Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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How Instagram Is Changing the Way We Design Cultural Spaces

How Instagram Is Changing the Way We Design Cultural Spaces | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As neighborhoods, restaurants and museums become more photogenic, are we experiencing an 'Instagramization' of the world?"

 

Penang is one of a number of cities capitalizing on the wild popularity of photo-based social media apps such as Instagram, which has 800 million users (that’s more than a tenth of the world’s population). It’s part of a wider phenomenon of public and private spaces being designed to appeal to users of such apps. This phenomenon is subtly changing our visual landscapes—on the streets, in restaurants, in stores, in museums and more. Call it the “Instagramization” of the world.

Restaurants have been at the forefront of Instagramization. Since social media mentions can make or break a restaurant’s success, owners have become attuned to what visual aspects of food and décor appeal to customers. Restaurant designers are going for photo-friendly background materials like slate and whitewashed wood, and using plain white plates. Some are deliberately incorporating Instagram-appealing visuals that feature the restaurant’s name or logo—floor tiles, neon signs—hoping they’ll wind up in a snap.

 

Tagssocial mediaplaceculture, architecture, urban.

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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, 25 January 2018, 17:12

Over the course of years Instagram has become increasingly popular and especially in Penang. Penang is one out many cities capitalizing on photo based social media such as Instagram. This phenomenon is changing our landscapes, streets, museums, in restauraunts and stores. We call it Instagramization.

James Piccolino's curator insight, 26 January 2018, 00:38
I am admittedly a little bit torn on whether this is a good or bad thing. This "Instagramization" does drive art and restaurants to look better, but is it for the right reasons? I have an Instagram, and I do these very same things, but I still have to question the motivations. Are we appreciating art again for the right reasons? Long ago we as humans had an appreciation for art stretching all the way back to cave paintings on walls, long before social media. This trend of only now getting so much into art seems to be more for personal branding, showing off, and trying to impress our friends/followers, maybe even impress ourselves on a deeper level. If we did not hashtag and get likes for our artsy pictures, would we still be so ready to post them, or love them? Do we love the creative world around us? Or do we love what the art around us does for us? There is nothing really wrong with either, but it is a question to consider. The restaurants and tourist spots would probably say "Who cares?" and who could really blame them? They benefit, which is a great thing. I guess when it comes down to it, whether it is for ourselves or for a love of various forms of expression, it is a nice thing that humanity is getting into art again.
Matt Manish's curator insight, 31 January 2018, 21:13
This article helps to explain the interesting topic of social media in this current age and how it is shaping our culture. Author of the article Emily Matchar points out how many places in big cities are becoming more and more visually appealing for tourists and customers to come and take pictures for Instagram. She further gives examples of this by how restaurants are putting much more thought into designing their establishments than ever before in hopes that their customers will take a picture there and upload it Instagram. These, restaurants are also creating dishes and beverages that are more colorful as well as pleasing to look at to encourage their customers to post a picture of their food online. Posting these pictures online benefits these restaurants by helping increase their presence online leading to a potentially larger customer base. Matchar goes on to say how this not only changes the way restaurants are trying to use social media to their advantage, but how many other businesses and public places are trying to as well. Pointing out that even museums are coming up with more interactive exhibits for attendees to take pictures of. Overall, I found that this article had an insightful view into the power of social media and how it is molding the way we look at things in our world.
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xkcd: A Critique of Viral Maps

xkcd: A Critique of Viral Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 'map' is a pithy and quite pointed critique of the many maps that get shared on social media claiming to be based on big data, but they might be more fluff than true substance. 

 

Tags: XKCD, infographic, mapping, social media, cartography.

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Flat Earth Theory

Seth Dixon's insight:

I think we all need a laugh sometimes.  Flat earth videos are incredibly entertaining.  

 

DISCLAIMER THAT I WISH I DIDN'T HAVE TO MAKE: I don't believe in the flat Earth theory and think that this video is total jibberish; but it is delightfully inaccurate!  This is a good way to get students to think critically about epistemology (how we know what we know) and defend their own world view.  This also helps students to assess the validity of online sources

 

Tagsfun, mapping, social media.

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Trailer: One Day on Earth

"One Day on Earth is a unique global movement, community media creation platform, and collaborative film production engine. We invite you to join our international community of thousands of filmmakers, hundreds of schools, and dozens of non-profits, and contribute to this unique global project (with a map of all participants). Many future filming events will be announced in the coming year. One Day on Earth is a community that not only watches, but participates."

 

Tagsvideo, mapping, social mediaplaceculture.

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Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?

Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Reports of bombings tend to get huge numbers of mentions on social media, but that doesn't always mean a similar level of news coverage.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The short answer is obviously "Yes."  Yet, this question brings up other questions about cultural empathy and how 'connected' we might feel to people of other places than our own global neighborhood.  This political cartoon-ish map

has more truth in it than we might like to admit; it is subtitled 'How terrible it is the the Western world when a tragedy happens in...?'

 

Questions to Ponder: Does the 'where' influence if we perceive the event as a true tragedy or not (or maybe just the magnitude or importance of the tradegy)?  How come?  What does this say about us as inidividuals, society, and the media?  How can we teach our students in a way to foster more cultural empathy?

 

Tagssocial mediaplaceculture, political, terrorism, media. 

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jorden harris's curator insight, 4 April 2016, 14:52

to me it is mind boggling how we can pay more attention to countries with national threats than others especially with ISIS being so prominent which is a war that is going to take help from not only the united states but the other affected countries

                                                                                                        - J.H

Logan scully's curator insight, 4 April 2016, 15:11
It somewhat bothers me how that terrorist attacks outside of Europe and North America is pretty much just ignored by the social media while people are sitting in the hospital for crimes in which terrorists and other religious radicalists have done to their area and country.-L.S.
Brealyn Holley's curator insight, 7 April 2016, 15:20
For the question "Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?" In my opinion the answer would be yes because a lot of the terror attacks in the Western world are bigger and are expected more than terror attacks near  us. ~BH
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A Geotaggers' World Atlas

A Geotaggers' World Atlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every city has a picturesque spot or two where the probability of a photo being taken at any given time is pretty high. Now there's a world atlas of maps showing the routes people follow while taking these pictures in every city around the world:Mapbox's Eric Fischer has been working on the "Geotaggers' World Atlas" for five years, using locations of photos uploaded on Flickr over a decade. In his city maps, which now span the world, he connects the dots between subsequent photos taken by a photographer—representing their path in sketchy lines that criss-cross across the city."

 

Tags: mapping, visualizationsocial media, tourism.

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The Geographically Uneven Coverage of Wikipedia

The Geographically Uneven Coverage of Wikipedia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map points out the highly uneven spatial distribution of (geotagged) Wikipedia articles in 44 language versions of the encyclopaedia. Slightly more than half of the global total of 3,336,473 articles are about places, events and people inside the red circle on the map, occupying only about 2.5% of the world’s land area.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Crowdsourcing is a powerful way to leverage modern digital sharing capabilities, but it inherently going to lead to inequities in the reporting coverage.  Why are there so many geo-tagged Wikipedia articles in Europe and not as many elsewhere?  What factors account for these discrepancies? 


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturetechnology, popular culture, Europe.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, 17 September 2015, 14:36
The Geographically Uneven Coverage of Wikipedia
David lyon's curator insight, 23 September 2015, 22:00
A reflection of language diversity in Europe or a Eurocentric Wikipedia?
Chris Costa's curator insight, 7 October 2015, 19:56

Talk about Eurocentrism. I'm a huge fan of Wikipedia for its value as an informal source of information; if I need to learn about a topic I am not familiar with, Wikipedia is a great place to get a preliminary idea of what I am learning about. It's disappointing to see the distribution of information on the site is so skewed, considering that there are so many other regions of the world with long, rich histories, than just those encompassed within the circle shown in the map. I feel like that is symptomatic of a number of issues currently plaguing western academic circles- we tend to not view the rest of the world as being important, which is not only untrue, it's both insulting and ignorant. I hope this disparity is addressed and corrected over the course of the next couple of years.

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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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GeoEd Tweets

I don't have enough time to comment on every link that I think would be of interest to you, so I've archived some tweets with likes that I think are worth exploring.


Tags: geography education, social media, teacher training.

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Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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These maps depict the world's news in real time

These maps depict the world's news in real time | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An experimental tool to understand the world.
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Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 13:49

I think this is an interesting representation to show how the ability to have access to news and internet is the new most important thing to have to get word out. Now if you can speak English and have a computer with internet access you can.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 14:14

This map allows people to understand the flow of news from around the world. We can use it to see where and what is happening and chart it to connect trends for example Syria and France are large because of the recent happenings with terrorists and terror attacks.

MsPerry's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 14:30

Intro

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GeoEd on Social Media

I don't have enough time to comment on every link that I think would be of interest to you, so I've archived some tweets with likes that I think are worth exploring.


Tags: geography education, social media, teacher training.

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GeoEd on Instagram

GeoEd on Instagram | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Fascinating combination of old urban sophistication, modern consumerism and the new spatial demands of the automobile. Spotted in Washington D.C., on the corner of 10th and G."

Seth Dixon's insight:

So apparently Instagram's a thing.  Anyway, I created an account to share some on the physical and cultural landscapes that I find intriguing.  I also curate other pages here on scoop.it including:


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Bad Internet Maps: 'A Social Media Plague'

Bad Internet Maps: 'A Social Media Plague' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Business Insider’s widely mocked, since-deleted-from-Twitter, but very very viral map of the most popular fast food restaurants by state is the launching-off point for The Ringer’s Claire McNear, who rants about the maps clogging the Internet that are stupid, uninformed, wrong and exist only to generate clicks."

 

Tags: mappingsocial media, cartography.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, 17 February 2018, 05:47
This article talks about the many fake maps arising on the internet in order to get likes or for people to re-share it. Many times there are maps with incorrect data going around on the internet because some people want their content to go viral so bad they are willing to make up statistics in order for it to do so. This is why it is always important to check the sources for content you come across, and not just believe every piece of material you come across on the internet. Too many times people are misled by false information on the internet because they don't check the source it came from. As technology like the internet becomes more advanced, hopefully we will become more skilled at discerning false information such as fake maps on the web.
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#APHGchat--Population

This isn't a complete archive of yesterday's #APHGchat on Population resources, but I'm sharing this to give a peek to the networking that is available online.  The next #APHGchat will be Oct. 18th, 9pm EST. 

 

Tags: social media, APHG.

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Linking the most interesting places in the world

Linking the most interesting places in the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every city has a picturesque spot or two where the probability of a photo being taken at any given time is pretty high. Now there's a world atlas of maps showing the routes people follow while taking these pictures in every city around the world:Mapbox's Eric Fischer has been working on the "Geotaggers' World Atlas" for years, using locations of photos uploaded on Flickr over a decade. In his city maps, which now span the world, he connects the dots between subsequent photos taken by a photographer—representing their path in sketchy lines that criss-cross across the city." 

  ---Tanvi Misra on CityLab

 

Tags: mapping, visualizationsocial media, tourism.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder:

  1. How does the idea of crowdsourcing influence modern-day cartography and geographic data?
  2. What kind of meaning is there in this seemingly random assortment of geotagged images?
  3. Analyze a particular pattern (anywhere in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
  4. Analyze a particular pattern (somewhere else in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
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Leah Hood's curator insight, 22 August 2017, 21:30

Questions to Ponder:

  1. How does the idea of crowdsourcing influence modern-day cartography and geographic data?
  2. What kind of meaning is there in this seemingly random assortment of geotagged images?
  3. Analyze a particular pattern (anywhere in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
  4. Analyze a particular pattern (somewhere else in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
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Crafting a Sense of Place

Crafting a Sense of Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Talk about creating a sense of place! This neighborhood in #Covington draws on German roots to create a restaurant/pub district. Even the non-German restaurants in the area evoke an old world cultural landscape aesthetic in a way that makes the neighborhood appealing to visitors and prospective residents. #culturallandscape #placemaking."

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love exploring the cultural landscapes in and around Cincinnati every year during the #APHGreading.   

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscapeurban, place, social media, APHG, Cincinnati

 

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Why should we teach geography?

Why should we teach geography? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One reason why geography has languished in the curricula of many American schools is that so few people understand the nature of the discipline or its relevance to our everyday lives. What is geography? What is its unique perspective? What do geographers do? Why is geography important? Why should we teach (and learn) geography in the schools? These are questions that have gone largely unanswered in American education. This brief essay presents an easily taught, understood, and remembered definition of geography."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Why does geography education matter? This poster nicely summarizes the classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for high school and college student to read since it is very accessible.

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Jacob Clauson's curator insight, 3 March 2016, 13:30

Why does geography education matter? This poster nicely summarizes the classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for high school and college student to read since it is very accessible.


Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, 9 March 2016, 04:43

Why does geography education matter? This poster nicely summarizes the classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for high school and college student to read since it is very accessible.


Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, 10 March 2016, 11:09

Why does geography education matter? This poster nicely summarizes the classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for high school and college student to read since it is very accessible.

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Fuzzy Borders

TagsCanadalanguage, social media, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The idea behind this sprawling checkerboard emerged after the Revolutionary War. As the United States expanded westward, the country needed a systematic way to divide its newly acquired lands. The original colonies were surveyed using the British system of 'metes and bounds,' with parcels delineated using local geography.  


That approach doesn’t scale very well, and Jefferson proposed to slice the young United States into gridded plots of land.  Jefferson's idea became a reality in 1785 when it was enacted as the Public Land Survey System. Today his grid covers much of the country, and it is still used to survey federal lands — an idea that shaped the physical landscape of half a continent."


Tags: images, land use, landscape, social media, planningspatial, scale, historical.

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Dyna-e International's curator insight, 1 September 2015, 17:32

No such thing as being off the grid really.  ~ Ron Sandack

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, 8 September 2015, 18:05

unit 1 and 4

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Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos

Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tourists and locals experience cities in strikingly different ways. To see just how different these two worlds are, have a look at the map of Washington D.C. above based on where people take photos. The red bits indicate photos taken by tourists, while the blue bits indicate photos taken by locals and the yellow bits might be either."

Seth Dixon's insight:

It amazes me how the same city can provide such diverse experiences to so many people.  Growing up in San Diego, going to the zoo was only our family's radar when company was over and they wanted to "see San Diego."  Their vision of the place, what is iconic and what is quintessentially symbolic of that place, was different from my own. 


Questions to Ponder: What are some other ways (besides local/tourist) that a place can be experienced by other groups?  How many of these 136 cities can you identify from these tourist/local patterns? 



Tagsmapping, social media, urban, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Marc Meynardi's curator insight, 24 August 2015, 12:44

Very interesting

 

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, 3 September 2015, 15:32

cities photos

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What's in a Name?

"It's Swanzey in New Hampshire and Swansea in Massachusetts, but they are both pronounced the same. Other names like Albany are spelled the same but pronounced very differently in New York than it is in the city in Georgia with same name. First settlers of an area often named places after something to remind them of a place left behind (like Swansea, Wales)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

So apparently Instagram's a thing and I'm giving it a go; I created an account to share some on the physical and cultural landscapes that I find intriguing.  The Swansea/Swanzey town names in New England caught my eye and was one of my Instagram posts (usually I will NOT share them here).  I also curate other scoop.it pages including:



Tags: geography education, social media, teacher training.

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3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus

3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many people posting it wrote that the photo was taken during the recent Nepal earthquakes, and that it depicts 'a brother protecting his sister.' Pretty heartwarming, right? It’s the exact sort of thing your aunt would share on Facebook. A perfectly clear, resonant message about survival and empathy and inequality, all that good stuff.  There’s only one problem: That picture is fake."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've added this article to my list of resources to help geography students to be able to assess the validity of online resources. 


Tags: social media.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 15:43

course resource, life resource :)

Eden Eaves's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 18:05

This picture supposedly taken in Nepal of a brother protecting his younger sister due to recent earthquakes is, in fact, false. These kinds of photos portraying helpless people in foreign countries are often created to increase Instagram likes and retweets on twitter. Some times are real photos of someone or something going through tragedy, but often they are not.    

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, 2 June 2015, 14:21

This is a GREAT Tip for checking out all those sad stories you see on Facebook and Twitter.  Once again Thank You Google!!

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Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes

Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The It Was Never a Dress campaign is not only taking social media by storm, it is also changing the way we view the traditional women's bathroom sign. We see that the men's figure wears pants and the women's symbol wears a dress, but what if it was never meant to be a dress in the first place?  Tania Katan launched the popular #ItWasNeverADress campaign at last week's 'Girls in Tech' conference with the idea that the female figure is instead wearing a cape, asserting that women can be superheroes or anything else they choose to be."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These restroom signs are so ubiquitous that we might fail to realize how they are a part of the gendered landscape in which we live.  This takes that well-known icon that was designed to generically represents women and makes us see the sign (and women maybe?) in a new light.  It's delightfully playful and yet powerfully subversive; it challenges us to see beyond what we've been told to see and what society tells us what we should see.  The designers called this "an invitation to shift perceptions and assumptions about women and the audacious, sensitive, and powerful gestures they make every single day."


Questions to Ponder: what other elements of the cultural landscape convey gendered messages? What impact do these message have? 


Tags: perspective, cultural norms, culture, gender, popular culture.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, 21 May 2015, 15:30

I love this! Unit 3: Cultural landscape and norms.

Katie's curator insight, 22 May 2015, 17:19

In this article it suggest that the stereotypical dress for the the women bathroom sign is not a dress, but a cape. This hows that women can be superheroes or whatever they want to be. Still today there is a lack of women in he workforce compared to men. For every 4 men working working for Google there is 1 women and half of them quit because of the poor work environment. I think this helps represent that women are capable of anything. This is an example of women in the workforce and gender equity.  

Seth Forman's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 02:08

Summary: This article basically explains the story of the recently emerged #ItWasNeverADress campaign. This is a pretty cool article because I never really payed attention to how even a restroom sign could be considered gender inequality. 

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 6 because gender inequality is an important measure of development.

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Nat Geo Kids on YouTube

Nat Geo Kids on YouTube | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Did you know 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute? That's a lot of video to sort through! Luckily, National Geographic Kids has done the work for you. We're bringing you the best videos the Internet has to offer! 

 

National Geographic Kids playlists are an exciting way to 

discover the very best of YouTube. Hosted by kids for kids, we've created amazing playlists on awesome animals, cool science, funny pets, and more. With a new playlist added regularly, we're the best destination for curious kids like you to explore, laugh, and learn. So pick a topic you love and start watching today!"


Tags: National Geographic, K12, biogeography.

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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, 21 March 2015, 21:29

Nat Geo For Kids

Dr. Faith Morrison Alexander's curator insight, 23 March 2015, 09:47

This is fantastic!  For our visual learners, this technology can easily be embedded into daily instruction.