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Space: The Final Illusion?

Space: The Final Illusion? | Communication design | Scoop.it

The intuitive idea that objects influence each other because they're in physical proximity is soon to become another of those beliefs that turn out to be wrong when we look deeper.

 

One persistent illusion is that physical objects only interact with other objects they are close to. This is called the principle of locality. We can express this more precisely by the law that the strengths of forces between any two objects falls off quickly—at least by some power of the distance between them. This can be explained by positing that the bodies do not interact directly, but only through the mediation of a field, such as an electromagnetic field, which propagates from one body to the other. Fields spread out as they propagate, with the field lines covering a constantly greater area—providing a natural explanation for the laws that say the forces between charges and masses fall off like the square of the distance between them.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Artist / Icon / Inspiration : Women in Photography

Artist / Icon / Inspiration : Women in Photography | Communication design | Scoop.it

Phillips announces the sale of Artist | Icon | Inspiration: Women in Photography, an auction presented with gallerist and collector Peter Fetterman that will explore the role of women as artists, subjects, and innovators. The auction on 7 June in New York will offer approximately…



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The Golden Age of Teaching Yourself Anything | #Autodidact

The Golden Age of Teaching Yourself Anything | #Autodidact | Communication design | Scoop.it

There are several components, but the real shocker is that more of us aren't embracing the current age of access to mastery of any topic. But that may not be so surprising—most of us were taught to be passive learners, to just "get through" school. It's easy to be lazy. The rewards of becoming an autodidact, though, include igniting inner fires, making new connections to knowledge and skills you already have, advancing in your career, meeting kindred spirits, and cultivating an overall zest for life and its riches.

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 31, 6:06 AM

There are several components, but the real shocker is that more of us aren't embracing the current age of access to mastery of any topic. But that may not be so surprising—most of us were taught to be passive learners, to just "get through" school. It's easy to be lazy. The rewards of becoming an autodidact, though, include igniting inner fires, making new connections to knowledge and skills you already have, advancing in your career, meeting kindred spirits, and cultivating an overall zest for life and its riches.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

 https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2017/12/09/tips-to-become-an-autodidact-self-directed-learner/ 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/28/learning-to-learn-for-my-professional-development-i-did-it-my-way/

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=autodidact

 

Mrs Lord's curator insight, May 31, 7:59 PM
I've always felt 'different' because I genuinely love to learn, and most times it doesn't matter what...a combination of new experiences, new connections and new knowledge - maybe I just have a fondness for 'new'? 
Mayra Fonseca's curator insight, June 4, 5:41 PM
Do it yourself 
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Unfathomably deep oceans on alien water worlds? Hundreds or thousands of kilometers … Unfathomable. Bottomless. Very deep.

Unfathomably deep oceans on alien water worlds? Hundreds or thousands of kilometers … Unfathomable. Bottomless. Very deep. | Communication design | Scoop.it
Distant water exoplanets might have oceans thousands of miles deep. That's in contrast to Earth's ocean, which is about 6.8 miles (about 11 km) deep at its deepest point.

 

Water worlds – planets or moons with global oceans – used to be considered part of science fiction, but we are starting to learn now that, not only do they exist, they might actually be fairly common.

 

In our own solar system, the moons Europa, Enceladus, Titan and Ganymede are known or suspected to have such oceans beneath their outer ice crust. Even Pluto is now thought to have one!


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Day Meets Night in This Amazing Astronaut Photo of Earth from Space | Space

Day Meets Night in This Amazing Astronaut Photo of Earth from Space | Space | Communication design | Scoop.it
NASA astronaut Christina Koch shared a stunning image of planet Earth captured from the International Space Station.
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Using AI and Space Tech to detect Bowel Cancer

Using AI and Space Tech to detect Bowel Cancer | Communication design | Scoop.it
Using AI and Space Tech to detect Bowel Cancer







Scientists in London are using artificial intelligence to help detect bowel cancer in its early stages, by identifying cancerous growths from a live video feed of a colonoscopy. Gracie Jerome reports.

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Machine learning overtakes humans when it comes to predicting death or heart attack

Machine learning overtakes humans when it comes to predicting death or heart attack | Communication design | Scoop.it

Machine learning advances go above and beyond what has presently been achieved in medicine, the findings showed. Machine learning is overtaking humans in predicting death and heart attack, suggesting a continued maturation of the technology and a potential for increased efficiency among caregivers in the healthcare system, finds a study presented at the International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac.

 


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Next-Gen Megascope for Astronomy Taking Shape on Chilean Mountaintop | Space

Next-Gen Megascope for Astronomy Taking Shape on Chilean Mountaintop | Space | Communication design | Scoop.it
The Giant Magellan Telescope has notched some important milestones on its path to 'first light' in the mid-2020s.
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Our Galaxy - the Milky Way

Our Galaxy - the Milky Way | Communication design | Scoop.it

To the naked eye, our Galaxy appears as the Milky Way: an irregular, unevenly luminous band of dim light. Invisible from urban habitats and barely visible from many suburban locations, the Milky Way is actually bright enough, when located at the zenith of a dark sky site on a moonless night, to cast shadows on the ground. It will be useful to summarize briefly how our understanding has progressed from this naked eye view to the Galaxy model of modern astronomy.


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Could There Be Life on Mars Today? | Space

Could There Be Life on Mars Today? | Space | Communication design | Scoop.it
The search for life on Mars shouldn't focus exclusively on the distant past, some researchers say.

 

Four billion years ago, the Martian surface was apparently quite habitable, featuring rivers, lakes and even a deep ocean. Indeed, some astrobiologists view ancient Mars as an even better cradle for life than Earth was, and they suspect that life on our planet may have come here long ago aboard Mars rocks blasted into space by a powerful impact.

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Climate change: Scientists test radical ways to fix Earth's climate

Climate change: Scientists test radical ways to fix Earth's climate | Communication design | Scoop.it

Scientists in Cambridge plan to set up a research centre to develop new ways to repair the Earth's climate. It will investigate radical approaches such as refreezing the Earth's poles and removing CO2 from the atmosphere. The center is being created because of fears that current approaches will not on their own stop dangerous and irreversible damage to the planet.


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That Weird, Aurora-Like Phenomenon Called STEVE Finally Has an Explanation | Space

That Weird, Aurora-Like Phenomenon Called STEVE Finally Has an Explanation | Space | Communication design | Scoop.it
STEVE looks like an aurora, but isn't quite one. Scientists think they've finally sorted out how electrons cause the strange phenomenon.
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Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows

Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows | Communication design | Scoop.it

Research has shown that people who are born blind or become blind early in life often have a more nuanced sense of hearing, especially when it comes to musical abilities and tracking moving objects in space (imagine crossing a busy road using sound alone). For decades scientists have wondered what changes in the brain might underlie these enhanced auditory abilities.

 

 


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The birth of the electronic beep

The birth of the electronic beep | Communication design | Scoop.it

The story behind the sound that rules our lives.

 

The electronic beep is everywhere. When you don’t fasten your seatbelt, your car beeps. When your microwave has finished reheating your leftover Chinese takeout, it beeps. The dishwasher beeps; the smoke detector beeps; when the coffee maker turns itself off automatically, it beeps. If you misplace your iPhone, you can make it beep, by remote control.

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'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report

'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report | Communication design | Scoop.it

A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report in the journal Astrobiology.

 

The bacterium that controls the formation of such rocks on Earth is ancient and thrives in harsh environments that are similar to conditions on Mars, said University of Illinois geology professor Bruce Fouke, who led the new, NASA-funded study.

 

 


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What is Elon Musk's Neuralink? Neural Lace Explained

Elon Musk’s new project Neuralink has been making headlines recently, but very little is known about this mysterious company so far. So, what is Neuralink?

 

Back in 2015, Professor Pedram Mohseni and Rudolph J. Nudo created a startup called ‘NeuraLink’. These pair of neurotech researchers had developed a device that could potentially help people suffering from brain injuries. Investors didn’t show a great deal of interest, but in 2016 a mysterious unknown investor came along with an offer to purchase the rights to the name, Neuralink, for tens of thousands of dollars. They sold, and that investor later turned out to be multi-billionaire, Elon Musk.

 


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What's inside Tokyo's Robot Restaurant?

What's inside Tokyo's Robot Restaurant? | Communication design | Scoop.it
What's inside Tokyo’s Robot Restaurant?



Robots, Lasers, Dancers, Dragons - Japan's Robot Restaurant is unlike anything we've seen before!

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Spider-like senses could help autonomous machines see better

Spider-like senses could help autonomous machines see better | Communication design | Scoop.it

What if drones and self-driving cars had the tingling “spidey senses” of Spider-Man? They might actually detect and avoid objects better, says Andres Arrieta, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue University, because they would process sensory information faster.

 

Better sensing capabilities would make it possible for drones to navigate in dangerous environments and for cars to prevent accidents caused by human error. Current state-of-the-art sensor technology doesn’t process data fast enough – but nature does.

And researchers wouldn’t have to create a radioactive spider to give autonomous machines superhero sensing abilities.

 


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Elephants Have Developed A Specific Alarm Call For 'Human!', Study Says

Elephants Have Developed A Specific Alarm Call For 'Human!', Study Says | Communication design | Scoop.it

Elephants are among the most intelligent animals in the world. Previous studies have found that elephants are able to recognize individual faces and that they have a unique and sophisticated set of social norms which even includes mourning. Recently scientists have discovered that elephants have their own form of rudimentary language which seems primarily designed to warn other members of their herd about potential threats.

 

Researchers from a collaborative team comprising scientists from Oxford University, Save the Elephants and Disney’s Animal Kingdom have been studying the noises elephants make when exposed to certain threats. The researchers found that if elephants are exposed to the sound of a human voice, specifically speaking in the language of the Samburu tribe of northern Kenya, that elephants become vigilant and emit a distinctive noise that sounds like a low rumble. Other elephants, not exposed to the human voice, reacted to the elephant alarm by running away and making the exact same rumbling noise.


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World’s Fastest Car – 1,000mph Bloodhound SSC – First Public Runs

A team of British scientists and engineers have created a full scale model for a car they intend to drive more than 1,000 mph. 

The model, named the Bloodhound SuperSonic Car (SSC), was built by a team of aerodynamic experts, who took three years to build it. Recently shown off to the world at the Farnborough International Air Show, the 42-foot-long Bloodhound resembles a bright blue missile with wheels. 



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Pluto Has a Buried Ocean — And So Might Many Other Worlds | Space

Pluto Has a Buried Ocean — And So Might Many Other Worlds | Space | Communication design | Scoop.it
Buried oceans like the one sloshing beneath the icy surface of the Jupiter moon Europa may be far more common across the cosmos than scientists had imagined.
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Big Water Survey

Big Water Survey | Communication design | Scoop.it

Help the Environment

 These designers are working for a cause and need your help.

Clean water, No plastic.  

 Can you help them? Answer the questions and share the link. 

7 questions in 30 seconds of your time, no sensitive data asked. 

https://water.stop.zone

 

*Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

Antonios Bouris's insight:

https://water.stop.zone

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Searching for the world's last remaining sawfish

Searching for the world's last remaining sawfish | Communication design | Scoop.it
Florida is one of a few remaining strongholds for the smalltooth sawfish in the world, pictured here in Everglades National Park. A second species, the largetooth sawfish used to populate America’s coastline, but hasn’t been seen since 1961. All five species of sawfish are endangered.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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