Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior

The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The highly anticipated event is casting a long shadow online.

 

The upcoming solar eclipse is poised to become the “most photographed, most shared, most tweeted event in human history,” in the words of one astronomer. Millions of people will watch it, potentially overwhelming the cities and towns along the eclipse's path of totality.

According to Google, interest in the eclipse has exploded nationwide in the past few months, mirroring national media attention. The county-level search data above, provided by Google, paints a striking picture: Interest in the eclipse is concentrated in the path of totality that cuts through the middle of the country, receding sharply the farther you go from that path.

 

Tags: Sunspace, media

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Investing in Monumental Architecture

Investing in Monumental Architecture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

City Hall in Philadelphia is a fantastic example of using architecture to create civic pride by investing in iconic, public buildings. Monumental architecture helps to create a sense of place and communal identity. This building has open air access, making the public feel that this is more their building."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Question to Ponder: Is it "worth it" for government's to invest taxpayer dollars on ornate architecture? 

 

Tags: space, monumentsurban, architecture, place, landscape.

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The history of space exploration mapped

The history of space exploration mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Humans have dreamed about spaceflights forever but only in the second half of the 20th century were developed rockets that were powerful enough to overcome the force of gravity to reach orbital velocities that could open space to human exploration. The awesome poster called Chart of Cosmic Exploration documents every major space mission starting from the Luna 2 in 1959 to the DSCOVR in 2015. The map traces the trajectories of every orbiter, lander, rover, flyby, and impactor which ever left the Earth’s orbit and successfully completed its mission."

 

Tags: space, remote sensing, scale

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Unlocking The National Mall

Unlocking The National Mall | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Lisa Benton-Short, author of The National Mall: No Ordinary Public Space talks about the overlooked urban National park sites, getting inspired by her own neighbourhood, and more.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The National Mall has been transformed so much in that last 200 years.  Lisa Benton-Short, in this interview about her book says, "The Mall has been a place where I connect to American history and identity, and our country’s founding principles and ideals. It is place where you can feel the power of the monuments and memorials, the legacy of events, marches and protests. The Mall is an incredibly meaningful place. This book is the result of my intellectual curiosity as a scholar, but also my personal attachment to this place."

 

Tags: historicalspace, monumentsplace, landscape.

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ringacrux's comment, August 27, 2016 1:14 AM
Interesting...!!
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Doreen Massey on Space

Doreen Massey on Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In honor of the late Doreen Massey, an eminent geographer who died Friday at age 72, we repost her Social Science Bites podcast, which has long been one of our most popular. In this interview, Massey asked us to rethink our assumptions about space -- and explained why.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tagsspace, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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Michele Fitts Barnaby's curator insight, March 16, 2016 12:14 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond.

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 19, 2016 8:38 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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Navigating and Occupying Gendered Space

Navigating and Occupying Gendered Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How we occupy and move through space is based on many cultural norms and many of those norms and assumptions are based on gender." 


Tagsspace, gender, place, cultural norms, culture, perspective.

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Windows on Earth

Windows on Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.  Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach.  The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.  These images  help astronauts share their experience, and help you see Earth from a global perspective."


Tags: images, artspace, remote sensing, geospatial.

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tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 2015 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 2015 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 AM

It just doesn't get much cooler than this!

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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

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7 Steps You Can Take To Address Street Harassment

7 Steps You Can Take To Address Street Harassment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I used to think that street harassment was so entrenched in our culture and unchangeable. All I could do to address it was to cope - walk fast; avoid eye contact; pretend to be on the phone. But I got tired of feeling powerless and decided to respond to it and change the culture that allows it to continue.
Seth Dixon's insight:

People experience place and public spaces in very distinct ways--gender plays a crucial role in how we socially navigate in and through space.  This article about how women can address street harassment goes well with this additional article that tackles the problems with a society that normalizes street harassment


Tagsspace, gender, place.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:52 AM

Like how this can relate to the popular hashtag that started a few days ago: #YesAllWomen, which stands up for women and brings attention to the problems involving rape culture and how women should change their appearance and actions in order to feel safer in a society. Women shouldnt have to live in fear every day. I like that the hashtag doesnt target every man because of course not every man is a rapist but it does target rapists and focuses on the fact that all women have or will feel harrassed by a man sometime in their life and that the reason behind the hashtag.

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Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth?

Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Muslims call it the Noble Sanctuary. Jews and Christians call it the Temple Mount." 


What happens when various religious groups claim the same territory as their own?

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Mrs. B's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:08 AM

#Jerusalem

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 14, 2014 11:35 AM

This article and picture points out just how hard it is to “solve” the problems in Israel.  The constant overlapping of buildings on holy sites complicates the issues more than anything political ever could.  Belief is one of the biggest driving forces for conflict in the world and this illustration reminds us of that.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 1:54 PM

In some of the oldest civilizations on earth, religion is the most important aspect of life. There will always be extreme conflicts in these ancient areas all over religion.

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Bike Lanes

Seth Dixon's insight:

In a busy city like New York, there are never enough places for parking and lanes for traffic.  There is simply not enough space for the flow to be smooth and efficient.  Cyclists that attempt to assert their right to the street are often times referred to as cyclist activists or hipsters as though their activism or cultural differences makes them synonymous with an extremism that  is more easy to dismiss.  Many hold views that privilege a motorists right to space in the city above that of a cyclist.  I saw this tweet by a NYC cycling organization that referred to "activist drivers" who park in the bike lane as attempting to create a "guerrilla can lane."  They used the terms and language used against them and superimposed it on the larger motorist community which sees itself as having a more natural right to all space in the city.  This video embedded above is an excellent spoof and highlights the dangers of being a cyclist in a motorist-centric world.

    

Tags: transportation, cycling, urban, planning, territoriality, space.

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Sofia Speranza's curator insight, October 10, 2013 2:10 PM

BIKERS. be aware of dangers on the street path

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:27 AM

I find this to be very true. I have gone to big cities such as Boston and New York and it is always chaotic. I find that there is always terrible parking in the big cities. Also it seems very dangerous for the average civilian trying to get to his or her job on a daily basis. Me not being from around the area found it difficult to navigate.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:45 PM

Bikers in New York City should know better not to ride their bikes around the streets because it is so busy and the traffic can be difficult. I know people use bikes to commute to work or school but this is New Yorks job to create more bike paths for people who want to use their bikes to commute. This will be safer for people to ride their bikes whenever they want. 

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The Permanence of Geography

The Permanence of Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The current rise or durability of the economies of the Global South do not signal that economic geography does not matter, but that current investment has simply shifted.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In an era where globalization has rendered distances a minor barrier to diffusion, some have erroneously concluded that geography is no longer relevant to economic development and urban planning.  Nothing could be farther from the truth, but that doesn't mean that the 'old rules' of space and place aren't be re-written.  This is a nice article that discusses the continued importance of spatial thinking and geography for urban planning.


Tags: urban, planning economic, urbanism, globalization, unit 7 cities.

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Hope during Economic Crisis

Flashmob en Madrid (España) organizado por el programa de radio CARNE CRUDA 2.0 Martes y jueves, 16:00, http://www.carnecruda20.es Lunes, miércoles y viernes...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have previously posted on how successful flashmobs often times use public places in a way that symbolically merges the meaning of that space with the message of the that place.  This is a fabulous example of that and I find it incredibly moving and poignant, given the recent economic woes of southern Europe.  


As Jordan Weismmann said about this flashmob in the Atlantic, "I'm not sure if this video is more heartbreaking or heartwarming, but it pretty well captures what's going on in Europe's economy right now. While the day-to-day drama of the continent's debt crisis has subsided, painful austerity measures have helped leave huge swaths of the population jobless. In Spain, unemployment is at 25 percent."   

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Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 2:15 PM

We never know when we will make a difference in people's lives. Spain has undergone a very difficult time the last couple years...this is short video reminds us we all need to smile and enjoy no matter what!

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:46 PM
This video is a great example of what a difference someone can make. Before this group started playing, you could see that most of the people on that room looked down, but they certainly got some sun and happiness brought to them. It doesn't matter where in the world you are, the littlest things can certainly make a difference.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:21 PM

Flashmobs bring so much positive energy to any environment. In Madrid, this video shows how positive vibes from music are contagious and transmitted into positive energy at an unemployment office. "Here comes the Sun" is a way of saying things are going to get better, just look at the bright side. 

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Great American Eclipse

Great American Eclipse | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A total solar eclipse is coming to America on August 21, 2017. Find maps, videos, how to view, best places to go, eclipse glasses, and more."

 

Tags: Sunspace.

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'Charging Bull' sculptor says New York's 'Fearless Girl' statue violates his rights

'Charging Bull' sculptor says New York's 'Fearless Girl' statue violates his rights | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Arturo Di Modica says ‘advertising trick’ placed in Wall Street before international women’s day infringed artistic copyright
Seth Dixon's insight:

The meanings embedded in the cultural landscape can shift, and often carry meanings that the artists, architects, and planners never intended.  Certain meanings in the landscape are going to be more valuable to particular cultural groups and there will always be attempts to shape the narrative about the meanings of a given place and what it 'should' be.  Power and resistance to power are both deeply ingrained in many landscapes.  

 

Tags: gender, space, monumentsurban, architecture, NYC, place, landscape.

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The Autumnal Equinox

The Autumnal Equinox | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the Northern Hemisphere, the fall equinox marks the first day of fall (autumn) in what we call astronomical seasons. There's also another, more common definition of when the seasons start, namely meteorological definitions, which are based on average temperatures rather that astronomical events.  Equinoxes are opposite on either side of the equator, so the autumnal (fall) equinox in the Northern Hemisphere is the spring (vernal) equinox in the Southern Hemisphere and vice versa."

 

Tags: Sunseasonal, space.

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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2016 2:46 AM
The Autumnal Equinox
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 6, 2016 9:40 PM
Simple explanation of the Equinox.
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NOAA's GFS model visualized on NOAA’s Science on a Sphere

NOAA's powerful Global Forecast System model was upgraded on May 11, 2016, providing forecasters with a more accurate 4-D picture of how a weather system will evolve. The upgrade is the latest of a number of model improvements rolling out this spring and summer, thanks to increased supercomputing power NOAA acquired earlier this year.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There's some good science with practical applications underneath this very artistic rendering of the planet's atmosphere...it is more fluvial than we give it credit for if we only think of air as empty space.  This video also reminds me of the words of one pilot and his perspective on both the atmosphere and Earth from above: "Geographically speaking, the sky is like a whole other planet encasing our own."

 

Tags: atmosphere, space, video, physical, fluvial.

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Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall

Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The government approved a plan to allow pluralistic, and mixed-gender prayer, at Judaism’s holy site.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, Israeli policewomen have detained members of the religious group Women of the Wall for breaching orthodox rules governing prayers at the site. This is Judaism's most holy site and orthodox traditions have legally prevailed here, defining who could be there and who could perform which religious rites (often on gender lines).  This fight represents a struggle to redefine the meaning and usage of public space in Jerusalem (among other complex issues).  The article states that "this marks an unprecedented move by the Israeli government to officially recognize the rights of Conservative, Reform and other Jewish denominations to hold organized prayer at the site."

 

Tags: Israel, culture, genderspace, religion, Judaism,
Middle East.

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aliyah marie scarb's curator insight, April 7, 2017 11:45 PM
this relates to what we are learning in world cultural human geography class because religions have variously different symbolic traditions. Science and religion argue all the time, but they increasingly agree on one thing: a little spirituality can be good for your health. Religions cover the faith angles of the world's biggest beliefs and Israel does it in their own special way, just as much as any other religion. 
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 2017 10:41 AM
Unit 3 - Religion, Unit 4 - Multinational States, Sateless Nations, Gender, Ethnicity
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 29, 2018 7:49 PM
(Middle East) Last year Israel outlined a strategy to create an equal prayer space on the Western Wall. Traditionally, the wall is split into separate sections for men and women, with stricter rules for women per the Orthodox beliefs. However, Israel has now allowed the right for other Jewish sects to pray at the wall, promoting the idea that Israel is a state for all Jews and leading to dissent of the conservative Israeli elites. It is interesting to note the privileges the Orthodox Jews hold over other denominations, let alone the Palestinians, and this act will further the view of Israel's purpose as a unified Jewish homeland.
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Solar Dynamics Observatory

""February 11, 2015 marks five years in space for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which provides incredibly detailed images of the whole sun 24 hours a day. Capturing an image more than once per second, SDO has provided an unprecedentedly clear picture of how massive explosions on the sun grow and erupt ever since its launch on Feb. 11, 2010. The imagery is also captivating, allowing one to watch the constant ballet of solar material through the sun's atmosphere, the corona."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As Phil Plait states in this Slate article, "There’s so much to take in there. Rolling sunspots, eruptive prominences, collapsing filaments, solar flares, the Transit of Venus (twice!)…SDO is far more than I imagined, and has revealed our active and complex star far better than anything before it."


Tags: Sunspace, video.

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Gravitational Pull

Gravitational Pull | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Revolution and rotation are the terms we use to describe the motions of the earth and moon. Revolution is the movement of the earth in an orbit around the sun.  The Earth completes one revolution around the sun every 365 days. The moon revolves around the Earth about once every month.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Understanding the relationships between the Sun, Earth and moon are critical for for understanding the seasons, climate and other geographic factors.  This interactive simulates gravity unlike anything I've every seen on a computer screen. 


To exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

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Barbara Goebel's curator insight, December 23, 2014 10:41 AM

Writing prompt: Specify a set of objects to put in motion, have them observe the interactions of the objects, then write to describe. For younger students, supply an observation organizer note sheet. For older students, the descriptions can be as technical as their math understanding will allow. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 2015 9:06 PM

It's pretty simple, the bigger the particle is, the bigger it's atmosphere is to allow more gravity. For example, Jupiter is the largest planet which is in favor to Earth. The reason why is because Jupiter uses it's large mass to protect Earth from oncoming meteors and comets. It uses it's large atmosphere to absorb comets and meteors onto Jupiter instead of allowing them to crash onto Earth. 

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Earth's Cosmic Context

"Superclusters – regions of space that are densely packed with galaxies – are the biggest structures in the Universe. But scientists have struggled to define exactly where one supercluster ends and another begins. Now, a team based in Hawaii has come up with a new technique that maps the Universe according to the flow of galaxies across space. Redrawing the boundaries of the cosmic map, they redefine our home supercluster and name it Laniakea, which means ‘immeasurable heaven’ in Hawaiian.  Read the research paper here."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Spatial thinking and geographic exploration is constantly seeking to understand place in context to other places.  More often than not, that is done without every venturing beyond this planet, but in many respects, space is the greatest of contexts on the grandest of scales for us to understand ourselves.  I first saw this video embedded in an NPR article and it filled me with wonder to think about the immensities of space and that the Earth is such a small little corner of the universe. 


Tags: space, scale, perspective

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Seeing Equinoxes and Solstices from Space

From the Smithsonian Magazine: "

Today, March 20, is the vernal equinox, the official start of spring. (Or, in the southern hemisphere, autumn. Sorry.)  We celebrate two main sets of holidays pegged to the orientation of the Earth vis-à-vis the Sun—the “equinoxes” and the “solstices.” A few years ago the team at NASA's Earth Observatory used observations from a EUMETSAT meteorological satellite to make the video above, which shows what the solstices and equinoxes look like from space.

On the equinoxes, like the spring equinox today or the fall equinox in September, the length of the day and night are as close as they'll get. The northern hemisphere's summer solstice, in June, is the day with the most hours of sunlight. The winter solstice, in December, has the least daylight. All of it has to do with the fact that the Earth's rotation axis is tilted 23.5 degrees relative to the orbit we take as we circle the Sun.

For those inclined towards exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

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National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality

National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the end, rank falls away
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Veteran's day many will go to cemeteries to remember fallen soldiers.  These are secular sites, but still sacred space to many.  The sanctity of these places are intentional and considerable planning goes into the spatial layout and design of the cemeteries.  Enjoy the day off for Veteran's Day, but don't forget to remember.

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Expert's comment, November 11, 2013 6:42 AM
Hi, I'd be happy if you visit my site? http://oyunskor.toretto.org
Caren Izzo's curator insight, November 11, 2013 11:09 AM

Veterans' Day today.  Thank a vet for their service.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 11, 2013 12:44 PM

If you have never visited a veterans cemetery, I think it is important to go and just visit even if you do not have a realtive there.  These men and women gave their lives for us in one way or another.  No matter what creed, what belief or which religion they followed all are treated with same care.  If you really want to see an amazing site goto a US Military Cemetery overseas.  These gaves are maitained by the locals, French, Italians, Ducth, etc.  They keep them neat, clean, with flowers and make sure our soldiers that died for them are not forgotten.  The one overlooking Normandy is amazing.  I have had the privledge to visit the US Cemetary near Rome and the feeling you get...well undescribable.   Take a look here for a view of these cemeteries.  http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/index.php

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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).


TagsSaudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:24 PM

I was happy to see an article like this. It's about time that these women are being given equal opportunities. Although they have a long way to go this is a step in the right direction. Saudi Arabian girls are being allowed to have sport related activities within their private schools. This did surprise me a little just because Saudi women's rights are very limited but this is a simple improvement just to the general health and well being of these girls. Two females competed in the last years summer Olympics representing Saudi Arabia and their efforts were not shown on Saudi TV. These women competing has opened a few doors to allowing more than just men to engage in these activities. Usually sports were only for the elite women who could afford gym memberships or attend well known colleges. Even though women cannot compete internationally or sign up for clubs or leagues this is a step in the right direction.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:47 PM

This is an interesting article about slowly allowing women in Saudi Arabia to participate in sports. While playing soccer or swimming or running may not seem so important to us in the West, it is a big deal for Saudi women. Saudi Arabia has some of the strictest laws in the Middle East regarding women's rights, and so even a very partial and gradual allowance for women to engage in sports is a big step. It shows perhaps a slight softening of adherence to Shariah law, which would hopefully eventually allow women more freedom in the realms of education and work, as well as in everyday life. 

 

Too often are people quick to judge and characterize other cultures or religions by the most extreme examples. While it is true that laws in Saudi Arabia are extremely restrictive to women, progress such as this, though small, may well act as a stepping stone for increased freedoms for women. People outside of Saudi Arabia and Islamic culture must realize that this kind of progress does happen and is, in fact, happening right now. To simply dismiss Saudi culture as misogynistic and oppressive is to write the whole culture off. While progress is slow and less than ideal, we should look to Saudi Arabia's Islamic neighbors and see that many of them are not so oppressive to women. Allowing Saudi women to participate in sports, therefore, may be setting up the country to increase women's rights and join its relatively more liberal neighbors. This is certainly a sign of positive change, and one that should not be ignored. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:28 AM

I was quite shocked to hear of this story. There is no denying, that this is a step forward for the women of Saudi Arabia. However, women are far from free in this country. The activates still have to be in accordance with Islamic Law. The strict dress code also remains in effect for the girls. The Sports themselves, must be overseen by women teachers. I would not call this initiative the Saudi equivalent of title nine, but it is a step forward. Every little inroad, is a step towards more equality. The government of Saudi Arabia appears to be at least slightly altering its view of women. Hopefully this will be the first step in movement to gain Saudi women more rights. In generations to come, hopefully Saudi women will look back on this development as the start of a cultural revolution in Saudi Arabia.     

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Successful Implosion of South Bay Power Plant on Saturday morning

Successful Implosion of South Bay Power Plant on Saturday morning | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The South Bay Power Plant was imploded Saturday Feb 2, 2013
to clear the way for development along Chula Vista's bayfront.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This powerplant was demolished primarily because of location (watch the cool videos of the implosion).  The electrical powerplant provided energy for the region, but it's location right on the San Diego Bay doesn't line up with current land uses.  When the area's economy was focused more on manufacturing, this was seen an ideal way to use the wetlands on the bay.  Today our city planning priorites has shifted.  First, how we view wetlands has changed and we no longer see them as "wasted" space.  Second, an attractive waterfront that can be used to generate tourism is seen as a greater economic priority today than it was 50 years ago.  

 

Tags: location, planning, economic, space, industry, California


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:59 PM

 


It seems that getting rid of this power plant was a great step for the city of San Diego. This plant was doing no good for them because it was taking space that could have been used to attract people from all over the world they could have added a many stores and other cool things that would create hundreds of jobs for local people who are struggling to make ends meet. The explosions were cool it was amazing how they feel in a line back to back. The explosion was a success for the city of San Diego. With all this new space available more people are going to invest in the city in which it will become much more popular than what it is now.