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South Africa is the world's most unequal nation

South Africa is the world's most unequal nation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Despite 25 years of democracy, South Africa remains the most economically unequal country in the world, according to the World Bank. If anything, South Africa is even more divided now than it was in 1994 as the legacy of apartheid endures. Previously disadvantaged South Africans hold fewer assets, have fewer skills, earn lower wages, and are still more likely to be unemployed, a 2018 World Bank report on poverty and inequality in South Africa found."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This CNN article takes a shocked tone, but that removes South Africa from it's historical and geographic context even if the outcome is unfortunate (as a bonus for educators, the article has a GINI reference in its analysis with the data charts).  Time's cover story is more detailed and nuanced. In the late 1980s, the apartheid system was becoming untenable; the injustices and discontent make the apartheid government unable to govern.  Both the government and activists recognized that change was necessary and compromises were needed to allow South Africa to move from the apartheid system of racial separation to nonracial democracy without falling apart.

The post-apartheid government guaranteed that while political power would be transferred, economic power would still stay ensconced in the hands of the land-owning elites, since there was to be no massive land redistribution. Neighboring Zimbabwe had disastrous land redistribution attempts and everyone wants to avoid economic chaos.  Land reform will be be a key issue in tomorrow's election (see this BBC article for more election issues).     

 

GeoEd Tags: South Africa, Africa, race, ethnicity, political, economic.

Scoop.it Tags: South Africa, Africarace, ethnicitypolitical, economic

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 10, 5:45 AM
Development
Owenchung's comment, May 13, 11:39 PM
OH,I SEE
Renee's curator insight, May 14, 5:41 AM
This article is a good resource that may be used for a case study in our unit because it highlights inequalities and issues affecting the development of South Africa and the impact it has on human wellbeing. Additionally, there are several useful data charts taken from credible sources. 
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Map: Where Are Confederate-Named Schools?

Map: Where Are Confederate-Named Schools? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Most schools with names tied to the Confederacy are in the South, were built or named after 1950, and have a student body that is majority non-white.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The maps (and the charts) created from this national database is quite revealing.  At least 36 'Confederate-themed' schools have changed their names since 2015 and I suspect that number will continue to grow in the coming years.    

 

Tags: race, racism, landscape, historicalthe South.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, May 28, 2018 12:04 PM
Great example of graphics and visualization via various online tools.
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National Geographic Reckons With Its Past: 'For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist'

National Geographic Reckons With Its Past: 'For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Before it could publish an issue on race, the magazine first had to look at its own history. 'Some of what you find in our archives leaves you speechless,' writes editor Susan Goldberg.  The 1916 caption of the picture of these aboriginal Australians described them as 'savages who rank lowest in intelligence of all human beings.'"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is both incredibly obvious, and remarkably shocking.  I don't think that any academic geographic should be surprised that for generations, National Geographic's goals to describe the world's people and it mission to sell magazines made its coverage a product of the cultural norms of the times, the magazine producers and subscribers.  Still, this open honesty coming from National Geographic about National Geographic's past is a breath of fresh air that is quite encouraging, even if some still think that National Geographic's issue and cover miss the mark.

 

Questions to Ponder: Are there some voyeuristic tendencies we might exhibit as well learn about, or discuss other cultures?  How do we highlight culture differences without making making those with different cultural practices seem as innately 'other' or 'less than?'    

 

Tags: National Geographic, race, racismmedia

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Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments

Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The protests in Charlottesville, VA in August 2017 were all about Confederate statues, and they were never about monuments all at the same time.  This video from HBO’s Vice news has some f-bombs, but frankly, that isn’t the most disturbing content of this unflinching look into the Alt-Right/White nationalist protests and the subsequent counter-protests.  Despite the graphic display of violence, overt racism, and coarse language, I find the video incredibly illuminating and insightful.  It is hard to sanitize and sugar-coat the facts and still give an accurate portrayal of these events.

As I said, it’s about the statues, but not truly.  At stake is the control over public space and the normative messages within the cultural landscape.  Who decides what history gets etched into our public squares?  What are the meanings within this landscape?  Even 20 years ago, the thought of marshalling political power in Southern cities and states to remove Confederate statues was unthinkable what these symbols meant is different then what they were mean today.  Modern southern politicians are seeing that supporting them vigorously is the new lost cause. Could we have a cultural landscape that has no public memorials to the Confederacy in 25 years?  What would that say about the society that restructured the landscape?  The cultural landscape isn’t just a reflection of society; it also shows political, ethnic, cultural and economic struggles to as “who were are” and what our communal values are continually get remade.

The symbols of the Confederacy have long been venerated by some as symbols of southern heritage, but implicitly a white heritage.  Today, many are seeking to create public spaces that foster an sense of inclusion of African Americans into that definition of “who we are” in the public places.  In May 2017, New Orleans removed some of their Confederate statues, and Mayor Mitch Landrieu gave a powerful speech that contextualizes (one perspective on the) historical meanings embedded in these statues.  I find his perspective to be the most appropriate for a South that respects all of its citizens and honors its past.

FURTHER READING:  Geographer Jonathan Leib gives a fantastic analysis of the competing politics of the juxtaposition of Confederate statues and Arthur Ashe in Richmond, VA.  Some geographers (Derek Alderman and Joshua Inwood) in an op-ed argue that this is the time for the Trump administration to explicitly repudiate white nationalism.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I added some links to this old article to include a fifth example, that of Charlottesville, VA. 

 

Tags: monuments, architecturerace, racism, landscape.

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Matthew Austin's curator insight, September 18, 2017 1:03 AM
This article talks about the cultural significance behind certain monuments, among those being the Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, VA. It provides an interesting context for discussion of the alt right.
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Gullah Culture

"While Gullah was not originally a written language and has never had a governing authority or dictionary, linguistic scholars have found that the language is internally consistent and in some ways more efficient and expressive than standard English. Elements of the language have seeped into African-American Vernacular English across the country."

 

For the first time in recent memory, the Charleston County School Board is discussing how to address the specific needs of Gullah and Geechee students, children of a culture whose linguistic origins trace back to the west coast of Africa via the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Some teachers have said the students' way of speaking — whether in the heavily West African-influenced Gullah language or in the more Anglicized dialects sometimes known as Geechee — can present an obstacle to understanding in the classroom. Like many Lowcountry Gullah speakers of her generation, the current head of state for the Gullah/Geechee Nation carries painful memories of adults who taught her to hold her family's way of speaking in contempt.

 

Tags: language, culture, raceeducation, historical.

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, May 31, 2017 10:58 AM
A truly unique gem of American culture, absolutely fascinating.
Mr Mac's curator insight, July 10, 2017 11:26 AM
Unit 3 - Folk Culture, Regions, Language, race/ethnicity
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The history of African-American social dance

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Dance is more than just a way to have fun; dance reflects cultural forms of expression and communal identity.  This Ted-Ed talk demonstrates the rich cultural heritage that can be seen in particular cultural traits (such as food, clothing, dance, music, etc.).  This is bound to be a fun, vibrant way to show the how cultural patterns and processes play out using something that young people generally enjoy. 

 

Tags: culturediffusion, popular culture, music, race, historicalthe South, TED, video.

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The Buried Catchphrase of Classic Hollywood

“The phrase 'Free, white, and 21' appeared in dozens of movies in the ‘30s and ‘40s, a proud assertion that positioned white privilege as the ultimate argument-stopper. It was a catchphrase of the decade, as blandly ubiquitous as any modern meme: a way for white America to check its own privilege and feel exhilarated rather than finding fault.  Read more about the history of the phrase here."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I found this glimpse into the American past as startling, even if it shouldn't be.  It jarred me because today many in America bristle or are startled at the notion that 'white privilege' exists today even if there are countless examples that we do not live in a post-racial society.  This glimpse of old-school Hollywood shows how asserting white privilege was common place in the lexicon--equally fascinating is how we've pretended that it never was.  White privilege is no longer flouted in polite company like it once was, but that doesn't mean that it isn't real.    

 

Tags: racecultural normslanguage, racism, culture, unit 3 culture.

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The forgotten way African Americans stayed safe in a racist America

The forgotten way African Americans stayed safe in a racist America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When racist towns used to lynch people, these guides helped keep black travelers safe
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationraceclassculture, historical, ethnicity.

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Tania Gammage's curator insight, March 17, 2016 6:58 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 19, 2016 8:48 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 2016 1:10 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

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Why don't black and white Americans live together?

Why don't black and white Americans live together? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In many parts of the US, Americans of different races aren't neighbours - they don't go to the same schools, they don't always have access to the same services.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is filled with good geography (and more specifically AP Human Geography) vocabulary.  Redlining, blockbusting, and racial covenants are all discussed as spatial process that have shaped socioeconomic and racial characteristics in American cities. 

 

Tags: neighborhood, urban, socioeconomic, racepoverty, spatialhousing.

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Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides

Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From 1936 to 1966, the 'Green Book' was a travel guide that provided black motorists with peace of mind while they drove through a country where racial segregation was the norm and sundown towns — where African-Americans had to leave after dark — were not uncommon."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it.    


This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme is "Explore! The Power of Maps."  Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.  


Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 12, 2015 8:08 AM

All I have to say is....wow. 

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Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong.

Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
False history marginalizes African Americans and makes us all dumber.


Tags: raceconflict, racism, historical, the Southlandscape, monuments.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Admittedly, I've got a thing for monuments in the cultural landscape.  This is a very nice article for a historical geographer on how memory and heritage are enshrined in the landscape; this process politicizes history in ways that shape the national narrative, and that shapes how we think in past.   Using historical geography to understand the debates in the news?  No way!!  Here James Loewen writes in the Washington Post on the topic for a general audience. 

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LoisCortez's curator insight, July 3, 2015 1:05 AM

well

ed alvarado's comment, July 4, 2015 12:31 AM
Thats amazing
Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 5, 2015 6:22 PM

Admittedly, I've got a thing for monuments in the cultural landscape.  This is a very nice article for a historical geographer on how memory and heritage are enshrined in the landscape; this process politicizes history in ways that shape the national narrative, and that shapes how we think in past.   Using historical geography to understand the debates in the news?  No way!!  Here James Loewen writes in the Washington Post on the topic for a general audience. 

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Language in the Media

"Ever notice how the media treats black protesters & white rioters differently?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some food for thought on how language in the media frames the narratives that most people receive.  Do you feel that the media treats all people and all groups fairly?  Can you think of some examples to make your case?  Can the media be free from all bias?

 

Tags: Languagemedia, race, class, culture.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 24, 2015 12:03 AM

The Eternal Subtext.

Thomas Johnson's curator insight, November 29, 2015 4:31 PM

The anchors are noticeably racist towards blacks.

Harsher language is used when referring to blacks.

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Why Rachel Dolezal Has Us Talking About Race

"Everyone and their mom has an opinion about former NAACP chapter president Rachel Dolezal. We break down the arguments for you."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Her individual story might not warrant the attention it is getting, but it is challenging many people's very notion of race and other categories (or axes) of identity--and that is worth discussing.


Tags: culturerace.

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Why does the misperception that slavery only happened in the southern United States exist?

"Christy Clark-Pujara research focuses on the experiences of black people in British and French North America in the seventeenth, eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. She examines how the business of slavery—the buying and selling of people, food, and goods—shaped the experience of slavery, the process of emancipation, and the realities of black freedom in Rhode Island from the colonial period through the American Civil War."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is one of the many videos produced by the Choices Program about slavery in the New England (especially Rhode Island).  Featured in the videos is Dr. Christy Clark-Pujara, who wrote "Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island."  There is a reason to what we learn in history, and there are also reasons to the histories that are rarely told.  More than any other of the original thirteen colonies and states along the Eastern Seaboard, Rhode Island plied the triangle trade transporting more slaves to the Americas than all the other states combined.

 

Some Rhode Island slavery facts:

  • In 1776, Rhode Island had the largest proportion of slave population of any of the New England colonies.
  • During the antebellum period Rhode Islanders were the leading producers of “negro cloth,” a coarse wool-cotton material made especially for enslaved blacks in the American South.
  • More than 60 percent of all the slave ships that left North America left from Rhode Island.

 

Tags: raceRhode Island, slavery, labor, economic, historical.

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Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 29, 2018 7:20 PM
I believe that this is a very important video. I work in a house museum and the people who visit are surprised that not only did the owner of the house own slaves in the north after it was made illegal by the Rhode Island's gradual emancipation act in 1784, but he also continued to deal in slavery by sending ships to Africa. Even after the slave trade became illegal in the North that does not mean that they were not involved indirectly. The textile factories made clothes out of slave-picked cotton, the barrel makers products were used to hold rum and food for trade and the journey to Africa. It definitely needs to be discussed more in the classrooms and even on college campuses. More and more colleges and universities are opening up about their dark histories, but that is a great thing because they are then able to move forward and not ignore the evils in which they were involved. 

Interesting read that discusses institutions and their role in slavery, Craig Steven Wilder- Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities
 
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South Africa Is Still Under Apartheid

"More than two decades after the end of apartheid in South Africa, Cape Town remains racially segregated, with many black residents living in substandard townships."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The title is a bit inflammatory--news agencies may pretend that they aren't in the shock-and-awe, clickbait economy, but they invented the salacious headline to grab our attention.  Still, the racial inequities of a system as pervasive as apartheid aren't going to be reversed in a generation and the racial differences in Capetown are coming under more international scrutiny as the they are in the midst of their current drought.

 

Tags: South Africa, Africarace, ethnicityneighborhood, urban, planning, drought, water, urban ecology.   

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Matt Manish's curator insight, May 2, 2018 11:26 PM
One can see from this video that Apartheid still exists in some parts of South Africa such as Cape Town. From the drone footage in this video, one can see how divided Cape Town's landscape is from a bird's eye view. You can see how the black community lives in the part of town that is made up of mainly shacks. Right next door, you can see that the white community lives in the suburbs with regular housing and lush trees located adjacently to the black community's village of shacks. It's not just the residential areas of Cape Town that is segregated. Even in the heart of the city, a real racial tension between blacks and whites can be sensed,. Resulting in the majority of the black community being less successful than the white community. One can clearly see that even though Apartheid has officially ended, the tension between blacks and whites still exists in this part of South Africa.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 9:34 PM
This video looks into the still segregated town of Cape Town, located in South Africa. Although it was racially segregated by apartheid in the 20th century, Apartheid was outlawed in 1994. Since then, it has been claimed that Cape Town has become more diverse. This is only true to some extent. Because of the apartheid, it was nearly impossible for Blacks and People of Color to get jobs in the city. Therefore, the different races now inhabit their own neighborhoods, however the segregation still lingers. In most white neighborhoods, they enjoy beautiful and safe lifestyles while the poorer neighbors can’t even afford running water or electricity. Tags: South Africa, Africa, race, ethnicity, neighborhood, urban, planning, drought, water, urban ecology.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, November 19, 2018 1:50 PM
South Africa had a long history of issues ranging back to Colonialism, through apartheid, and today with government corruption and internal strife. The great inequality left behind after apartheid is a major issue in the country for many people. One way this has been addressed recently is with land redistribution, but this policy has faced much controversy especially since many have suggested the government being able to confiscate "white owned land"  without compensation and use for redistribution.
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Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy

Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In [recent years], the South’s 150-year reverence for the Confederacy was shaken. Public officials responded to the national mourning and outcry by removing prominent public displays of its most recognizable symbol [the flag]. It became a moment of deep reflection for a region where the Confederate flag is viewed by many white Southerners as an emblem of their heritage and regional pride despite its association with slavery, Jim Crow and the violent resistance to the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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Treathyl Fox's comment, August 17, 2017 10:22 AM
Nobody in Iraq is debating the pulling down of the statue of Saddam Hussein. It's about what his statue "represented" to a people. It's the same thing with the Confederate symbols. America has an “80%” minority population. (The 80% is a joke.) From the Native Americans to anybody else in that percentage, you won't hear any of them arguing to defend the Confederacy as their “history” and “heritage”. Get real!
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:57 PM

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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The dim reality of South Africa's new dawn

In April 1994, South Africa held its first democratic elections and all races went to the polls to bury apartheid for good. But hopes of a new dawn have been tarnished by fraud and corruption at the highest levels.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The first 2 and a half minutes of this video are a good historical analysis into the dismantling of apartheid in South Africa, culminating in the election of Nelson Mandela and the empowerment of the ANC.  Today though, the ANC and South Africa is mired in endemic corruption.  South Africa is one of the most unequal societies with high unemployment and a faltering economy. 

 

Tags: South Africacrime, Africa, political, racegovernance, ethnicity.

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tyrone perry's curator insight, April 5, 2018 2:07 PM
 South Africa went through years of apartheid many fought to end it.  Nelson Mandela’s struggle to bring equality to South Africa almost looks nonexistent with the turn of the ANC.  They once fought for equality and now they are as courrpt as the people they were fighting, All them years.  It’s evident seeing the presidents property and how he lives and seeing how the poor people of South Africa lives.
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Dreadlocks Decision Raises Another Question: What Is Race?

Dreadlocks Decision Raises Another Question: What Is Race? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Many experts agree with an appeals court's decision last month that dreadlocks aren't a common racial characteristic. But left undecided: What's a common racial characteristic?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Race is both an omnipresent part of culture and surprisingly elusive.  "What is race?" might seem like an obvious question with concrete answers, but many see race as a socially constructed concept.  Even if it is socially constructed, how it is thought of has legal ramifications (as shown in the case regarding dreadlocks).  This is a good article that could start students asking the question "What is race?" and realize that it might be a hard question to answer.  

 

Tags: culture, race.

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Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 31, 2016 8:27 PM

Race is both an omnipresent part of culture and surprisingly elusive.  "What is race?" might seem like an obvious question with concrete answers, but many see race as a socially constructed concept.  Even if it is socially constructed, how it is thought of has legal ramifications (as shown in the case regarding dreadlocks).  This is a good article that could start students asking the question "What is race?" and realize that it might be a hard question to answer.  

 

Tags: culture, race.

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Aerial Photos Show how Apartheid Still Shapes South African Cities

Aerial Photos Show how Apartheid Still Shapes South African Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An American used drones to capture the color lines still stark in South African cities.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In some respects this isn't surprising, but it is still striking to see how stark the differences are.  One generation of political change does not reverse generations of systemic racism that have had economic, cultural, and political impacts.  Many of the urban planning decisions were based on apartheid, and that historical legacy is still embedded landscape.

 

Tags: South Africa, images, Africarace, ethnicityneighborhood, urban, planning, images, remote sensing.

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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 9, 2018 10:13 AM
"I agree with you, I think that the images are chilling. And they communicate so well what is otherwise a very complicated and nuanced issue to discuss—separation, segregation, history, disenfranchisement. But the images cut right to the heart of the matter, which is that these separations are not right" This is a quote in the article from the man that took the pictures (Johnny Miller). These photos show us the lines of segregation that continues even in a post Apartheid South Africa. These are amazing images and really quite unbelievable. We think of different segregation here in America, but what these photos show are unlike anything that I have personally seen.  As stated in the article the author hopes to create conversations about these separations. We see planned spatial separations that we created by city planners and we must used these as lessons going forward and as jumping off points to discuss. These shocking images can help inform us as a society that we must improve our social issues and if we don't we will continue to see issues like this grow both here in South Africa and around the world. One can see while tensions would be so high as a clear divide in living standards can rightfully cause anger. Eventually this anger leads to hate and this hate leads to an up rise in the people. 
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 31, 2018 4:23 PM
South Africa is one of the few countries that has a similar history in regards to racial segregation as America.  What makes their case unique is that the African population was there first and the English came in and created a system in which they were superior.  Although they have been officially desegregated for almost 20 years, these photos show that there are still underlying issues that exist.  These photos reveal that on one side of a particular area, the homes look like a typical suburban area where right across from that there are areas that resemble slums.  The areas that are more developed and wealthy have a majority white population and the poorer, less developed areas have large black populations.  The affects of segregation are long lasting and not solved overnight.  Just because government policies say that discrimination on a racial basis is illegal, doesn’t mean that society will neatly reorganize itself.  I think that the craziest part of this for me was that even the landscaping is vastly different despite the closeness of the two areas.  The wealthier part has lush green and the poorer parts have dirt and sand.  This an example of physical geography providing evidence for a societal separation.
David Stiger's curator insight, November 10, 2018 6:22 PM
Just because a formal social construct - an idea in the human mind - changes, does not mean that change, or desire to alter course, is reflected in the real world. While the idea of apartheid in South Africa came to an end, the real world in the form of urban geography has yet to catch up. The urban planning under apartheid still carries the legacy of color codes and demarcated boundaries between "races" in order to cement socioeconomic inequity. This situation in South Africa is similar to the United States after the Civil Rights movement ended the era of Jim Crow. Even though laws were passed, the geography remained largely untouched. Black neighborhoods remained socially and economically segregated - the only difference being that the law did not mandate this. The law never stipulated geographic changes or economic prescriptions like wealth redistribution. It turns out that human geography and philosophical principles can be at odds with each other, as demonstrated by the aerial photographs of South African cities. 
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I Have Been to the Mountaintop

Audio http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkivebeentothemountaintop.htm
Seth Dixon's insight:

On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.   Shared above is his last speech given the day before he died in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

Tags: historical, race, poverty

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 4, 2016 8:59 PM

On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.   Shared above is his last speech given the day before he died in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

Tags: historical, race, poverty. 

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:31 AM

On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.   Shared above is his last speech given the day before he died in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

Tags: historical, race, poverty. 

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Why America Needs a Slavery Museum

"The Whitney Plantation near Wallace, Louisiana, is the first and only U.S. museum and memorial to slavery. While other museums may include slavery in their exhibits, the Whitney Plantation is the first of its kind to focus primarily on the institution. John Cummings, a 78-year-old white southerner, has spent 16 years and more than $8 million of his own fortune to build the project, which opened in December of last year.

Cummings, a successful trial attorney, developed the museum with the help of his full-time director of research, Ibrahima Seck. The duo hope to educate people on the realities of slavery in its time and its impact in the United States today. 'The history of this country is rooted in slavery,' says Seck. 'If you don’t understand the source of the problem, how can you solve it?'"

 

Tags: raceconflictracism, historicalthe Southlandscape.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 2016 10:25 AM

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

Aris Pastidis's curator insight, March 11, 2016 1:24 AM

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

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How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow

How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A postal worker created a guide for black travelers that was published almost every year from 1936 to 1966."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it (podcast on the Green Book and an additional article).     

Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationrace, classculture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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Is Cultural Appropriation Always Wrong?

Is Cultural Appropriation Always Wrong? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

We sometimes describe this mingling as 'cross-pollination’ or ‘cross-fertilization’ — benign, bucolic metaphors that obscure the force of these encounters. When we wish to speak more plainly, we talk of ‘appropriation’ — a word now associated with the white Western world’s co-opting of minority cultures.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The distinction between cultural diffusion and cultural appropriation can get very blurry, and I doubt that there is a ‘final word’ on the topic.  What is perceived as culturally inappropriate or exploitative is not clear cut.  In addition to this NY Times article about the concept of cultural appropriation, below are a few articles that can be used to discuss this idea.  These topics are by nature controversial, and you can use your discretion to know which articles are appropriate for your students given their maturity level.  I don’t agree with all the authors of these articles; I also don’t think these issues are perfect examples of cultural appropriation, but that is why they are helpful for a discussion. 


Questions to Ponder: What pushes something from cultural diffusion to cultural appropriation?  What makes these examples inappropriate or okay in your estimation? When do you feel cultural commodification is 'crossing the line' or is everything marketable fair game?  What are other examples of cultural appropriation that you can think of? 


Tagsculture, popular culturefolk cultureseconomic, unit 3 culture.

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asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:39 AM

How about "cross-polination" and "cross-fertilization" in cultures?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 22, 2015 10:32 AM

unit 3

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:59 AM

Unit 3

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The Idea of Race

You may know exactly what race you are, but how would you prove it if somebody disagreed with you? Jenée Desmond Harris explains. And for more on how race is a social construct:
http://www.vox.com/2014/10/10/6943461...


Tags: culturerace.

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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 27, 2015 9:10 AM

Thomas Masaryk, político y humanista checo, llegó a Estados Unidos y se encontró con el cuestionario que preguntaba entre otras cosas a qué raza pertenecía el inmigrante. Tras pensarlo un rato, escribió: La Humana.

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:23 PM

I am always trying to explain to my students that race is a social construct-hopefully this video will help them to understand this concept.

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Why South Carolina’s Confederate flag isn’t at half-staff after church shooting

Why South Carolina’s Confederate flag isn’t at half-staff after church shooting | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The battle over a fraught symbol is resurrected.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The AME church in Charleston S.C. was targeted in a racist-motivated terrorist attack this week.  Many racial issues have come to the fore in the wake of this attack.  Two flags were lowered more than 100 miles away in Columbia, the state’s capital, the one's picture above flying on the dome of the state house.  Whether South Carolina politicians want to or not, the issue of the Confederate Battle Flag has resurfaced because as a sanctioned part of the cultural landscape, it's symbolism is continually called into question.

 

Tags: raceconflict, racism, historical, the Southlandscape.

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, June 22, 2015 9:11 AM

The politics of the flag...amazing

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, June 22, 2015 11:10 AM

Another interesting post by Seth Dixon