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NASA Wants to Build a 'Starshade' to Hunt for Alien Planets

NASA Wants to Build a 'Starshade' to Hunt for Alien Planets | Communication design | Scoop.it

Starshade exoplanet-hunting missions may be technologically daunting, but not beyond NASA's reach. Such a mission would employ a space telescope and a separate craft flying about 25,000 miles (40,000 kilometers) ahead of it. This latter probe would be equipped with a large, flat, petaled shade designed to block starlight, potentially allowing the telescope to directly image orbiting alien worlds as small as Earth that would otherwise be lost in the glare. Instruments called coronagraphs, which have been installed on multiple ground-based and space telescopes, work on the same light-blocking principle. But coronagraphs are incorporated into the telescope itself.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The high-tech farming revolution

The high-tech farming revolution | Communication design | Scoop.it
Follow the Food – a new series by BBC Future and BBC World News – looks into where our food comes from and how will this change in the near future, thanks to new technologies and innovative ways of farming.

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
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Recent plant extinctions much more extensive than thought, study shows

Recent plant extinctions much more extensive than thought, study shows | Communication design | Scoop.it

A team of researchers with the Royal Botanic Gardens in the U.K. and Stockholm University has found that plant extinctions over the past two and a half centuries have been more extensive than previous estimates suggested. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their exhaustive study of plants and which have gone extinct, and what it might mean for future plant life.

 

In recent years, botanists have estimated that fewer than 150 plant species have gone extinct in modern times—most due to human activities. In this new effort, the researchers have found that the real number is closer to quadruple such estimates—they found 571 plants that have gone extinct since 1753. That was the year that famed botanist Carl Linnaeus published his Species Plantarum—a collection of all known plant species at that time.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Room Full Of Gas Masks With A Doll On A Chair In The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

Room Full Of Gas Masks With A Doll On A Chair In The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone | Communication design | Scoop.it

Thirty-three years have passed after the melt-down of reactor No. 4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant near Pripyat, Ukraine. It has resulted in the permanent evacuation of entire towns, killing thousands and creating a massive Exclusion Zone. The disaster is now back in the news thanks to HBO’s hit miniseries, “Chernobyl” and its accompanying podcast.

 

With a cumulative series viewership of 8 million and counting, the buzz has even caused controversy, spurring tourists to visit the overgrown corner of Ukraine, posing for selfies in front of the now-dormant shuttered nuclear plant, and at the ruins of Pripyat. There is debate as to whether the Exclusion Zone is becoming too commercialized.

 
 
 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The birth of the electronic beep

The birth of the electronic beep | Communication design | Scoop.it

The story behind the sound that rules our lives.

 

The electronic beep is everywhere. When you don’t fasten your seatbelt, your car beeps. When your microwave has finished reheating your leftover Chinese takeout, it beeps. The dishwasher beeps; the smoke detector beeps; when the coffee maker turns itself off automatically, it beeps. If you misplace your iPhone, you can make it beep, by remote control.

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'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report

'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report | Communication design | Scoop.it

A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report in the journal Astrobiology.

 

The bacterium that controls the formation of such rocks on Earth is ancient and thrives in harsh environments that are similar to conditions on Mars, said University of Illinois geology professor Bruce Fouke, who led the new, NASA-funded study.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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What is Elon Musk's Neuralink? Neural Lace Explained

Elon Musk’s new project Neuralink has been making headlines recently, but very little is known about this mysterious company so far. So, what is Neuralink?

 

Back in 2015, Professor Pedram Mohseni and Rudolph J. Nudo created a startup called ‘NeuraLink’. These pair of neurotech researchers had developed a device that could potentially help people suffering from brain injuries. Investors didn’t show a great deal of interest, but in 2016 a mysterious unknown investor came along with an offer to purchase the rights to the name, Neuralink, for tens of thousands of dollars. They sold, and that investor later turned out to be multi-billionaire, Elon Musk.

 


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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Technology in Business Today
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What's inside Tokyo's Robot Restaurant?

What's inside Tokyo's Robot Restaurant? | Communication design | Scoop.it
What's inside Tokyo’s Robot Restaurant?



Robots, Lasers, Dancers, Dragons - Japan's Robot Restaurant is unlike anything we've seen before!

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Spider-like senses could help autonomous machines see better

Spider-like senses could help autonomous machines see better | Communication design | Scoop.it

What if drones and self-driving cars had the tingling “spidey senses” of Spider-Man? They might actually detect and avoid objects better, says Andres Arrieta, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue University, because they would process sensory information faster.

 

Better sensing capabilities would make it possible for drones to navigate in dangerous environments and for cars to prevent accidents caused by human error. Current state-of-the-art sensor technology doesn’t process data fast enough – but nature does.

And researchers wouldn’t have to create a radioactive spider to give autonomous machines superhero sensing abilities.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Elephants Have Developed A Specific Alarm Call For 'Human!', Study Says

Elephants Have Developed A Specific Alarm Call For 'Human!', Study Says | Communication design | Scoop.it

Elephants are among the most intelligent animals in the world. Previous studies have found that elephants are able to recognize individual faces and that they have a unique and sophisticated set of social norms which even includes mourning. Recently scientists have discovered that elephants have their own form of rudimentary language which seems primarily designed to warn other members of their herd about potential threats.

 

Researchers from a collaborative team comprising scientists from Oxford University, Save the Elephants and Disney’s Animal Kingdom have been studying the noises elephants make when exposed to certain threats. The researchers found that if elephants are exposed to the sound of a human voice, specifically speaking in the language of the Samburu tribe of northern Kenya, that elephants become vigilant and emit a distinctive noise that sounds like a low rumble. Other elephants, not exposed to the human voice, reacted to the elephant alarm by running away and making the exact same rumbling noise.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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World’s Fastest Car – 1,000mph Bloodhound SSC – First Public Runs

A team of British scientists and engineers have created a full scale model for a car they intend to drive more than 1,000 mph. 

The model, named the Bloodhound SuperSonic Car (SSC), was built by a team of aerodynamic experts, who took three years to build it. Recently shown off to the world at the Farnborough International Air Show, the 42-foot-long Bloodhound resembles a bright blue missile with wheels. 



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Pluto Has a Buried Ocean — And So Might Many Other Worlds | Space

Pluto Has a Buried Ocean — And So Might Many Other Worlds | Space | Communication design | Scoop.it
Buried oceans like the one sloshing beneath the icy surface of the Jupiter moon Europa may be far more common across the cosmos than scientists had imagined.
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Big Water Survey

Big Water Survey | Communication design | Scoop.it

Help the Environment

 These designers are working for a cause and need your help.

Clean water, No plastic.  

 Can you help them? Answer the questions and share the link. 

7 questions in 30 seconds of your time, no sensitive data asked. 

https://water.stop.zone

 

*Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

Antonios Bouris's insight:

https://water.stop.zone

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D-Wave Introduces World’s Largest Quantum Computer

D-Wave Introduces World’s Largest Quantum Computer | Communication design | Scoop.it

The world's largest maker of quantum computers, Canada's D-Wave Systems Inc., recently announced the Pegasus generation of its quantum computers, featuring 2.5 times the qubits (more than 5,000) than its predecessor, as well as the elimination of a major stumbling block to commercialization by directly connecting each of those qubits to three times as many nearby qubits as its previous generation, the Chimera. Analysts are predicting that Pegasus will advance quantum applications down the technology lifetime exponential growth curve.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Russian scientist has threatened to make more CRISPR babies

A Russian scientist has threatened to make more CRISPR babies | Communication design | Scoop.it

A Russian biologist has told a journalist at Nature that he wants to create more gene-edited babies and will do it if he can win approval.

 

Who’s involved: Denis Rebrikov of the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University in Moscow says he wants to repeat last year’s widely condemned experiment in China to create humans resistant to HIV. He believes he can do a better job.

 

Is this serious? Rebrikov isn’t known for his work with gene editing. A search of his publications mostly turns up reports on biomarkers of gum disease. However, last October he did author a report in which the gene-editing tool CRISPR was applied to human IVF embryos, one of just a dozen or so such experiments ever described. What’s more, his coauthors included the director of a large Russian maternity clinic, the Kulakov National Medical Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Perinatology in Moscow. Rebikov believes Russian rules on creating gene-modified babies are unclear and says that he plans to seek approval to carry out the procedure.

 

Expert response: Experts say it wouldn’t be responsible to make more CRISPR babies at this time. One reason is that it is hard to know what unexpected effects altering a baby’s genes will have. The gene the Russians want to delete from embryos, CCR5, doesn’t just protect against HIV. It appears to have potential effects on cognition and life span, too. Yet some scientists will remain driven to genetically modify children, no matter what. “I think I’m crazy enough to do it,” Rebikov told Nature.


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How old are your organs? To scientists' surprise, organs are a mix of young and old cells

How old are your organs? To scientists' surprise, organs are a mix of young and old cells | Communication design | Scoop.it

Scientists once thought that neurons, or possibly heart cells, were the oldest cells in the body. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered that the mouse brain, liver and pancreas contain populations of cells and proteins with extremely long lifespans -- some as old as neurons. The findings, demonstrating "age mosaicism," were published in Cell Metabolismon June 6, 2019.

 

The team's methods could be applied to nearly any tissue in the body to provide valuable information about lifelong function of non-dividing cells and how cells lose control over the quality and integrity of proteins and important cell structures during aging.

"We were quite surprised to find cellular structures that are essentially as old as the organism they reside in," says Salk Vice President, Chief Science Officer Martin Hetzer, senior author and professor. "This suggests even greater cellular complexity than we previously imagined and has intriguing implications for how we think about the aging of organs, such as the brain, heart and pancreas."

 

Most neurons in the brain do not divide during adulthood and thus experience a long lifespan and age-related decline. Yet, largely due to technical limitations, the lifespan of cells outside of the brain was difficult to determine.

 

"Biologists have asked -- how old are cells in an organism? There is this general idea that neurons are old, while other cells in the body are relatively young and regenerate throughout the organism's lifetime," says Rafael Arrojo e Drigo, first author and Salk staff scientist. "We set out to see if it was possible that certain organs also have cells that were as long-lived as neurons in the brain."

 

Since the researchers knew that most neurons are not replaced during the lifespan, they used them as an "age baseline" to compare other non-dividing cells. The team combined electron isotope labeling with a hybrid imaging method (MIMS-EM) to visualize and quantify cell and protein age and turnover in the brain, pancreas and liver in young and old rodent models.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Space: The Final Illusion?

Space: The Final Illusion? | Communication design | Scoop.it

The intuitive idea that objects influence each other because they're in physical proximity is soon to become another of those beliefs that turn out to be wrong when we look deeper.

 

One persistent illusion is that physical objects only interact with other objects they are close to. This is called the principle of locality. We can express this more precisely by the law that the strengths of forces between any two objects falls off quickly—at least by some power of the distance between them. This can be explained by positing that the bodies do not interact directly, but only through the mediation of a field, such as an electromagnetic field, which propagates from one body to the other. Fields spread out as they propagate, with the field lines covering a constantly greater area—providing a natural explanation for the laws that say the forces between charges and masses fall off like the square of the distance between them.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Artist / Icon / Inspiration : Women in Photography

Artist / Icon / Inspiration : Women in Photography | Communication design | Scoop.it

Phillips announces the sale of Artist | Icon | Inspiration: Women in Photography, an auction presented with gallerist and collector Peter Fetterman that will explore the role of women as artists, subjects, and innovators. The auction on 7 June in New York will offer approximately…



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The Golden Age of Teaching Yourself Anything | #Autodidact

The Golden Age of Teaching Yourself Anything | #Autodidact | Communication design | Scoop.it

There are several components, but the real shocker is that more of us aren't embracing the current age of access to mastery of any topic. But that may not be so surprising—most of us were taught to be passive learners, to just "get through" school. It's easy to be lazy. The rewards of becoming an autodidact, though, include igniting inner fires, making new connections to knowledge and skills you already have, advancing in your career, meeting kindred spirits, and cultivating an overall zest for life and its riches.

 


Via Dennis T OConnor, Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 31, 3:06 AM

There are several components, but the real shocker is that more of us aren't embracing the current age of access to mastery of any topic. But that may not be so surprising—most of us were taught to be passive learners, to just "get through" school. It's easy to be lazy. The rewards of becoming an autodidact, though, include igniting inner fires, making new connections to knowledge and skills you already have, advancing in your career, meeting kindred spirits, and cultivating an overall zest for life and its riches.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

 https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2017/12/09/tips-to-become-an-autodidact-self-directed-learner/ 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/28/learning-to-learn-for-my-professional-development-i-did-it-my-way/

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=autodidact

 

Mrs Lord's curator insight, May 31, 4:59 PM
I've always felt 'different' because I genuinely love to learn, and most times it doesn't matter what...a combination of new experiences, new connections and new knowledge - maybe I just have a fondness for 'new'? 
Mayra Fonseca's curator insight, June 4, 2:41 PM
Do it yourself 
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Unfathomably deep oceans on alien water worlds? Hundreds or thousands of kilometers … Unfathomable. Bottomless. Very deep.

Unfathomably deep oceans on alien water worlds? Hundreds or thousands of kilometers … Unfathomable. Bottomless. Very deep. | Communication design | Scoop.it
Distant water exoplanets might have oceans thousands of miles deep. That's in contrast to Earth's ocean, which is about 6.8 miles (about 11 km) deep at its deepest point.

 

Water worlds – planets or moons with global oceans – used to be considered part of science fiction, but we are starting to learn now that, not only do they exist, they might actually be fairly common.

 

In our own solar system, the moons Europa, Enceladus, Titan and Ganymede are known or suspected to have such oceans beneath their outer ice crust. Even Pluto is now thought to have one!


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Day Meets Night in This Amazing Astronaut Photo of Earth from Space | Space

Day Meets Night in This Amazing Astronaut Photo of Earth from Space | Space | Communication design | Scoop.it
NASA astronaut Christina Koch shared a stunning image of planet Earth captured from the International Space Station.
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Using AI and Space Tech to detect Bowel Cancer

Using AI and Space Tech to detect Bowel Cancer | Communication design | Scoop.it
Using AI and Space Tech to detect Bowel Cancer







Scientists in London are using artificial intelligence to help detect bowel cancer in its early stages, by identifying cancerous growths from a live video feed of a colonoscopy. Gracie Jerome reports.

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