at 30FPS, and can have analog output at over 4mm away with minimal noise.

 

The OmniVision OV6948 has a 120-degree super-side angle field of view, something that on a regular camera would come up as 14nm on a full-frame sensor. The depth of field for the OmniVision OV6948 spans between 3mm and 30mm.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Elon Musk says Starlink now has enough satellites in orbit to launch a public beta of its high-speed internet service | Business Insider

Elon Musk says Starlink now has enough satellites in orbit to launch a public beta of its high-speed internet service | Business Insider | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Elon Musk’s goal of beaming high-speed internet to remote parts of Earth using orbiting satellites just got a step closer to reality.
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New Cargo Ship: Wind-Powered Sailboat Can Carry 7,000 Cars

New Cargo Ship: Wind-Powered Sailboat Can Carry 7,000 Cars | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
A wind-powered super sailboat could change how we ship cargo—and seriously slash carbon emissions. Here's what it looks like.
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Destination Earth : Europe is building a ‘digital twin’ of Earth to revolutionize climate forecasts

Destination Earth : Europe is building a ‘digital twin’ of Earth to revolutionize climate forecasts | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Ingesting more data than ever, exascale model will simulate the impact of climate change on humans

 

The European Union is finalizing plans for an ambitious “digital twin” of planet Earth that would simulate the atmosphere, ocean, ice, and land with unrivaled precision, providing forecasts of floods, droughts, and fires from days to years in advance.

 

 


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NASA/ESA: New Hubble Data Suggests There is an Ingredient Missing from Current Dark Matter Theories

NASA/ESA: New Hubble Data Suggests There is an Ingredient Missing from Current Dark Matter Theories | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Observations by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile have found that something may be missing from the theories of how dark matter behaves. This missing ingredient may explain why researchers have uncovered an unexpected discrepancy between observations of the dark matter concentrations in a sample of massive galaxy clusters and theoretical computer simulations of how dark matter should be distributed in clusters. The new finding indicates that some small-scale concentrations of dark matter produce lensing effects that are 10 times stronger than expected.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Time Travel Is Possible: Math Proves Paradox-Free Time Travel

Time Travel Is Possible: Math Proves Paradox-Free Time Travel | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
A college student has mathematically proven the physical feasibility of paradox-free time travel. Does this mean we can all go back to 2019?
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Most Americans to be vaccinated for COVID-19 by July 2021, CDC chief expects

Most Americans to be vaccinated for COVID-19 by July 2021, CDC chief expects | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
A top U.S. health official told a U.S. Senate committee on Wednesday that he expects COVID-19 vaccinations to take place over many months and that most Americans could be vaccinated by July of 2021 at the latest.

 

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention head Robert Redfield said he expects there to be about 700 million doses of vaccines available by late March or April, enough for 350 million people. “I think that’s going to take us April, May, June, you know, possibly July, to get the entire American public completely vaccinated,” Redfield told the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Microbial life on Venus? Phosphine gas in clouds of Venus detected

Microbial life on Venus? Phosphine gas in clouds of Venus detected | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Measurements of trace gases in planetary atmospheres help us explore chemical conditions different to those on Earth. Our nearest neighbor planet, Venus, has clouds that are temperate but hyperacidic. Here we report the apparent presence of phosphine (PH3) gas in Venus’s atmosphere, where any phosphorus should be in oxidized forms. Single-line millimeter-waveband spectral detections (quality up to ~15σ) from the JCMT and ALMA telescopes have no other plausible identification.

 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The phosphine discovered in Venus' clouds may be a big deal. Here's what you need to know. | Space

The phosphine discovered in Venus' clouds may be a big deal. Here's what you need to know. | Space | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

A chemical you've likely never heard of has burst into the news thanks to scientists' announcement that they have detected phosphine, which they say may be a sign of life, in the clouds of Venus.

Here's everything you need to know about phosphine, the strange chemical detected in the atmosphere of Venus.

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A.I. Tool Promises Faster, More Accurate Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

A.I. Tool Promises Faster, More Accurate Alzheimer’s Diagnosis | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

By detecting subtle differences in the way that Alzheimer’s sufferers use language, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed an A.I. algorithm that promises to accurately diagnose Alzheimer’s without the need for expensive scans or in-person testing. The software not only can diagnose Alzheimer’s, at negligible cost, with more than 95 percent accuracy, but is also capable of explaining its conclusions, allowing physicians to double check the accuracy of its diagnosis.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mark Sagar: how humans will interact with machines in ten years

Mark Sagar: how humans will interact with machines in ten years | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

In ten years artificially intelligent robots will be living and working with us, according to Dr. Mark Sagar, CEO of Soul Machines, an Auckland, New Zealand-based company that develops intelligent, emotionally responsive avatars.

 

Sagar, an AI engineer, is the inventor of a virtual nervous system that powers autonomous animated avatars like Baby X — a virtual infant that learns through experience and can “feel” emotions.

 

“We are creating realistic adult avatars serving as virtual assistants. You can use them to plug into existing systems like IBM Watson or Cortana — putting a face on a chatbot,” said Sagar.

Within a decade humans will be interacting with lifelike emotionally-responsive AI robots, very similar to the premise of the the HBO hit series Westworld, said Sagar.

 

But before that scenario becomes a reality robotics will have to catch up to AI technology. “Robotics technology is not really at the level of control that’s required,” he said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Overview Timelapse: A New Book Documents Vast Changes to the Earth’s Surface by Human Hands

Overview Timelapse: A New Book Documents Vast Changes to the Earth’s Surface by Human Hands | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
In a follow-up to the 2016 book Overview featuring stunning imagery of the Earth from above, Overview Timelapse: How We Change the Earth takes a critical look at the numerous ways humans have completely altered the surface of our planet in a very short time through urban development, climate change,

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Nokia wins NASA contract to put a 4G network on the moon | #Space

Nokia wins NASA contract to put a 4G network on the moon | #Space | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Soon, astronauts on moon missions won't have any excuse for not answering their texts.

NASA has awarded Nokia of America $14.1 million to deploy a cellular network on the moon. The freaking moon. The grant is part of $370 million worth of contracts signed under NASA's "Tipping Point" selections, meant to advance research and development for space exploration. 

Nokia's plan is to build a 4G/LTE network, and eventually transition to 5G (just like the rest of us). It will be "the first LTE/4G communications system in space," according to NASA's announcement.

"The system could support lunar surface communications at greater distances, increased speeds, and provide more reliability than current standards," the announcement also reads.

 


Via Gust MEES
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 17, 4:00 PM

Soon, astronauts on moon missions won't have any excuse for not answering their texts.

NASA has awarded Nokia of America $14.1 million to deploy a cellular network on the moon. The freaking moon. The grant is part of $370 million worth of contracts signed under NASA's "Tipping Point" selections, meant to advance research and development for space exploration. 

Nokia's plan is to build a 4G/LTE network, and eventually transition to 5G (just like the rest of us). It will be "the first LTE/4G communications system in space," according to NASA's announcement.

"The system could support lunar surface communications at greater distances, increased speeds, and provide more reliability than current standards," the announcement also reads.

 

Learn more / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Space

 

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Researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material

Researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Compressing simple molecular solids with hydrogen at extremely high pressures, University of Rochester engineers and physicists have, for the first time, created material that is superconducting at room temperature.
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Physicists develop a method to improve gravitational wave detector sensitivity by removing quantum backaction

Physicists develop a method to improve gravitational wave detector sensitivity by removing quantum backaction | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Gravitational wave detectors have opened a new window to the universe by measuring the ripples in spacetime produced by colliding black holes and neutron stars, but they are ultimately limited by quantum fluctuations induced by light reflecting off of mirrors. LSU Ph.D. physics alumnus Jonathan Cripe and his team of LSU researchers have conducted a new experiment with scientists from Caltech and Thorlabs to explore a way to cancel this quantum backaction and improve detector sensitivity.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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