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Big Water Survey

Big Water Survey | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Help the Environment

 These designers are working for a cause and need your help.

Clean water, No plastic.  

 Can you help them? Answer the questions and share the link. 

7 questions in 30 seconds of your time, no sensitive data asked. 

https://water.stop.zone

 

*Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

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https://water.stop.zone

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Water on the Moon could sustain a lunar base | #Space #Research

Water on the Moon could sustain a lunar base | #Space #Research | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Having dropped tantalising hints days ago about an "exciting new discovery about the Moon", the US space agency has revealed conclusive evidence of water on our only natural satellite.

This "unambiguous detection of molecular water" will boost Nasa's hopes of establishing a lunar base.

The aim is to sustain that base by tapping into the Moon's natural resources.

The findings have been published as two papers in the journal Nature Astronomy.

While there have previously been signs of water on the lunar surface, these new discoveries suggest it is more abundant than previously thought. "It gives us more options for potential water sources on the Moon," said Hannah Sargeant, a planetary scientist from the Open University in Milton Keynes, told BBC News.

 

Learn more / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Space

 


Via Gust MEES
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 26, 12:34 PM

Having dropped tantalising hints days ago about an "exciting new discovery about the Moon", the US space agency has revealed conclusive evidence of water on our only natural satellite.

This "unambiguous detection of molecular water" will boost Nasa's hopes of establishing a lunar base.

The aim is to sustain that base by tapping into the Moon's natural resources.

The findings have been published as two papers in the journal Nature Astronomy.

While there have previously been signs of water on the lunar surface, these new discoveries suggest it is more abundant than previously thought. "It gives us more options for potential water sources on the Moon," said Hannah Sargeant, a planetary scientist from the Open University in Milton Keynes, told BBC News.

 

Learn more / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Space

 

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News | Impact Craters Reveal Details of Titan's Dynamic Surface Weathering

News | Impact Craters Reveal Details of Titan's Dynamic Surface Weathering | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
New research on nine craters of Saturn's largest moon provides more details about how weathering affects the evolution of the surface - and what lies beneath.
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A potential therapy for treating COVID-19 by blocking the virus from the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor and inhibiting it from entering cells

A potential therapy for treating COVID-19 by blocking the virus from the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor and inhibiting it from entering cells | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

An international team has found a way to potentially prevent the novel coronavirus from infecting cells, as well as clues as to why it is more infectious than similar viruses.

 

University of Bristol researchers Dr Yohei Yamauchi and Professor Peter Cullen identified where the virus binds when it is infecting host cells and then joined forces with Dr Kai-En (Kevin) Chen and Professor Brett Collins from IMB to find out more.

 

Putting more pieces of the puzzle together, Dr Chen and Professor Collins were able to show exactly how the virus binds to a host cell by modelling the site where they interact. “The SARS-CoV-2 virus uses a protein called Spike to bind and enter host cells, and we now know that in addition to the already known ACE2 receptor, the Spike binds to a second receptor on the host cells called neuropilin,” Professor Collins said. “We used X-ray crystallography to see the structure of proteins at the atomic level and visualize the binding sites at a spectacular level of detail.”

 

The University of Bristol team then looked at the effect of disrupting the binding between the virus and the second receptor.

"We discovered that by blocking the virus protein from binding neurophilin on the cells, it was possible to reduce the infection rate of the virus," Dr Yamauchi said. “If we can make a drug that blocks the virus from binding to cells, this has potential as a new therapy for treating COVID-19."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Dark Matter

A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Dark Matter | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have proposed a novel method for finding dark matter, the cosmos’s mystery material that has eluded detection for decades. Dark matter makes up about 27% of the universe; ordinary matter, such as the stuff that builds stars and planets, accounts for just 5% of the cosmos. A mysterious entity called dark energy, accounts for the other 68%.

 

According to cosmologists, all the visible material in the universe is merely floating in a vast sea of dark matter — particles that are invisible but nonetheless have mass and exert a gravitational force. Dark matter’s gravity would provide the missing glue that keeps galaxies from falling apart and account for how matter clumped together to form the universe’s rich galactic tapestry. 

 

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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World's smallest camera is the size of a grain of sand

World's smallest camera is the size of a grain of sand | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
OmniVision OV6948 enters the Guinness Book of Records as the world's smallest camera.

 

OmniVision OV6948 measures in super-small at just 0.575 x 0.575 x 0.232mm and is good for 40,000-pixel color images using an RGB Bayer back-side-illuminating chip. This new camera is ridiculosuly small, but it's for specific use cases in surgery.

With the OmniVision OV6948 surgeons can have a camera so small it will fit into the smallest veins inside of the human body.

 

This technology provides surgeons and doctors that have the OmniVision OV6948 with next-gen camera access for future surgeries. Until now, surgeons do this without any camera -- acting blind. The only cameras capable of anything close to this are very few, but they also have a much lower resolution fiber optic feed. The new OmniVision OV6948 captures images at 30FPS, and can have analog output at over 4mm away with minimal noise.

 

The OmniVision OV6948 has a 120-degree super-side angle field of view, something that on a regular camera would come up as 14nm on a full-frame sensor. The depth of field for the OmniVision OV6948 spans between 3mm and 30mm.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Elon Musk says Starlink now has enough satellites in orbit to launch a public beta of its high-speed internet service | Business Insider

Elon Musk says Starlink now has enough satellites in orbit to launch a public beta of its high-speed internet service | Business Insider | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Elon Musk’s goal of beaming high-speed internet to remote parts of Earth using orbiting satellites just got a step closer to reality.
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New Cargo Ship: Wind-Powered Sailboat Can Carry 7,000 Cars

New Cargo Ship: Wind-Powered Sailboat Can Carry 7,000 Cars | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
A wind-powered super sailboat could change how we ship cargo—and seriously slash carbon emissions. Here's what it looks like.
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Destination Earth : Europe is building a ‘digital twin’ of Earth to revolutionize climate forecasts

Destination Earth : Europe is building a ‘digital twin’ of Earth to revolutionize climate forecasts | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
Ingesting more data than ever, exascale model will simulate the impact of climate change on humans

 

The European Union is finalizing plans for an ambitious “digital twin” of planet Earth that would simulate the atmosphere, ocean, ice, and land with unrivaled precision, providing forecasts of floods, droughts, and fires from days to years in advance.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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NASA/ESA: New Hubble Data Suggests There is an Ingredient Missing from Current Dark Matter Theories

NASA/ESA: New Hubble Data Suggests There is an Ingredient Missing from Current Dark Matter Theories | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Observations by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile have found that something may be missing from the theories of how dark matter behaves. This missing ingredient may explain why researchers have uncovered an unexpected discrepancy between observations of the dark matter concentrations in a sample of massive galaxy clusters and theoretical computer simulations of how dark matter should be distributed in clusters. The new finding indicates that some small-scale concentrations of dark matter produce lensing effects that are 10 times stronger than expected.

 

 


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Time Travel Is Possible: Math Proves Paradox-Free Time Travel

Time Travel Is Possible: Math Proves Paradox-Free Time Travel | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
A college student has mathematically proven the physical feasibility of paradox-free time travel. Does this mean we can all go back to 2019?
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Most Americans to be vaccinated for COVID-19 by July 2021, CDC chief expects

Most Americans to be vaccinated for COVID-19 by July 2021, CDC chief expects | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it
A top U.S. health official told a U.S. Senate committee on Wednesday that he expects COVID-19 vaccinations to take place over many months and that most Americans could be vaccinated by July of 2021 at the latest.

 

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention head Robert Redfield said he expects there to be about 700 million doses of vaccines available by late March or April, enough for 350 million people. “I think that’s going to take us April, May, June, you know, possibly July, to get the entire American public completely vaccinated,” Redfield told the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

 


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Microbial life on Venus? Phosphine gas in clouds of Venus detected

Microbial life on Venus? Phosphine gas in clouds of Venus detected | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Measurements of trace gases in planetary atmospheres help us explore chemical conditions different to those on Earth. Our nearest neighbor planet, Venus, has clouds that are temperate but hyperacidic. Here we report the apparent presence of phosphine (PH3) gas in Venus’s atmosphere, where any phosphorus should be in oxidized forms. Single-line millimeter-waveband spectral detections (quality up to ~15σ) from the JCMT and ALMA telescopes have no other plausible identification.

 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The phosphine discovered in Venus' clouds may be a big deal. Here's what you need to know. | Space

The phosphine discovered in Venus' clouds may be a big deal. Here's what you need to know. | Space | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

A chemical you've likely never heard of has burst into the news thanks to scientists' announcement that they have detected phosphine, which they say may be a sign of life, in the clouds of Venus.

Here's everything you need to know about phosphine, the strange chemical detected in the atmosphere of Venus.

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Artificial intelligence dives into thousands of WW2 photographs to identify photographers and objects

Artificial intelligence dives into thousands of WW2 photographs to identify photographers and objects | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

In a new international cross disciplinary study, researchers have used artificial intelligence to analyze large amounts of historical photos from WW2. Among other things, the study shows that artificial intelligence can recognize the identity of photographers based on the content of photos taken by them.

 

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is finally able to identify photographers based on the content of images they've taken. This is the conclusion of a new study at AU Engineering, Aarhus University, where, in collaboration with Tampere University and the Finnish Environment Institute, researchers have used state-of-the-art artificial intelligence to trawl through photographs taken by 23 well-known Finnish photographers during the Second World War.

 

 


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NASA’s OSIRIS-REX Spacecraft Completes Touch-Down on Bennu Asteroid

NASA’s OSIRIS-REX Spacecraft Completes Touch-Down on Bennu Asteroid | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

The spacecraft attempted to suck up rocks and dirt from the asteroid, which could aid humanity’s ability to divert one that might slam into Earth.

 

[How much of Bennu did NASA’s OSIRIS-REX collect? We’re waiting to find out.]

 

A NASA robot pogo-sticked off an asteroid on Tuesday and grabbed a sample of dirt and rocks, material that could give scientists new insights to the birth of the solar system.

From first impressions recorded 200 millions away on Earth, the OSIRIS-REX spacecraft pulled off its collection of bits of asteroid, a carbon-rich rock known as Bennu, perfectly. It then backed away and headed back to orbit.

 

“Transcendental,” Dante Lauretta, the principal investigator of the mission, said moments later. “I mean, I can’t believe we actually pulled this off.”

 

It will take a few more days before scientists can completely declare success. At present, they can only say that the spacecraft executed its instructions exactly as programmed. What is not yet known is how much material was actually grabbed. Scientists are hoping for at least a couple of ounces, but the sampling mechanism can hold up to four pounds. “It’s up to Bennu now to see how the event went,” Dr. Lauretta said. If it succeeded in its goal of sucking up some rocks and dirt from the asteroid’s surface, it could potentially unlock secrets to what the solar system was like when it first formed 4.5 billion years ago.

 

“The asteroids are like time capsules, floating in space, that can provide a fossil record of the birth of our solar system,” Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s planetary science division, said during a news conference on Monday. Many asteroids — including Bennu — cross the orbit of Earth and could collide with our planet someday. A better understanding of these space rocks, which come in many types, could aid humanity’s ability to divert one that might slam into Earth.

 

The name OSIRIS-REX is a shortening of Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Famous shadow of black hole provides novel test for new theories of gravity

Famous shadow of black hole provides novel test for new theories of gravity | Design, Comm, Sci and Tech | Scoop.it

Outwitting Albert Einstein just got even tougher. More than 100 years ago, the famous physicist published his explanation of gravity, known as general relativity (GR), which successfully explains everything from the orbits of planets to the bending of starlight. Still, some physicists have been trying to invent theories that can solve puzzles GR cannot—for example, by explaining away the need for invisible dark matter, whose gravity appears to bind the galaxies. But the first direct image of a black hole, revealed last year, has now provided a tough new test for theories of gravity. Fail it and your theory is dead. “It’s a new hoop to jump through and a fairly narrow one,” says Feryal Özel, an astrophysicist at the University of Arizona who helped devise the new test.

 

 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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