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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.

Martin Kemp's insight:

how do these people not know what the crop they are producing is or tastes like? that is amazing to me how you can be so oblivious to what you are doing. and how the place that produces cocoa does not actually have access to it.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 6:02 PM

this is an interesting demonstration of the disconnect between the consumer and the producer. we would consider chocolate to be the product these guys are producing, yet we forget that they only deal with it at the rawest level. something we see everyday is something as rare as gold to these guys.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory Coast, Africa, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 4:30 PM
Chocolate is linked to modern day slavery in Africa. The cocoa bean is a billion dollar industry where westerners have the luxury of enjoying while the Ivory coast farmers have the sad fate of cultivating. Most farmers on the Ivory coast do not even know what the cocoa bean is made out of or what chocolate tastes like. Chocolate is a luxury on the Ivory coast because it is hardly available and very expensive. They simply are trying to make a living off of a highly consumed, taken for granted item in wealthy countries. We only see the pleasure behind the cocoa bean not the horrors it actually comes with.
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A Tit for Tat: A Spratly Island Spat!

If you haven't yet discovered http://www.plaidavenger.com/ I recommend exploring it (numerous World Regional resources). You'll find its brand of geography has a whole lot of personality; you'll decide soon enough whether that personality works for your classroom.  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on political geography, the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ), and the strategic importance of overseas exclaves using the Spratly Island example in the South China Sea.

Minor correction to video: Territorial waters only extend 12 miles offshore, not the 200 miles of the exclusive economic zone. 

Martin Kemp's insight:

what i would like to know about in relation to this would be what the people of these islands see themselves as. also i think that one of the reasons these countries especially china wants these islands is because it would expand their territory in the ocean (200 miles off the coast) that they would now own.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:30 PM

This is definitely an interesting tool to use in the classroom. But it also gives the viewer an animated expression of geographic topics. The EEZ that make countries fight over small useless islands because it allows for access to profitable seas. I like this goofy host and the way he takes on serious topics in a way that makes them engaging for people who would otherwise be bored when just reading about it in a text book.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 8:08 PM

I truly believe that if a World War III erupts, it will solely be the fault of China. China isn't contempt with the current land it possesses. As one of the world's super power, China is trying to expand its territory to become a holder of the global economy. Not solely on China, but countries that lie on the South China Sea are claiming the scattered island that lies in the middle of the sea. But the problem comes with the definition of how much land outside of a country can a country possess? If China were to possess this land, what would happen to all of the natives?

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 25, 2018 8:04 PM
(Southeast Asia) The Spratly Islands in the South China Sea are a hotbed of tension as China militarizes its navy to spread further into southeast Asian waters. It all has to do with Exclusive Economic Zones, which gives a country exclusive access to the waters around its land. The islands are simultaneously claimed by China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Although China is not particularly close to the islands, it patrols the area with battleships and interrupts ships from neighboring countries. Besides the miles of ocean radius the island provides, it may hold oil and is a spot for a potential navy base. The dispute is a major regional issue and could lead any of the countries into a lopsided war against China.
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Video: Fighting Poverty with Ingenuity

I absolutely love creative, out-of-the-box, innovative people! People who use their creativity to make a difference in the World.... Incredible! "We want to ...

 

Martin Kemp's insight:

people making the best of their situation and being inovative and creative is insperational and the rest of the world should follow suit

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Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:18 PM

This is such a fantastic idea. Once again, in an area that is forced to adapt people will. Here  the “Solar Demi” was able to work within his environment to come up with an alternate way to light homes. It is great that he is doing this given how it affects the areas health and productivity.

Some people in the United States may think this contraption beneath them though. However, I also think that in some ways this is a better form of energy for places that have the access to solar light. I know that most electric lighting in our country uses some form of fossil fuel, which impacts the environment in an adverse manner when used too much. Since the ozone layer is already doing poorly, areas that are trying to develop would just as more harm to the equation. So I love this, not just for the creativity but also because it seems to be more economically friendly.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 30, 2015 2:50 PM

This video shows ingenuity of a persons mind and plastic bottles. This is a use of something that seems to useless but plays a very large roll in daily life of the people. This plastic bottle filled with water and placed in thecut out of tin roofs created natural sunlight for the the people in the poorest communities. This cut power bills and it also created a safer living situation for the people. It shows the use for something so useless in our area of the community but so usefull to other areas of the world.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:12 PM

this is a great invention, however the use of these light bottles would be restricted to environments where water never freezes. however, in regions which are economically in trouble where it is generally warm, it can be a cheap source of light in a normally dark building.

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Boxing in the Shadow of Pacquiao

Boxing in the Shadow of Pacquiao | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Young men in the Philippines, inspired by the light welterweight champion Manny Pacquiao, are training to escape poverty, boxing for a few dollars more than they make as subsistence farmers.

 


Via Seth Dixon
Martin Kemp's insight:

i think this a great for a whole country of young men can have a great roll model like manny to model themselves after, what is best about this is that he got great doing somthing that is still important to their culture. he also never forgot where he came from and still have great influence in culture and politics of his home.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:01 PM

For those who live in poverty access to skills that allow for upward mobility and prosperity are limited. So even though the odds of becoming a world class boxer are slim, it seems more attractive than being a poor farmer for the rest of your life. In poor areas like the Philippines young people hope to become more wealthy and the opportunity to do is so small that they will train for that one in a million chance of making it as a professional boxer.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 5:41 PM

Inspirational video, as i see a group of young men who inspire to be one of the greatest fighters to come out of the Philippines. Its a very good story and for them to have this dream to make it out with boxing its very aspiring to anyone who has a dream to become a doctor,  scientists, basketball player or anything. Its all about hope and this young men have that. Escaping poverty is difficult and very tough and one day we hope to see many more good fighters from all across the globe to represent their countries just like Manny Pacquiao did.

Matt Chapman's curator insight, April 26, 2018 12:41 PM
Manny Pacquiao has inspired many Phillipian young men who now see boxing as a way to escape poverty and the troubles of being in the Phillipines.  This is good for the country because is adds a global scale to the Phillipines.  Manny Pacquiao has shined a light on the Phillipines and is now working to improve it 
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Which country has the biggest economy?

An animated infographic showing the top three economies throughout history. Does China have the world's largest economy? Is China's economy bigger than America's?

 

Tags: economic, China, development, India.

Martin Kemp's insight:

i would never have thought that china and india would have dominated would economy throughout the past, now it is not that much of a suprise, but especially during the times where france britain and italy (romans) dominated the world, how is it possible that india and china were so far ahead of them economically?

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:31 PM

I think this was honestly super cool. It was interesting to see the massive size of the economies of China and India throughout history, especially coming from a background of eurocentric approaches to history in our education system. It's interesting to grow up hearing about the formidable size and power of the Roman Empire, only to discover that its power was dwarfed by two other empires, who have dominated their part of the globe for much of human history. It was stunning to see just how much the industrial revolution changed the geopolitical landscape; we learn about it and its affects in school, but I feel like the fact that it very much was a "revolution" is lost on kids. The world was completely altered by the advent of mass production, as evidenced by the swing of economic power from East to West following the revolution. It was also impressive to see just how large the American economy was in the 1950's. However, the tides have begun to turn, as we are quickly seeing the ascent of the Chinese economy once again, with India slowly getting back on track as well. With a population of over 1 billion people, India is the world's largest democracy, and has the potential to be a superpower on a scale that the world has never seen before.

Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 2018 12:45 PM
China has historically been one of the world's largest economies. The fact that the US has claimed that position for the last century is more of an anomaly than some may expect. China has always been an integral player in global trade, from the silk road to the spice trade, so their reemergence to be one of the world's largest economies is more of a return to normalcy than an unforeseen circumstance. 
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Why China's ethnic minorities are being left out of the economic boom

Facing ethnic discrimination, China's Uighurs and Tibetans have fallen behind as the rest of the country surges ahead
Martin Kemp's insight:

this is kind of a weird situation. places like tibet have the opportunity to move to places in china with great economic opportunites, but since they are treated as different and since they have pride as tibetans and want to stay in their land, they end up staying and remaining a primarily farming country and being left out of the chinese economic boom.

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Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, June 3, 2015 2:15 PM

What does this mean for these minorities....will they be phased out of existence?  What cultural impact is there?

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 19, 2015 12:59 PM

"Can't we all just get along?" Ethnic discrimination exists in every industrialized society in every part of the globe, the result of poverty, ignorance, hatred, and various peoples now confined to national borders that do not suit their needs. Chinese discrimination against ethnic Tibetans has long been documented and observed within the West, meeting the condemnation of much of the Western world, so it was interesting to learn about the Uighurs and their plight in Chinese society- I was unaware that China had any significant Muslim populations. To learn that Chinese government officials attempted to evict and ethnic Uighur from her apartment simply for being of her ethnicity is appalling, and something that one can only hope will stop in the future. Is America in a position to judge others for how they treat their ethnic minorities? Not at all- just look at the demographics of our prison system and our families who fall below the poverty line, or our treatment of Native Americans only 100 years ago. Such racism has long been a facet of human civilization, and it is up to us to make it a thing of our past and not of our future. Can we all get along? I hope so.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:02 AM

This video is a clear example of how the Uighurs and the Tibetans have been left out of the economic boom of China. China is known for being perhaps the biggest economic power in the world, the main concern is that how is it that not everyone is benefitting from the situation? These Uighurs and Tibetan minorities are suffering from the power China has. This video shows that the rural areas in the country are suffering. Some people have moved to the city but some people have stood by to there rural roots. The minorities reject the city because they get discriminized for who they are. They don't know the language, and usually would be provided with lower wage jobs. These people prefer to stay in there rural areas but it is still important to help these people but providing a better education. 

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Diwali: Festival of Lights

Diwali: Festival of Lights | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
In India, one of the most significant festivals is Diwali, or the Festival of Lights. It's a five-day celebration that includes good food, fireworks, colored sand, and special candles and lamps.
Martin Kemp's insight:

this is a great example of cultural diffusion. you can see events like this all over the U.S including here in providence with the waterfires, very cool.

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Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:40 AM

In India, one of the most significant festivals in the region is in Diwali, known as the Festival of Lights. The festival symbolizes the forces of lights over the force of darkness. In other words, it symbolizes the good of the country over the evil. This is a festival around the Christmas time which allows families and friends to join together in order to represent the good. The day is followed by rituals, going to the temple, food, etc. and of course the lights. It is truly fascinating how thousands of people reunite in order to make this festival happen over and over each year. It is a day for sure that describes peace against the problems occurring in the country and it is a ray of hope for others. Some critics, are concerned about the thousands of fireworks that are lit up because they say it causes too much pollution but it is  day to rejoice and forget the bad to others.

David Stiger's curator insight, November 12, 2018 3:48 PM
Learning about the cultural practices of other societies and civilizations has a way of humanizing unknown people. Of course Westerners can intellectually understand the people in South Asia are human beings, but seeing the images and features of Diwali - especially the parallels with Christianity - makes India seem less foreign and more relatable. Indians celebrating Diwali can also probably relate to the mixed feelings of a shamelessly commercialized holiday. The commercialization in America is borderline manipulative as it pressures people to worry about gifts, money, and shopping.  Christmas shopping in the Western world suffocates the holy nature of the birth of Christ - making the whole season overly materialistic, stressful, and self-indulgent. It distorts the human ego creating its own form of darkness. India's festival of lights may be encountering a similar form of dark commercialization where values such as family and goodwill are set aside for spending and material desires. Hopefully, for both Christmas and Diwali, light can be restored by studying and reflecting on our materialist ways and reverting back to the old ways. 
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 8:57 PM
This National Geographic video is a beautiful introduction to the cultural practices of the people of India and of Diwali. Diwali is a fall festival symbolizing the triumph of light over darkness. It is a 5 day celebration that includes food, fireworks colored vibrant clothing and sands, and special candles and lamps.
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India-Pakistan border Ceremony

Fascinating footage of a traditional ceremony that takes place on the Pakistan India border. From the BBC
Martin Kemp's insight:

whether or not this incites nationalism in a poor way, i think it is a good thing. no nationalism is a very detrimental thing to a country, i believe that this does benefit both countries in a way, maybe not as far as relations between the two countries but internally having love for your own country.

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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 2018 5:51 PM
This video shows a ceremony that takes place on the India-Pakistan border and how precisely things need to be done to keep the peace. The two flags are lowered at a slow pace to ensure they are being lowered at the same pace, for if one were to be lowered before the other it could cause an international dispute. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 2018 8:20 PM
This is a really interesting display of hyper-nationalism and masculinity that has been taking place at the India-Pakistan border for years. On the surface, it seems like simply an entertaining, friendly competition. However, many are concerned that this tradition does nothing but enforce the tension between the two countries.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 3:24 PM
This event is interesting. Its almost reminds of me of two football teams staring each other down and chanting before a football game.  There is alot of tension between the two countries and some thing there is always a lingering possibility of war. This can seem to some as a way to be macho and "battle" without actually going to war. 
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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

"The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water."

Martin Kemp's insight:

there is a constantly recurring theme here, mass population growth and the government of said country not being able to grow at the same rate to provide simple services to its people

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:18 PM

With the lack of toilets and the uprising in the use of cell phones in India, the sanitation and living standards of the people of the country are lacking which in turn comes to a place of hazard. With more people moving into the country and from other areas it is causing a massive uprise in the use of technology but government funding and jobs do not create enough money to continuously keep up with the upgrades needed in sanitation and public safety.

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 8:48 PM
In the last few decades the population in India grew to 181 million, but now, the population is more that 1.2 billion people and is on track to overtake China. India's rapid economic growth also reflects in census too. Almost all households in India have cellphones but fewer households don't even have toilets!
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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.

Martin Kemp's insight:

how do these people not know what the crop they are producing is or tastes like? that is amazing to me how you can be so oblivious to what you are doing. and how the place that produces cocoa does not actually have access to it.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 6:02 PM

this is an interesting demonstration of the disconnect between the consumer and the producer. we would consider chocolate to be the product these guys are producing, yet we forget that they only deal with it at the rawest level. something we see everyday is something as rare as gold to these guys.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory Coast, Africa, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 4:30 PM
Chocolate is linked to modern day slavery in Africa. The cocoa bean is a billion dollar industry where westerners have the luxury of enjoying while the Ivory coast farmers have the sad fate of cultivating. Most farmers on the Ivory coast do not even know what the cocoa bean is made out of or what chocolate tastes like. Chocolate is a luxury on the Ivory coast because it is hardly available and very expensive. They simply are trying to make a living off of a highly consumed, taken for granted item in wealthy countries. We only see the pleasure behind the cocoa bean not the horrors it actually comes with.
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The Spread of AIDS

The Spread of AIDS | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
A handful of AIDS cases were first recognized in the U.S. at the beginning of the 1980s. By 1990, there was a pandemic. In 1997, more than 3 million people became newly infected with HIV.
Martin Kemp's insight:

you always hear about the aids problem in africa but this graph really puts it into context and you can see how huge of a problem this is. obviously better doctors/education is needed in these places to halt this pandemic

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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:36 PM

Lack of education, social stigma, and poverty all play into the role of the spread of HIV in the sub sahara African region. This is a stoppable disease, but only with understanding of how it is passed, and education on how to stop the spread. Condoms, monogamy, good hygiene around bodily fluids and education on intravenous drug use are the only ways to slow the progress of AIDS.

 

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 8:32 PM
This article gives us the information about HIV over the past few decades. At first, there were only a few cases in the U.S in 1980. By 1990, the world had its first pandemic. 1997 more than 3 million people had become infected with HIV. A treatment was proved effected in the mid 1990s and changed HIV from death to chronic illness. Most of the regions that were hit hardest were the ones with little or no health care infrastructure such as Africa, but many nations have stepped up in prevention towards HIV. 
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A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march
Martin Kemp's insight:

once again a recurring theme, greedy and corrupt people running countries. with such immense mineral deposits how can this country not be prospering. because the people of these countries are selfish and once again not nationalistic to the point where people will try to make a significant change.

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Brian von Kraus's curator insight, January 12, 2016 6:15 PM

Amazing videographic from The Economist showing the recent history of Congo that explains the current instability of the country. 

Matt Danielson's curator insight, November 19, 2018 1:55 PM
his is a great short yet informative breakdown of recent conflict in the Congo. this mineral wealth has lead to much conflict over groups attempting to gain control over it ranging from local militias, the government troops, and outside conflicts spilling in (Rwanda rebels for example). These conflicts have had a severe negative effect on the countries population ranging from political issues, to economic lack of growth because even though minerals are being sold, the wealth gained is not spread to better the country, but to retain control on the mines and for making themselves rich.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 4:06 PM
The natural resources located in Congo have caused a lot of government instability. There are many competing groups of violent people in the small country of Congo. The country of Congo has been through a lot militia struggle and people trying to seize power of the country, not always for the resources but in some cases for ratification of minority group that the majority group does not like. Congo is at the bottom of the spectrum of health and wealth as well.
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AfriGadget: Recycling

A Cameroonian boy shows the recycled parts used to construct a toy RC car.

 

I originally found this video on Afrigadget. The website seeks to show people "solving everyday problems with African ingenuity." While the developed world lives in a commercial, disposable society, Africans often need to maximize the useablity of all objects. The solutions they come up with can show students that it is not all doom and gloom in Africa, an represent a triumph of the human spirit.

Martin Kemp's insight:

see this is how the world should be, making the best out of a situation and not just complaining about how you dont have toys, make a toy and enjoy it. also, i probably would not have been able to make that.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:38 PM

This video shows that while we assume poor underprivileged nations are simply stagnate and their citizens simply spend their time consumed with their suffering is wrong. While these children don't have access to toys or quality materials they still show great creativity and ingenuity by creating their own toy using what ever materials they have at hand. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 4:00 PM

Africa has an advantage as being one of the youngest continent in the world. With child innovative projects such as this, in the near future, these kids will be able to compete with the rest of the world on a global spectrum. They are not bound by their circumstances but are finding new ways to create a better future for themselves

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:42 PM

Rescooped from Professor Dixon. Human's really are incredible. This is a pretty cool excerpt on a homemade tool in Africa. It also points out the extreme poverty they live their day to day lives with.

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Understanding the Darfur Conflict

This is a short, but effective video to quickly explain the geographic factors that have led to such turmoil within the Darfur region.  For more in-depth resources, see:

http://www.scoop.it/t/darfur-devastation

 


Via Clovis C. Perry, Jr., Cassandra Medeiros
Martin Kemp's insight:

why does it seem that every conflict in the world is started and sustained by Arabs, i dont know if that sounds bad or not but all over the world arabs seem to be running around killing people. also how does the government of sudan/darfur allow this to happen. greedy people running these countries is the problem.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:45 AM

(Africa topic 5)

Darfur serves as an example of why the Sahel region is so prone to conflict. Though certain regions can be thought of as a melting pot of cultures and ethnicities, the northern and southern peoples are both struggling to for sustainability in a climatologically unstable region undergoing desertification, which raises tensions over land use. With the transition zone slowly trending southward, those from the north claim they need access to resources such as water, whereas those in the south claim it to be their own land.

Through this conflict the issue of racism has been raised, forming 'walls' between central Africans and northern Arabs. This will only distract and distort from the main issue, making it more complex to solve in the end. This may very well be a contributing factor as to why peace talks and negotiations have so far yielded few results.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:59 PM

Like many conflicts covered in the United States little insight is given into the origin of the event and instead on the present and most importantly how it affects us. This video gives a good understanding of how this conflict came about as well as a look into how the area stands today. For such a tragic and horrific event it is really unfortunate that so many in the west know almost nothing about this conflict.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 12:10 PM

In a country like Sudan who's wealth lies in its oil production its evident that these different groups would have conflict with one another. I believe that the government has decided to side with the Arab merchants because if the ties Arab merchants may have with the Arab world, turning a blind eye towards the turmoil Africans are faced with. Though the land has since been separated since the start of the conflict between these two groups, there is still a problem that this newly formed independent. With an unstable government and still having to face the problems of its past, South Sudan and Sudan have a long way to go before the tension between the two is resolved.

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Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
A former gang member from Long Beach, California, teaches break dancing to at-risk youth in Cambodia.

 

This video is a great example of cross-cultural interactions in the era of globalization.  Urban youth culture of the United States is spread to Cambodia through a former refugee (with a personally complex political geography).  What geographic themes are evident in this video? How is geography being reshaped and by what forces?

Martin Kemp's insight:

this is great, making the best of a bad situation and working with kids to make sure that they do not make the same mistakes as you did is a great thing. also the examples of cultural diffusion or great as well. everyone knows that there is nothign better for kids growing up than to be a part of after school programs where they can continue to learn different things.

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 30, 2015 3:10 PM

This video is a very important aspect to bringing two countries together. It not only brings out the a better education for the young people but it also bringsin one country with another giving it a similiar style. Break dancing in America and being taught in another country by someone who was here and then deported means that the countries will have a similiar thing in common. This man is teaching the foundations of a better life and a life without drugs and an intrigal part of adulthood so they are able to get jobs and a better way of living.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:15 PM

I thought this was a good video because it talks about a person who was probably living in the u.s. all his life and got hooked on the wrong side of the track and now forced to leave the u.s. The good news is he is seeing a country he was probably born in and never saw. he is able to bring with him some American culture such as breakdancing, music, his tattoos his English language. At the same time he is going to learn his culture.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:08 PM

this is a wonderful example of someone giving back to their adoptive [if ancestral] home. this is a good way to keep kids out of trouble while also introducing them to a new culture and style of dance.

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Burma: Motorcades and Dictator Disneyland

Burma: Motorcades and Dictator Disneyland | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Neil MacFarquhar, The Times's United Nations bureau chief, shares his ambivalence about covering the exotic global travels and diplomatic efforts of Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, particularly in closed nations like Myanmar.

 

Times as April 2012 as seen the military junta of Myanmar open up towards representative form of governance, paving the way for the country to one day become Burma once again.  This video provides insights into the isolated make-believe world of the military junta.  Why would moving the capital to the interior to Naypyidaw be significant?  


Via Seth Dixon
Martin Kemp's insight:

by moving the capital to the center of the country it is symbolic of the capital being accessable to the whole country and that the capital is equally concerned with everyone. 

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James Hobson's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:47 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 3)

This video offers valuable insight into the difference between what is meant to be seen and what else there is to see. "The Capital" really does seem like a fantasy world to me: isolated, decorated, and devoid of many inhabitants. As the title suggests, it's like marketing Disneyland as the typical American city. I was also surprised by how despite the low population in the capital city, a huge infrastructure exists as if a major influx of people were planned to have arrived by then. This can be a lesson on how even at the national level, some can talk the talk but not walk the walk, and how some things can look good 'paper', but not when reality hits.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:27 PM

Naypyidaw is the capital for the Junta and not the people of Burma. I find it troubling that even when officials come to visit Burma, they are given a tour that is heavily censored and hides them from people so they are not allowed to give their honest opinion of the Junta. The secretariat general of the UN is quickly whisk from place to place that the government approves and can manipulate to fit what they want the image they want to portray. 

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The Fastest Growing Economies

The Fastest Growing Economies | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
See how the world's largest and fastest growing economies change over time.
Martin Kemp's insight:

the most surprising thing about this is how india has one of the worlds largest economies but is far behind both the united states and china as well as many european countries in economic growth. also how china can have the worlds number one economy but the united states is so far ahead in economic growth numbers, i suppose that china will not be on top for very long.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 6:01 AM

growing

Loic's curator insight, June 16, 2017 9:17 AM

This interactive is simple but conveys some very powerful data.  Above is a still shot of 2014's fastest growing economies (you can also view the largest overall economies).  Another telling statistical ranking is the UN's Human Development Index; explore more global data on Google's Public Data


Tags: economic, visualizationstatisticsdevelopment, google.

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 9:32 PM
In this article lists the worlds largest economies.

1. Unites States
2. China
3. Japan
4. Germany
5. India
6. France
7. United Kingdom
8. Brazil 
9. Italy
10. Canada
11. Korea
12. Russia
13. Australia
14. Spain
15. Mexico
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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.
Martin Kemp's insight:

it seems that this a a recurring theme with china. disputed lands surround this country inside and out, they claim to own all of it as well. but when the people that live their claim to be independent and choose not to associate themselves with you than it creates and interesting dynamic.

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Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:11 AM

It is important to recognize that in a country so big, not everywhere is going to be the same. There is the city, the colder region, the dryer region, the warmer region, rural area etc. It is important to know that cultures are different as well. Some people refer to the red highlighted area s Xinjiang, but others call it Eastern Turkistan. Clearly, there are some cultural and political issues that reside in this area. The big concern is that the area is bordered to Central Asia and Eastern Asia as it has more Central and Eastern Asia characteristics as the people speak Turkic language and are predominantly Muslim. This goes to show that the Uygurs in this area are struggling to gain political power from China. Could there be a possible autonomy fight for this region? would it be politically and economically stable to stand on its own? 

James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 2018 9:52 AM
Very interesting. I am curious to know where this will lead to. There is something also unnerving about how most of us are never taught this in public schools even though it is a very big and very important topic. I can not image there being a split eventually over time, though there is no way that this area will stay as they are with the treatment of their government. This is surely a region to keep an eye on.
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 2018 4:06 AM
This article talks about how the "government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan." Usually when two groups or more have different names for the same place there is a political or cultural conflict happening in that country. 
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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Martin Kemp's insight:

now this is really interesting to see how china issues passports for disputed territories which they claim to be theirs, i can definitely see why places would be upset about this and how this map can be seen as incorrect.

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James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future. 

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Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."

Martin Kemp's insight:

i dont understand how a country like india that is mostly modern and on the world scale can still have such an ancient system of labeling people be such a prominent practice in their society, i hope modi gets elected so he can start to eliminate this

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:51 PM

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 4:58 PM
The caste system in India still takes place today because it is slow to change. Even though Gandhi went to extreme measures to end the caste system. A caste system is a hierarchy of beings based on heredity. So if your not one of the lucky ones who is born into a top caste there is virtually no way of climbing the social ladder. In elections in particular voters all across the nation are swayed by the caste of the candidates. Caste is also very prominent in rural areas. If someone were to marry someone of a lower caste in rural areas they could face death because that is disrespectful to the norms of these particular areas. Even though many caste laws have been eradicated to benefit the people its still the people that are practicing this tragic system. Its tradition to them, some cannot see past the social injustices that this type of system permits.
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Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.

Martin Kemp's insight:

i have tried to watch a cricket match before but it seemed so odd, i dont really fully understand the game but the people playing (especially inians) were playing more than a game, for them it seemed like they were playing for their country and it was a great honor to them. unlike a sport like soccer where people play for other countries teams.

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:36 PM

Re-scooped from Professor DIxon, I feel like most of have heard that soccer is every other countries favorite sport. This article makes it sound like that isn't true of India, where they have adopted so many British colonial influences, that Cricket may be the most popular sport in the country. I always wanted to try the sport. I played baseball through high school and the idea of using a flat bat seemed like it could make for a really good time. That, and not having to run the bases too!

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:19 AM

Why do Indians love Cricket? As with most modern day countries, colonialism has something to do with it. However, the British never intended to promote Cricket in India. It was the local elite of India that first pushed to incorporate the game into Indian culture. Desperate to gain the prestige that the British attached to the game, the elite began the practice of playing Cricket in India. In the years following independence, the game has spread to the other classes of Indian society. The game has become the national pastime for the nation.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:52 AM

this is an interesting reason for a game to spread. it was a game played by the elite, so it never really lost the appeal of being a sport of the rich.

 

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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    

Martin Kemp's insight:

i mainly find it amazing that slavery is still so commonplace in parts of the world. whether it is "illegal" or not is irrelivent in these parts of the world and child labor and slavery is such a dominating force in labor.

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8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 16, 2017 7:55 AM
This article and YouTube clip is talking about the child labor and modern slavery going on in West Africa. These regions are mostly used for cocoa bean plantations and harvesting. The guy leading this investigation also interviews people who are in charge of the chocolate making factories and asks them where the cocoa beans come from. Almost everyone answers, "the Ivory Coast" and have no idea what so ever what is actually going on there. They just order the amount of beans needed and have no clue what children have to go through to provide these people what they need. In this documentary they also interview some of the children having to go through this and it's very terrible and wrong. These children get taken away from their homes to work and get tricked that they're getting payed even though they don't get anything for all they do. In this clip I also get to see what the owners of the cocoa bean plantations say about what's going on and all the lies are just so silly and I cant believe what their thinking and why they're doing this.

This article connects a lot to what we've been working with in class. We even saw this movie about cocoa farms spread all over Wast Africa and this movie basically talked about the same things the other movie talked about. I enjoyed this movie a lot. Even though the information given was very sad and heart breaking I learned a lot of new things about the conditions of these slaves and and what they actually have to go through to please their "master" and how sad their lives are. When seeing this movie I just felt so bad and I just feel like I want to help these people so much.  
Ping Ping W's curator insight, February 15, 2018 11:33 PM

“Although slavery is no longer legal, there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa…”  Even though cocoa drinks are very delicious, have you ever stop to consider where how and who collected them? Here’s how they do it: slavery. It is still very common on cocoa plantations in West Africa. Children are smuggled from all over Africa (Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso, etc), then, they are placed on remote, isolated plantations. Also, thirty-five percent of world’s chocolate is produced by slave labour.

 

This helped me better understand Africa by informing me about how children were kidnapped and force to work...some children work at such a young age too. Before doing this research, I didn’t know how Cocoa even came to be! However, now that I know that children slavery was how cocoa was produced, it made me wonder if the factory knew? All the factory that bought their cocoa from Africa, do they know this is how they’re getting their products? And if they do, why don’t they do anything to stop children slavery or pay the workers at least? I think that cocoa factories in Africa must have really low budgets, or else they wouldn’t be kidnapping kids or adults to do the work in the form of modern slavery (without paying them too). 

K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, June 23, 2018 11:32 AM

The youth are not the only ones that have history and could improve or do things better or just in different way but the older generation also have our cross to bare. As this article i must admit put the fact that not everything that is seen as good come from good reasonings as chacolate is not seen as sinful when we purchase it from the store but to know that atleast some of it got its original origin from thd blood sweat and tears of others thru and by the means of slavery. Just because a thing is not counted as a sin in the eyesight of man it does not make it right to God. Just because slavery is no longer legal does not make it not done and even to the point we can become enslaved in the mindset.  Which is more crippling than the chains of bondage by being physically enslaved by others. 

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it

"If ever there was a demonstration of the power of science, it is the course of the fight billed 'Mankind v AIDS'. Until 1981 the disease (though already established in parts of Africa) was unknown to science. Within a decade it passed from being seen as primarily a threat to gay men, and then to promiscuous heterosexuals, to being a plague that might do to some parts of Africa what the Black Death did to medieval Europe. But now, though 1.6m people a year still die of it, that number is on a downward trajectory­, and AIDS rarely makes the headlines any more. How was this achieved?  The answer has two parts: sound science and international co-operation."

Martin Kemp's insight:

this is a media issue all over the world. focusing on one part of a story and not revealing the rest. people can focus on how bad things are or they can focus on the advancements and how much better things are than how they were and how they continue to get better, especially in regards to medical care in africa. their level of care is still just awful but is obviously steadily improving. especially in south africa.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 8, 2015 10:09 AM

Its taken very dedicated advocates, scientists, doctors, and nurses to turn the AIDs epidemic around.  When the AIDs epidemic emerged there was a lot of speculation about how you could contract the disease.  Again through science people became educated.  This is a monumental fete that the AIDs virus is on a downward trajectory.  Thank goodness for advances in science and international co-operation.  

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:07 AM

Over the last quarter century, the medical technology has ever so changed. Simple tests and modernized medications can help slow the progress of the HIV infection. The tests can tell if someone has advanced AIDS or early stages of the HIV virus itself. However, over the last year and a half, the epidemic has been placed on the back burner with the Ebola epidemic that has and still occurring. The fact that Ebola spread as rapidly as it did, shows that any virus or disease can spread extremely quick if someone comes in contact with bodily fluids of another human and can be contracted pretty quickly.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, October 17, 2016 1:55 PM
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NYTimes Video: Apartheid Haunts South Africa's Schools

NYTimes Video: Apartheid Haunts South Africa's Schools | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
Celia Dugger reports from the Kwamfundo School near Cape Town on South Africa's struggling public education system.

 

This poignant clip shows that South Africa may be in a post-apartheid era, but most certainly not a post-racial era as schools are as deeply divided as ever. 

Martin Kemp's insight:

what i dont understand is how south africa can be on such an upward trend which motivation and nationalism but the rest of africa just refuses to get on the same track. the success of south africa and their constantly improving country should be motivation and a model for the rest of the continent.

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Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 19, 2015 1:14 PM

It's difficult to overcome something as oppressive as colonial rule and apartheid. South Africa's schools are still trying do so in a post-apartheid era. Judging from this video, the students have the desire to learn and better themselves to become what the country needs in order to succeed but the teachers and education system itself lacks the desire. I loved seeing the that some of the students actually step up and take charge of the class to help them learn. It's difficult to educate youth if the teachers have no desire to do so and you can't expect the students to move on to college and become a doctor or a chemist if they are unable to pass their science class. It amazed me that with all the struggles these students were going through in their personal lives, they were upbeat and ready and willing to learn.

 

Also, the singing impressed. Not because they were good, but I imagined trying to get a class of 15 year old students in America that were not taking a specifically music class to sing. I could only imagine the groans and refusal to participate from them!

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:28 PM

Watching this video makes me glad that I live where I do, it also makes me feel bad for those that are not as lucky as myself and other students of colleges and universities. these students in South Africa's schools are not getting a proper education, the teachers sometimes do not show up, so in some cases the students will assume position and teach those who do not understand the material. It is also sad to know that there are so many out there with great ambitions for their lives and because of their poor education and understanding of subjects, they are failing and might not be able to reach their goals for life. It is good to see though there is a teacher that gets the kids engaged everyday  as a morning warm up to sing. 

Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 11:36 AM
It is so amazing to see students fighting to achieve in a struggling system. This video was talking about a struggling high school in South Africa, but that is honestly for far from what you see in the inner cities in the U.S. either. Everywhere more students are standing up and are bringing hope for a better future. These students in South Africa will grow up and, despite all the obstacles, they will do better. 
 
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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Geography Portfolio | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?

Martin Kemp's insight:

as we have seen in several articles before this is a large problem all over the world. mass population growth that the government can not keep up with will become a huge problem and lead to much more poverty. this needs to be handled carefully by individual governments and hopfully they can find a way to control this problem.

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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:31 AM

Within the other regions discussed in class, I can start to see how much of a global issue overpopulation is to the world. Alone, sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 12% of the global population and could possible go up to 1/3 by 2100. This is in incredibly huge number despite the time giving for it to occur. African suffers some similar problems as India. The areas are so overpopulated it becomes unsafe due to sanitation, water, food, and amongst all poverty. The big problem as well is that the generations are rather young. Nigeria is Africans most populous area. The poverty in this area where the power goes off in the middle of a birth and flashlights are being used in order to help the mother give birth. This is very important to analyze that not the proper equipment is giving for these people living in this region. The positive is that more people are being aware of pre contraceptives and seeking more family planning. 

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Chimamanda Adichie: The danger of a single story

"Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding."

Martin Kemp's insight:

this is a big problem in the world today in my mind. other places do not have the nationalism that is required to thrive. even this woman (who eventually became an exception) started off idolizing western countries. this is not inherently a problem but places do not try to make themselves better, the reason there is the perception of africa that there is, is because people like this woman are the exception. if more people followed her lead than the whole of Africa would not be seen this way.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:30 PM

This video is very interesting, in that Chimamanda Adichie tells the dangers of hearing a one sided story. It is easy to classify a country with the rest, but it is also inaccurate because they are not the same. This video reminds me of another titled "Media and Culture-- Perspective and Bias" which also takes on the idea of knowing only one side of a story or people. It is videos and people like Adichie and Reza Aslan (from the above mentioned video) that implore us to research and make ourselves knowledgable about a subject, culture, or people before making assumptions and making the mistake of grouping them together for the sake of an easy story.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:39 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon. This is an eye opening narrative on what it's like to be African. This video really made me question my own cultural biases and microagressions. Powerful piece.

Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 12:18 PM
This is such an important video. Everyone has this same bias that they fight against. You just make assumptions about people and about places from books you've read, movies or documentaries you've watched, or stories you've heard. It isn't until you wake up and pay attention that you notice what others are actually like. Today this is very important because every day I see more diversity in films or in media and I think about how that may change some young child's life, that they may see that their stories are important as well.