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5 ways to get your readers to actually finish your articles | #Press #Journalism #Publishers #Blogging

5 ways to get your readers to actually finish your articles | #Press #Journalism #Publishers #Blogging | Communication design | Scoop.it

The challenge of dwindling attention spans
There’s a well-recycled statistic out there that says the human attention span has dwindled from 12 seconds at the start of the century to less than 8 seconds today. And while some people argue the legitimacy of this data point, the reality is that attention spans certainly aren’t getting any better. The multisensory nature of the internet, social media, and other digital technologies is rewiring the human brain and making it harder for people to stay focused on singular tasks and objectives – both online and offline.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=press

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/02/26/curation-the-21st-century-way-to-learn-on-its-own-pace-and-to-organize-the-learning/

 

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 7, 2018 6:02 PM

The challenge of dwindling attention spans
There’s a well-recycled statistic out there that says the human attention span has dwindled from 12 seconds at the start of the century to less than 8 seconds today. And while some people argue the legitimacy of this data point, the reality is that attention spans certainly aren’t getting any better. The multisensory nature of the internet, social media, and other digital technologies is rewiring the human brain and making it harder for people to stay focused on singular tasks and objectives – both online and offline.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=press

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/02/26/curation-the-21st-century-way-to-learn-on-its-own-pace-and-to-organize-the-learning/

 

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from SocialMoMojo Comms & Content
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10 Creative Exercises That Are Better Than Brainstorming | HubSpot

10 Creative Exercises That Are Better Than Brainstorming | HubSpot | Communication design | Scoop.it
Sick of traditional brainstorming? Check out these alternative exercises to get the creativity flowing.

Via Jessica Kelly
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Jessica Kelly's curator insight, November 17, 2016 12:59 PM
There are some TERRIFIC ideas here for everyone that can work amazingly well for content/comms folks, for sure.
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15 examples of artificial intelligence in marketing

15 examples of artificial intelligence in marketing | Communication design | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence (see the Wikipedia definition), specifically machine learning, is an increasingly integral part of many industries, including marketing.

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, April 19, 2016 3:06 PM

Is there anything AI can't do?

 

Ben @Econsultancy shares 15 key examples of AI in Marketing:

 

1. Recommendations/content curation

2. Search engines3. Preventing fraud and data breaches4. Social semantics5. Website design6. Product pricing7. Predictive customer service8. Ad targeting9. Speech recognition10. Language recognition11. Customer Segmentation12. Sales forecasting13. Image recognition 14. Content generation15. Bots, PAs and messengers 
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49 Tactics to Atomize Your Content Marketing

49 Tactics to Atomize Your Content Marketing | Communication design | Scoop.it
Content atomization is taking a strong content marketing platform or theme, and executing it in many, strategically sound ways. Jay Baer shares 49 ways you can atomize your content right now.
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4 Creative Email Experiments You Should Try

4 Creative Email Experiments You Should Try | Communication design | Scoop.it

Email marketing has never had good press. That's because many newsletters look the same. 


Unfortunately, what works for one marketer may not for another person. You need to be creative.


As I always say, the most creative ideas are often the simplest. 


Rohan Ayyar has written a very good articles for HubSpot. Here are his suggestions, accompanied with case studies:


- Understand the user experience

- Reengage inactive subscribers

- Leverage coupons beyond sales

- Build reviews into your emails


Bookmark the post. You may find yourself coming back to it quite often. 


Read it at http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/email-marketing-experiments


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Cendrine Marrouat

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8 Metrics to Conquer a Content Marketer's Fear of Measurement

8 Metrics to Conquer a Content Marketer's Fear of Measurement | Communication design | Scoop.it

Measuring the success of a content strategy is not easy. There are so many factors and metrics to take into consideration!


If you feel overwhelmed by the task, Pawan Deshpande's article will be very useful. The way he breaks down the process is fantastic:


  • consumption
  • retention
  • sharing
  • engagement
  • leads
  • sales
  • production
  • costs


He also shares some very useful tips to lighten the load. I particularly like this quote:


"Start small. You don’t need to measure everything all at once. Rather than flying blind, start measuring something that’s easy for you and work from there."


Read the article at http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/2014/11/8-metrics-conquer-fear-measurement/


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Cendrine Marrouat

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5 Brands Shaking Up Visual Content Strategy with Hyperlapse

5 Brands Shaking Up Visual Content Strategy with Hyperlapse | Communication design | Scoop.it
Instagram allows brands to create professional looking timelapse videos - I highlight 5 brands shaking up their visual content strategy with Hyperlapse.
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Chris Anne Raymond's curator insight, November 4, 2014 9:42 AM

What ideas can you come up with to tell a story?

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The Powerful Impact of Social Sharing & Content Marketing [Infographic]

The Powerful Impact of Social Sharing & Content Marketing [Infographic] | Communication design | Scoop.it

How many marketers can pin down the impact of social media using hard numbers?

The following infographic, based largely on results from the Demand Gen Report 2013 B2B Content Preferences Survey and 2012 B2B Buyer Survey shows data to help answer that very important question.

Promoting content over social networks is now a vital part of getting a message in front of potential buyers, establishing thought leadership and making the most of content investments. That means understanding which social media channels are most appropriate for different campaigns, and it definitely means understanding how to optimize different types of content for your social campaigns.


Via Lauren Moss
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Spelling and grammar do matter, according to consumers

Spelling and grammar do matter, according to consumers | Communication design | Scoop.it
If you don’t think the public at large cares about your lack of editorial diligence, you’re wrong.
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Cindy Navarro's curator insight, August 26, 2013 5:46 PM

This matters to be a lot. Typos happen, but they should be rare when you are promoting your brand, product, or yourself.

Dani Hunter's curator insight, September 9, 2013 5:09 PM

An article like this could inspire a couple different grammar exercises in the classroom. The statistics (and the 'brid' picture) show the importance of proofreading and editing. Students could look for more pictures or come up with scenarios where they make up examples of grammatical errors in the media.

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The Digital Marketing Trio Of 2013 [Infographic]

The Digital Marketing Trio Of 2013 [Infographic] | Communication design | Scoop.it

Digital marketing has become one of the most focused on streams of marketing in the last few years. Three of the biggest digital marketing issues include social network marketing, mobile, SMS marketing, and content marketing. Here’s a brief look at each:

Social Network Marketing

As a marketing, you can rely on social media to connect, engage, and build relationships with current and potential customers.

Mobile / SMS Marketing

Mobile marketing is a term that covers several different methods of marketing through mobile devices. Mobile marketing can take several different shapes but one of the most popular is SMS marketing.

Content Marketing

Content marketing is the development of interesting and helpful materials to engage customers and clients. Examples of content can be blogs, infographics, online tools, YouTube videos etc.

 

This infographic displays some eye-opening statistics about these 3 digital marketing streams and might get you thinking more about including these streams into your marketing mix.


Via Lauren Moss
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Ennio Martignago's curator insight, August 29, 2013 3:01 AM

Sociale, Mobile e… Contenuti (!!!). Il terzetto di punta dell'anno in corso (e ml'olio solo di questo)

THOMAS Gwenaëlle's curator insight, August 29, 2013 3:12 AM

Le marketing digital on aime ça 

Ubleam's curator insight, August 29, 2013 3:47 AM

So do you use the smart logo : http://pinterest.com/ubleam/

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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How Your Prospect's Brains React To Stories

How Your Prospect's Brains React To Stories | Communication design | Scoop.it
Our brain passively takes in dry information. However, when we are hearing or listening to stories, It is full

Via janlgordon
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janlgordon's curator insight, December 8, 2016 8:45 PM

I selected this article from Curatti written by Scott Aughtmon because it explains the scientific process behind our brain response to compelling content.

 

Understand what drives people to respond to a story.

 

Study Reveals Engaging Content Wins Over Readers

 

The creative locations in the brain respond to certain types of storytelling. I agree that in order to attract an audience you need to understand what how they respond.

 

Aughtmon shows us how the mind if affected when presented with a catchy story.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

  • Stories activate larger areas in the brain – ones that "represent different aspects of meaning." Our mind isn't just listening, but it's also engaging.

 

  • The study shows that our brains are trying the comprehend what's happening in a story. It acts like a computer and starts to analyze the data.

 

  • Our minds will try to anticipate what is going to happen next. The brain actually sees what is being described visually.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Image: Courtesy of 123RF.

 

Read full article here: http://ow.ly/5oox306XfiI

 

Stay informed on trends, insights, what's happening in the digital world become a Curatti Insider today

janlgordon's comment, December 9, 2016 11:12 AM
Thank you @massimo facchinetti
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Google: Short Articles Won't Penalize Your Site; Think About Users

Google: Short Articles Won't Penalize Your Site; Think About Users | Communication design | Scoop.it


Google's John Mueller covered lots and lots of myths this past Friday in the Google Hangout on Google+. He said at the 34:37 minute mark that having short articles won't give you a Google penalty. He also said that even some long articles can be confusing fo
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The 14 Best Digital Tools to Improve Marketing Productivity - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice

The 14 Best Digital Tools to Improve Marketing Productivity - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice | Communication design | Scoop.it

Use these tools to help you market your business more efficiently using content marketing, SEO and Social media marketing 


Via Pantelis Chiotellis
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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Content Curation World
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Content Curation Takes Time

Content Curation Takes Time | Communication design | Scoop.it

Notwithstanding the viral content-marketing tam-tam keeps selling the idea of content curation as a miracle-shortcut to work less, produce more content and get all of the benefits that an online publisher would want to have, reality has quite a different shade.

To gain reader's attention trust and interest, it is evidently not enough to pull together a few interesting titles while adding a few lines of introductory text.


Unless your readers are not very interested themselves into the topic you cover, why would they take recomendations from someone who has not even had the time to fully go through his suggested resources?

Superficially picking apparently interesting content from titles or even automatically selecting content for others to read is like recommending movies or music records based on how much you like their trailers or their cover layouts.


Can that be useful beyond attracting some initial extra visibility?


How can one become a trusted information source if one does not thoroughly look and understand at what he is about to recommend?

This is why selling or even thinking the idea of using content curation as a time and money-saver is really non-sense.

Again, for some, this type of light content curation may work in attracting some extra visibility in the short-term, but it will be deleterious in the long one, as serious readers discover gradually that content being suggested has not even been read, let alone being summarized, highlighted or contextualized.

Content curation takes serious time.


A lot more than the one needed to create normal original content.

To curate content you need to:

  1. Find good content, resources and references. Even if you have good tools, the value is in searching where everyone else is not looking. That takes time.

  2. Read, verify and vet each potential resource, by taking the time needed to do this thoroughly.

  3. Make sense of what that resource communicates or represents / offers and be able to synthesize it for non-experts who will read about it.

  4. Synthesize and highlight the value of the chosen resource within the context of your interest area.

  5. Enrich the resource with relevant references, and related links for those that will want to find out more about it.

  6. Credit and attribute sources and contributors.

  7.  Preserve, classify and archive what you want to curate.

  8. Share, distribute, promote the curated work you have produced. Creating it is not enough.


(While it is certainly possible to do a good curation job without doing exactly all of the tasks I have outlined above, I believe that it is ideal to try to do as many as these as possible, as each adds more value to the end result you will create.)


These are many more steps and activities than the ones required to create an original piece of content.

Curation is all about quality, insight and attention to details.

It is not about quantity, speed, saving time, producing more with less.


Via Robin Good
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Filomena Gomes's curator insight, April 18, 2015 9:52 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Notwithstanding the viral content-marketing tam-tam keeps selling the idea of content curation as a miracle-shortcut to work less, produce more content and get all of the benefits that an online publisher would want to have, reality has quite a different shade.

To gain reader's attention trust and interest, it is evidently not enough to pull together a few interesting titles while adding a few lines of introductory text.

 

Unless your readers are not very interested themselves into the topic you cover, why would they take recomendations from someone who has not even had the time to fully go through his suggested resources?

Superficially picking apparently interesting content from titles or even automatically selecting content for others to read is like recommending movies or music records based on how much you like their trailers or their cover layouts.

 

Can that be useful beyond attracting some initial extra visibility?

 

How can one become a trusted information source if one does not thoroughly look and understand at what he is about to recommend?

This is why selling or even thinking the idea of using content curation as a time and money-saver is really non-sense.

Again, for some, this type of light content curation may work in attracting some extra visibility in the short-term, but it will be deleterious in the long one, as serious readers discover gradually that content being suggested has not even been read, let alone being summarized, highlighted or contextualized.

Content curation takes serious time.

 

A lot more than the one needed to create normal original content.

To curate content you need to:

Find good content, resources and references. Even if you have good tools, the value is in searching where everyone else is not looking. That takes time.

Read, verify and vet each potential resource, by taking the time needed to do this thoroughly.

Make sense of what that resource communicates or represents / offers and be able to synthesize it for non-experts who will read about it.

Synthesize and highlight the value of the chosen resource within the context of your interest area.

Enrich the resource with relevant references, and related links for those that will want to find out more about it.

Credit and attribute sources and contributors.

 Preserve, classify and archive what you want to curate.

Share, distribute, promote the curated work you have produced. Creating it is not enough.


(While it is certainly possible to do a good curation job without doing exactly all of the tasks I have outlined above, I believe that it is ideal to try to do as many as these as possible, as each adds more value to the end result you will create.)

 

These are many more steps and activities than the ones required to create an original piece of content.

Curation is all about quality, insight and attention to details.

It is not about quantity, speed, saving time, producing more with less.

 
Robert Kisalama's curator insight, April 18, 2015 11:37 AM

truly Curation should not be  merely aggregating different links without  taking off time to reflect indeed it is very to end up like some one buying clothes impulsively only to realise you could have done without some of them.

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 19, 2015 2:24 PM

 

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