Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Chile’s Energy Transformation Is Powered by Wind, Sun and Volcanoes

Chile’s Energy Transformation Is Powered by Wind, Sun and Volcanoes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Once energy dependent, Chile is on track to become a renewables powerhouse with the potential to export electricity. Chile is on track to rely on clean sources for 90 percent of its electricity needs by 2050, up from the current 45 percent."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The definition of a natural resource changes as the societal and technological context shifts.  Firewood was once the most important energy resource and now there are tree removal companies that haul are paid to haul away what some would consider very valuable goods. The coastal breeze of the Pacific, the harsh sun of the Atacama desert, and the rugged volcanic landscapes of Chile were never an energy resources...until they were made so by technological advancements and shifting economic paradigms.  As this article and embedded video demonstrate, Chile and South America are fully investing in the transition from a fossil fuel-based economy to renewable energy resources.

 

TagsChileSouth America, industry, sustainabilityeconomic, energy, resources, unit 6 industry.

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The Environmental Cost of Consumption

The Environmental Cost of Consumption | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Environmental artist J Henry Fair captures the beauty and destruction of industrial sites to illustrate the hidden impacts of the things we buy – the polluted air, destroyed habitats and the invisible carbon heating the planet
Seth Dixon's insight:

This artistic portrayal shows the extent of the massive modifications we've made to the landscape with some striking examples.  Pictured above is one of 17 images in this article that promotes the launch of the new book entitled, Industrial Scars: the Environmental Cost of Consumption.  In the image above we see mountaintop coal mining in West Virginia.  "This lonely stand of trees disappeared in barely a day. The small bulldozer on the upper level pushes loose material down to the loader, which scoops it up into the next earth mover in line, which will in turn dump it into a nearby ‘valley fill’, burying the stream there." This might be the most beautiful and ugly set of images that you'll see today. 

 

Tags: pollution, industry, sustainability, images, art, landscape, unit 6 industry.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:28 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impacts of human use of resources. The beautiful images illustrate the extreme impact on the environment.
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:30 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impact of human activity on environments.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:37 PM

Production and consumption - interconnections and consequences 

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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?


Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.


Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.

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30 charts and maps that explain China today

30 charts and maps that explain China today | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China's mind-boggling size, economy and history, visualized.""

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 12:10 PM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:05 AM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 10:09 PM
In this article shows a map of how incredibly huge the Chinese population really is. each country and land area is sized proportionate to the population of each
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Organizing APHG content

Organizing APHG content | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Digital resources to strengthen the quality and quantity of geography education in classrooms the world over."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Since this site is updated daily and organized chronically, finding some of the best posts from the past can be difficult for someone new to the site.  Some of the posts are on current events and not as relevant several years after the fact, but I want to make it easier to find the older posts that are still relevant today more easily accessible.  I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.  Additionally, this Story Map will also guide you on how to get more out of this website.         

  1. Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)
  2. Population and Migration (shortlist)
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)
  4. The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)
  5. Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)
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Topaz Solar Farm, California

Topaz Solar Farm, California | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The new 550 megawatt facility in California produces enough electricity to power 180,000 homes.


The modules are part of Topaz Solar Farm, one of the largest photovoltaic power plants in the world. At 9.5 square miles (25.6 square kilometers), the facility is about one-third the size of Manhattan island, or the equivalent of 4,600 football fields.

Construction at Topaz began in 2011. The plant was mostly complete by November 2014, when it was turned on and began to generate electricity.


Tagsenergy, resources, unit 6 industry, California, images, remote sensing.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 24, 2015 4:01 PM

GRANJA SOLAR TOPAZIO EN CALIFORNIA. PROVEE ELECTRICIDAD A 180.000 HOGARES. PLANTA DE ENERGÍA SOLAR

 

María del Sol Guerra martín's curator insight, April 4, 2015 7:23 AM

In this text you will find information about a photovoltaic power  plant. Could you find information about photovoltaic plants in Spain?
Send the report before ....

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 7:20 PM

Seeing America taking steps in use solar power makes me incredibly happy. The US, in my opinion, needs to adopt multiple ways of utlizing various types of energy sources. The quote, "BHE estimates, that is enough to displace about 407,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year, the equivalent of taking 77,000 cars off the road" is impressive. However, I do feel that the auto industry is the environmental scape goat. The textile industry produces much more waste, especially with all of the advancements the auto industry has gone through.

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Why the side-hustle is key to Nigeria's economy

Nkem Ifejika meets with Nigerian entrepreneurs who show how the nation's economy is finding lubricants other than oil.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, laborNigeria, podcast

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Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:37 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 14, 2015 9:11 AM

unit 6

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, labor, Nigeria, podcast, 

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

"Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.
Related Article: http://nyti.ms/gSvOkM"

Seth Dixon's insight:

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today. 

2013 update: The paper plant is now officially closed  

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.

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Douglas Vance's curator insight, March 20, 2018 12:18 PM
The Soviet Union's command and control economy allowed totally impractical industrial ventures like a paper mill on Lake Baikal to exist. This mill only served to employ workers and produce a good that would be sold at a set cost where profit is irrelevant. However, the mill's location away from any industrial center or shipping hub made the operation of such an isolated factory in a capitalistic economy totally unfeasible. Also, factors such as the environmental perfection of the lake's ecosystem adds additional pressure to cease operations. What can function in the Soviet Union does not always survive the forces of political and economic changes. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 24, 2018 2:38 AM
This shines a light on a couple of different issues.  First, the economic implications of monotowns.  Monotowns are towns with planned formal economies that are based on one industry.  Other, small businesses pop up to cater to the needs of the people who work in that central industry.  These monotowns were utilized throughout the Soviet Union, and some survive today.  One example of such a town is Baikalsk, a town on Lake Baikal that is centered around a paper mill.  The economic well-being of every resident of Baikalsk--the mill's employees, their families, and the owners of small businesses in the town-- is based in the success of the paper mill.  But on the other hand, the process of paper making has been polluting Lake Baikal for decades, which has led to environmentalists campaigning for the mill to be closed.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 28, 2018 3:52 PM
Lake Baikal is in the middle of environmental destruction and the people of a small Siberian mono-town being out of work. This is a huge crisis because mono-towns are areas where the economy is revolved around one industry. The industry that is located around Lake Baikal is one that is severely polluting the Lake. The problem with shutting down this one industry which is a paper company is that all the people that live in this mono-town work at the paper company, so the whole community will be out of work. Lake Baikal could be a source of revenue for Russia as a whole however Putin is bypassing environmental guidelines to keep these workers in a job. Its sad that polluting the worlds deepest Lake is second to these workers. Ruining this lake will have a long term effect on Russia and it will not be good. There should better steps to be put in place to protect this natural wonder as well as keep people in work.
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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive; but I am of a fan of these list produced by Vox.  Not because they exhaustively explain the topic, but they give a strong visual introduction to a topic, such as this one on on the global economy.  


Tags: development, economic, globalization, industry, labor, unit 6 industry..

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  

Seth Dixon's insight:

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:17 PM

These vessels are specifically made to increase more profit and is a symbol of economic power for trades between Europe and Asia. They aim to increase containment of cargo so it is more efficient and time consuming of going back to fourth. However, they forced ports to become bigger to compete and keep up with these new inventions. These ships are getting too big and are only able to transit through the Suez canal and cannot go through the Panama. This lead to the Chinese expanding their reach to Nicaragua and building a larger canal to be able to pass through Central America.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:42 PM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.    

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 21, 2015 10:25 AM

Again, I would be interested in seeing how these statistics would change if they were to factor in illegal immigration from Mexico into the United States, but the data remains promising. Mexico has the potential to be an economic powerhouse, and hopefully will utilize this potential sooner rather than later. Although rampant corruption remains in the nation's politics and reinforcement agencies, a strong Mexican economy will ultimately deescalate the violence by stripping the cartels of their strongest allure- well-paying employment for uneducated young men. A stronger Mexican economy will also undoubtedly help the US in terms of trade, as well as reducing the rate of cartel-related violence in the southern regions of the nation. With so many Americans today rallying around Trump's racially-charged rants on Mexican immigration, it brings a smile to my face that we are currently sending more Americans to take Mexican jobs than they are sending our way. The hypocrisy of these politicians and their policies are laughable. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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Thinking Green in Pittsburgh

Thinking Green in Pittsburgh | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Pittsburgh, called 'hell with the lid taken off' in the 19th century because of its industrial filth, is now an academic leader in the green movement."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great article on regional sustainability initiatives and education in the Pittsburgh area.  Given Pittsburgh's history, that makes these clean industrial projects all the more impressive.    

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:10 AM

Strateies for sustainable urban development 

harish magan's comment, September 5, 2013 12:25 AM
I have requested many people in Authority to follow Pittsburg green example to protect environment and save future mankind from disaster which is hovering on our head.I thinks all major metro and cities should do some thing concrete to solve this gigantic problem.
harish magan's comment, September 14, 2013 4:25 AM
If this city and its governing body can do it any other metro city can also follow suit.Only thing is to take action and act on it. people can ask their respective city council to initiate efforts in this regard . If their citizen also take interest and raise their voice for this concept lot can happen soon.
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Self-driving technology and highway trucks with no one at the wheel

Technological innovation and automation are transforming entire industries. As self-driving trucks hit the road, what could possibly go wrong?
Seth Dixon's insight:

What jobs can be automated?  This is a question I ask all of my students because job disruption is something that every future wage earner should consider as they plan out their careers.  Would you be outsource-able? Could technology render your skill set unnecessary in the future?  What are the impacts of creative destruction on the economic, cultural, and political characteristics of a place?  How would those changes impact regions? 

 

Tagseconomicindustry, laborglobalizationtransportation, unit 6 industry.

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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, January 18, 2018 7:31 PM

Technology is transforming and changing the global economic order. This technology could change trucking and automobiles forever and prevent dangerous accidents.

Genesis Orellana Cabrera's curator insight, January 24, 2018 3:16 PM
This certainly has with geographical development. This technological innovation is an explanation of why some regions are richer than others. Technology continues to expand and with it, geographical development is growing, making the U.S richer. As it was said in the video, billions of dollars will be saved, but it is also known that jobs will go down as fewer truck drivers are needed in the industry. Technological improvement can bring good and bad to certain regions.  
 
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This is where your smartphone battery begins

This is where your smartphone battery begins | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Workers, including children, labor in harsh and dangerous conditions to meet the world’s soaring demand for cobalt, a mineral essential to powering electric vehicles, laptops, and smartphones, according to an investigation by The Washington Post.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is a land rich with minerals and resources vital for high end consumer goods (laptops, cellphones, electric cars, etc.).  This in-depth investigation from the Washington Post of the cobalt mining districts in the DRC (60% of global cobalt production) is incredible.  It has great videos, maps, and an detailed article that cuts across the geographic themes (exploited local labor, global commodity chains, political governance, polluted water supply, medical geography, etc.).  

 

Just two days ago, the United States pulled the families of all governmental officials out of the DRC amid political turmoil and violence in the streets of Kinshasa, highlighting the fact that the weakness of political institutions in the DRC are a major reason for this situation.  

 

Tags: Congolaborwatermedical, environmentpollution, political, conflict, resourcespolitical ecology, Africa.

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David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 29, 2018 3:36 PM
We take the luxuries that we have for granite and forget where it comes from, or who pays the physical price for us to have them. One example is electronics and the Congo. The Congo is a country filled with Colbolt which is critical to lithium batteries which powers majority of products that are rechargeable. The price they pay is unsafe mining conditions, indecent wages, and environmental hazards to local communities. 60 percent of the cobalt used today comes from the Congo, and while some companies track it to make sure its "clean" some companies do not check its origins. In 2010 there was a push to add cobalt to a list of resources that come from the Congo to be from a militia free mine. Individual companies have started to be stricter about where they get their Cobalt it's still not mandatory under international law. However with the demand for cobalt is increasing due to more electric power styling for vehicles and other products. In order to meet these demands the cobalt will continue to come from abused people until companies or international law limits and outlines how to deal with the cobalt question.
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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 2018 2:10 PM
Given the absurd amount of minerals present in the country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo should be basking in immeasurable wealth. However, as shown by this inetractive and enormously in-depth piece by the Washington Post, the country constantly struggles with child labor, water pollution, and widespread dangerous working condition because of the global demand for minerals like cobalt and copper. 
David Stiger's curator insight, November 10, 2018 4:05 PM
The Congo, like Venezuela, is another example of a post-colonial country rich in valuable natural resources whose people, ironically, live in abject poverty. The Congo is a victim of its own geographical blessings as the industrialized world's bottomless need for Congo's cobalt, copper, and other minerals has put this former colony of Belgium on the map. The Congo reportedly supplies half of the world's cobalt. With few other options for mineral sources, lithium-ion battery manufacturers turn a blind eye as Congolese "diggers" endure inhumane, dangerous, and unfair conditions to produce cheap cobalt. Companies have not reacted to this injustice because of a desire to maximize their profits. With Western consumers acting as indirect accomplices, China leads the pack of this neo-colonial process of exploiting the Congo for its valuable underground minerals. The Chinese companies offer so little money for the cobalt that workers are forced to put up with hazardous conditions and unbelievably low pay for their labor. 

The problem lacks an easy solution because it is highly complicated by the forces of globalization and geographical factors. Congolese diggers obtain the raw materials, who sell it to Asian middlemen, who then sell it to big Chinese manufacturers. These manufactures produce rechargeable batteries to sell to Western companies like Apple and Samsung. These products are then sold all over the world. The long supply chain makes it difficult for consumers to feel and see how their actions are impacting the lives of other people. The companies who should be held accountable justify their business decisions because there are not sources of cobalt to turn to. If there were other sources, companies like Huayou Cobalt could turn to other sources that treat their workers better, forcing Congolese suppliers to raise their labor standards. 

A short-term remedy, it seems, would be to classify Congolese-based cobalt as a conflict mineral. Western countries should fine and punish companies that are linked to the unjust cobalt trade, forcing these companies to raise their standards. 
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Visualizing the Global Economy

Visualizing the Global Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The graphic above (Voronoi diagram) represents the relative size of each country’s economy in terms of nominal GDP: the larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. The areas are further divided into three sectors: services, industrial, and agricultural. The US economy is mostly composed of companies engaged in providing services (79.7% compared to the global average of 63.6%), while agriculture and industry make up smaller-than-average of portions of the economy (1.12% and 19.1% compared to averages of 5.9% and 30.5%).

 

Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 4, 2016 10:18 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 8, 2016 11:39 PM
Quem e como está dentro?! 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 2017 11:10 AM
unit 6
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The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica

The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Understanding global trade and economic data can feel overwhelming, but fortunately there are online tools that help us to visualize complex economic data. The data in these charts was incredibly easy to gather, thanks to the Atlas of Economic Complexity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tagsindustry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 12:10 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tags: industry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

Matt Danielson's curator insight, September 24, 2018 1:42 PM
The Costa Rica economy has flourished under globalism. The environment was perfect for investment Given the well-educated labor force and stable government. This combination creates for the possibility for economic boom with the right investment. Once this investment was made, more jobs were created and exports skyrocketed, in a 17 year period exports went up to 11x what they were preciously. Even though this company is leaving Costa Rica I believe will find other investors. The tool to understand complex economies works great. In the example used you could see a country's growth in  a particular market and be able to judge efficiently how the market is growing and the shares of the market controlled. This makes it easier to see where one should invest his capital.
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Labor Day 2015

Strengthening America's workforce. Sharing stories, news and info on U.S. workers, jobs, employment, safety and regulations. Learn more at www.dol.gov
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights (see the Labor Day 2012 video as well).  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

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BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:06 AM

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights (see the Labor Day 2012 video as well).  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

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Creative Destruction

Creative Destruction | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It's much worse than people realize.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tagseconomic, laborglobalization, unit 6 industry.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:48 AM

We are becoming obsolete as a Charlie Chaplin film, perpetuate the grace of the silent film as the industry is all forward-talkie.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 12:11 PM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

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A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Because globalization.  


TagsTime-Space Compression, developmenttechnology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

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Gas Price Map

Gas Price Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Now you can see what gas prices are around the U.S. at a glance. Areas are color coded according to their price for the average price for regular unleaded gasoline. Click here for the Canada National Gas Price Heat Map."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In 2012, this visualization of gas prices by county in the United States was important because high gas prices were hitting Americans hard in the pocketbooks and became a major political hot-button topic.  Today, this map still shows the regional variations in prices (so sorry to my California friends), but the recent drop in prices makes most consumers give a sigh of relief.  Supply and demand works beautifully on a two-axis graph, but supply and demand happen somewhere, giving a simple chart added complexity since it's spatially contingent and we must make the assumption and caveat explicit.   


Questions to Ponder: Why are the prices for a certain commodity higher in one region than another?  What factors lead to the spatial differences in the relative economic value in one region over another? 


Tagsenergy, resources, unit 6 industry.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, February 17, 2015 10:57 AM

The willingness to pay more jacks up prices ...

Kyle Freeman's curator insight, March 24, 2015 4:27 AM

We can think about maps like these in order to understand the usage and application as well as the patterns and distributions into areas. This map is used to show consumers where the highest and lowest gas prices are by colors. There is a pattern of high cost in the south western and north eastern areas, while there is a pattern of low cost in the southern and north western areas.

Susan King Locklear's curator insight, October 20, 2015 5:56 PM

Looks like the Houston area is doing pretty well compared to the national average.

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

Nicole Canova's curator insight, January 18, 2018 7:10 PM
This video does a good job of explaining globalization and the effects it has on transportation, communication, economy, politics, and culture around the world.  It also discusses some of the consequences of the world becoming a smaller place.
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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The MPI was developed out of a desire to fill some of the gaps in the HDI's applicability and utility.  Allow me to quote the editor of one the NCGE's journals, the Geography Teacher, on the usefulness of the MPI website for classroom use: "With the infographics, maps, graphs, country briefings, and case studies, you have a ready-made lesson activities to demonstrate patterns of fertility, mortality, and health for a population unit, and access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation for an Industrialization and Economic Development Unit. Connections can also be made to malnutrition and water, as well as to key concepts such as pattern and scale, to key geographical skills such as how to use and think about maps and geospatial data, and to the use of online maps and online data."  Also, this article from the World Bank also give a run-down on the key findings of the MPI in 2014. 


Tags: statisticspopulation, development, unit 2 population, unit 6 industry.

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Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 4:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

The MPI was developed out of a desire to fill some of the gaps in the HDI's applicability and utility.  Allow me to quote the editor of one the NCGE's journals, the Geography Teacher, on the usefulness of the MPI website for classroom use: "With the infographics, maps, graphs, country briefings, and case studies, you have a ready-made lesson activities to demonstrate patterns of fertility, mortality, and health for a population unit, and access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation for an Industrialization and Economic Development Unit. Connections can also be made to malnutrition and water, as well as to key concepts such as pattern and scale, to key geographical skills such as how to use and think about maps and geospatial data, and to the use of online maps and online data."  Also, this article from the World Bank also give a run-down on the key findings of the MPI in 2014. 

 

Tags: statisticspopulation, development, unit 2 population, unit 6 industry.

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This Is What Detroit Could Look Like In 2033

This Is What Detroit Could Look Like In 2033 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you've never been to Detroit and only know what you see in the news, a story about the city's future could seem confusing. Detroit is bankrupt.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Yes, the news about Detroit has been grim, as de-industrialization has negatively impacted this region more than any other in the United States.  Still, many consider Detroit's economic problems akin to flesh wounds and organ failure.  Extending the analogy, they see Detroit as having 'good bones,' something to build on for a new future.  This article represents some visions of that new future.  


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 12:42 AM

2033 seems pretty hopeful for the city that was once the Ford motor capital and the city of Rock and Roll. It is interesting to note in this article the various before and after images and the way they hope that this bankrupt city be look in 15 years. There are hopes to completely transform certain landscapes and renovate old warehouses for recreational/educational purposes. There is hope for the city of Detroit as developers continue planning and working on investing money making condemned areas livable and changing the economic culture of each neighborhood.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:38 PM

Looking at these pictures it it is amzaing to think that by 2033 Detroit could look like this. However I think the most confusing part to me would be where the money is coming from to rebuild this city. The city was recently declared bankrupt. How is it that they are going to be able to afford the billions of dollars needed to get detroit to this point? However if the plan does go well and detroit ends up building all of these attraction sites and educational building I believe that Detroit will no longer have a fear of debt, and the culture there would be a lot different. I think this would be a place that families and people vaction to. There would be many nice state parks to visit, a beautiful downtown area with hotels and other attractions. This is the exacct opposite of the type of experience you would have going to Detriot today. By making these changes and moving forward I think there is a huge culture change to will occur for the better of Detroit. If they can pull it off I don't think Detriot will have to worry about bankruptcy in the future. 

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pollution is becoming ubiquitous in our urban environments.  If your primary concern is the environment, it is clear that this situation in Hong Kong must be changed.  But what if the environment is not the concern of policy makers?  What economic and planning arguments could you make in favor of a more sustainable course?


Tags: pollutionChina, development, economic, megacities, East Asia, industrysustainability, urban ecology.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:08 PM

Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:22 AM

Pollution is a huge issue facing both Hong Kong, and the rest of China in general. So far the government  has done little to actually combat the problem. The Chinese governments response has been to pretend that the problem does not really exist. A fake skyline can just erase the problem. In reality dealing with the pollution issue would actually help the Chinese economy. When people seek to go on a vacation, they are seeking a destination that is clean and safe. Who wants to visit a place were, you have to ware a mask to prevent the breathing in of armful chemicals. A cleaner less polluted china would lead to an expanded tourism industry.