Communication design
36.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Communication design
#ideas #design #inspiration #media #information
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

How the moon’s light affects animals

How the moon’s light affects animals | Communication design | Scoop.it
The moon’s light influences lion prey behavior, dung beetle navigation, fish growth, mass migrations and birdsong.

 

Crowds of people gather to watch an evening spectacle on beaches in Southern California: Twice a month, typically from March through August, the sand becomes carpeted with hundreds or thousands of California grunion. Writhing, flopping, silvery sardine look-alikes lunge as far onto shore as possible. As the female fish dig their tails into the sand and release eggs, males wrap around females and release sperm to fertilize those eggs. About 10 days later, the eggs hatch and the little grunion get washed out to sea.

 

This mating ritual is set to the tides, with hatching timed to the arrival of the peak high tide every two weeks. But the ultimate force choreographing this dance is the moon.

 

Many people know that the moon’s gravitational tug on the Earth drives the tides, and with them, the life cycles of coastal creatures. Yet the moon also influences life with its light.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Production and Storage of Stem Cells From Endangered Species

Production and Storage of Stem Cells From Endangered Species | Communication design | Scoop.it

Starting with normal skin cells, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have produced the first stem cells from endangered species. Such cells could eventually make it possible to improve reproduction and genetic diversity for some species, possibly saving them from extinction, or to bolster the health of endangered animals in captivity.

 

Video collection about stem cells:

http://tinyurl.com/7so5xyp


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from visual data
Scoop.it!

World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time

World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time | Communication design | Scoop.it

Temple University researchers recently put together the world's largest tree of life visualized across time. The family tree of living and extinct organisms encompasses 50,000 species—only a fraction of the world's history of life—and would easily take up hundreds of pages if laid out linearly. To fit their work onto a printed page, the researchers, led by evolutionary biologist S. Blair Hedges, instead decided to visualize the data as a spiral.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Newly discovered wasp turns social spiders into zombies

Newly discovered wasp turns social spiders into zombies | Communication design | Scoop.it

It sounds like the plot of the world's tiniest horror movie: deep in the Ecuadorian Amazon, a newly discovered species of wasp transforms a "social" spider into a zombie-like drone that abandons its colony to do the wasp's bidding. That's the gruesome, real-life discovery by University of British Columbia researchers, who detail the first example of a manipulative relationship between a new Zatypota species wasp and a social Anelosimus eximius spider in a study published recently in Ecological Entomology.

 

"Wasps manipulating the behaviour of spiders has been observed before, but not at a level as complex as this," said Philippe Fernandez-Fournier, lead author of the study and former master's student at UBC's department of zoology. "Not only is this wasp targeting a social species of spider but it's making it leave its colony, which it rarely does."

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Why Poison Frogs Don’t Poison Themselves

Why Poison Frogs Don’t Poison Themselves | Communication design | Scoop.it

The answer provide clues for developing better drugs to fight pain and addiction.

 

Don’t let their appearance fool you: Thimble-sized, dappled in cheerful colors and squishy, poison frogs in fact harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know. With a new paper published in the journal Science, scientists are a step closer to resolving a related head-scratcher — how do these frogs keep from poisoning themselves? And the answer has potential consequences for the fight against pain and addiction.

 

The new research, led by scientists at The University of Texas at Austin, answers this question for a subgroup of poison frogs that use the toxin epibatidine. To keep predators from eating them, the frogs use the toxin, which binds to receptors in an animal’s nervous system and can cause hypertension, seizures, and even death. The researchers discovered that a small genetic mutation in the frogs — a change in just three of the 2,500 amino acids that make up the receptor — prevents the toxin from acting on the frogs’ own receptors, making them resistant to its lethal effects. Not only that, but precisely the same change appeared independently three times in the evolution of these frogs.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.