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How to Recapture the Muslim World’s Lost Hope

How to Recapture the Muslim World’s Lost Hope | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What happened to us? The question haunts us in the Arab and Muslim world. We repeat it like a mantra. You will hear it from Iran to Syria, from Saudi Arabia to Pakistan, and in my own country, Lebanon. For us, the past is a different country, one not mired in the horrors of sectarian killings. It is a more vibrant place, without the crushing intolerance of religious zealots and seemingly endless, amorphous wars.
Seth Dixon's insight:
This opinion piece is a somewhat controversial, but that is part of its value. The core of the author’s thesis is that to understand the modern Middle East, especially if one is searching for a way to create a more democratic Middle East, we must look to the past to see how we got there. 1979 is seen here as the pivotal year that changed the trajectory of the Middle East, in large part because of the Islamic Revolution in Iran, but for many other region-wide changes. Questions to Ponder: What were the big shifts that occurred in 1979? What are things that you think that the author gets correct about their historical analysis of the Middle East? What are some positions where you disagree with the author?

Read with links here: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2TM
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Economies of South America

World Economic Outlook, April 2019 - http://bit.ly/2vAxtak
Seth Dixon's insight:
There are many stories in this video in the nearly 40 years of economic history of South America since 1990.The two most important stories portrayed (or at least the most dramatic) in the animated chart are decline of Venezuela’s economy and the rise of Chile’s. This video can act as a primer to get students to consider the regional context of economic growth as well as the differing historical, political, and geographic context that leads to distinct results in any given country. See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Qa


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The Xinjiang Conflict: Uyghur Identity, Language Policy, and Political Discourse

The Xinjiang Conflict: Uyghur Identity, Language Policy, and Political Discourse | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This study explores Chinese language policy and language use in Inner Asia, as well as the relation of language policy to the politics of Uyghur identity. Language is central to ethnic identity, and official language policies are often overlooked as critical factors in conflict over ethnic nationalism.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A while back I wrote this blogpost for the National Geographic Education Blog about the Uyghur people of Eastern Turkestan.  The cultural policies of assimilation that are working to erase Eastern Turkestan and more fully make it Xinjiang are politically powerful, but the situation is more pressing that most people today realize. This academic article, The Xinjiang Conflict: Uyghur Identity, Language Policy, and Political Discourse, is an excellent primer to the cultural and political complexities of this place with two names where East Asia and Central Asia meet. 

 

GeoEd Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia, religion, culture, Islam, landscape.

Scoop.it Tags: political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religion, culture, Islam, landscape.

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India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased

India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A generation ago, long before Modi (and the BJP) was in power, right-wing Hindu nationalist leaders in Maharashtra state renamed Bombay as Mumbai — a nod to the city's patron goddess Mumbadevi. Other cities followed: Madras became Chennai; Calcutta, Kolkata; Bangalore, Bengaluru. All the changes were a rejection of Anglicized names that came into use during British colonial rule. In the most recent wave of name changes, it's not about erasing colonial monikers. It's about erasing Muslim ones."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Indian officials have been altering toponyms to be more Hinducentric; this is a results of growing Hindu nationalism as an important element of modern Indian politics.  In another thematically similar, but regionally distinct example, we can see how place names matter in American cities.  When large corporations (like Google or Amazon) move in to a city,  the corporations might try to rename the neighborhoods and, in a sense, rebrand the place.    

Both examples show that the cultural landscape, including the names on them, are not just a passive reflection of the cultures that have shaped these places; they manifest the power dynamics of competing cultural groups seeking to assert their vision of place and culture to be physically manifested in public spaces. 

 

GeoEd Tags: culture, political, place, toponymsIndia, South Asia, Hinduism, historical.

Scoop.it Tagsculturepolitical, placetoponymsIndia, South Asia, Hinduism, historical.

 

gara gewiki's comment, May 2, 2019 2:12 AM
good
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Delhi riots: City tense after Hindu-Muslim clashes leave 23 dead

Delhi riots: City tense after Hindu-Muslim clashes leave 23 dead | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The deadliest violence in India's capital for decades leaves 23 people dead and scores injured.
Seth Dixon's insight:
It is so disheartening to see the news that India is undergoing a wave of religious unrest. As citizen and immigration laws have been enacted that have a religious component to it, many feel that this is unfairly targeting Muslim migrants and refugees. Some see this as the beginning of a delegitimization of Muslim citizenship within India. As people are protesting these laws, there are groups that are also a violently clashing with protesters in the streets. Some are targeting Mosques, and the police have been unable to keep the peace. This is some nasty business that I hate to see anywhere, but if you need an example of how religion can be a centrifugal force in a country, this is a perfect example.  See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2S4
Bruno BK Kesangana's curator insight, March 22, 1:47 PM
article à lire absolument
Bruno BK Kesangana's curator insight, March 22, 2:55 PM
a lire absolument
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The Documentary Podcast, Balkan Border Wars - Serbia and Kosovo

The Documentary Podcast, Balkan Border Wars - Serbia and Kosovo | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Old enemies Serbia and Kosovo discuss what for some is unthinkable - an ethnic land swap
Seth Dixon's insight:

Land swaps are about fixing problematic borders–and we know that the world is full of problematic, contentious, and disputed borders.  Yet land swap are incredibly rare because it upends the status quo.  A few years back Belgium and Netherlands swapped some land, but more often then not, calls to simply give land to another country just because the land appears to be controlled by the ‘wrong’ country usually go unanswered.  This proposed swap is especially intriguing because (to an objective outside observer) it could benefit both countries and lead to a mutual recognition of their shared border.  Some argue that working this type of border/land-swap is not to different from the ethnic cleansing of yesteryear and won't lead to greater peace and regional cooperation. This series of maps highlights the ethnic, political, and geographic ramifications. 

 

GeoEd Tags: borders, political, territoriality, unit 4 political, Serbia, Kosovo, Europe.

Scoop.it Tags: borders, political, territoriality, unit 4 political, Serbia, Kosovo, Europe.

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South Africa is the world's most unequal nation

South Africa is the world's most unequal nation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Despite 25 years of democracy, South Africa remains the most economically unequal country in the world, according to the World Bank. If anything, South Africa is even more divided now than it was in 1994 as the legacy of apartheid endures. Previously disadvantaged South Africans hold fewer assets, have fewer skills, earn lower wages, and are still more likely to be unemployed, a 2018 World Bank report on poverty and inequality in South Africa found."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This CNN article takes a shocked tone, but that removes South Africa from it's historical and geographic context even if the outcome is unfortunate (as a bonus for educators, the article has a GINI reference in its analysis with the data charts).  Time's cover story is more detailed and nuanced. In the late 1980s, the apartheid system was becoming untenable; the injustices and discontent make the apartheid government unable to govern.  Both the government and activists recognized that change was necessary and compromises were needed to allow South Africa to move from the apartheid system of racial separation to nonracial democracy without falling apart.

The post-apartheid government guaranteed that while political power would be transferred, economic power would still stay ensconced in the hands of the land-owning elites, since there was to be no massive land redistribution. Neighboring Zimbabwe had disastrous land redistribution attempts and everyone wants to avoid economic chaos.  Land reform will be be a key issue in tomorrow's election (see this BBC article for more election issues).     

 

GeoEd Tags: South Africa, Africa, race, ethnicity, political, economic.

Scoop.it Tags: South Africa, Africarace, ethnicitypolitical, economic

GTANSW & ACT's curator insight, May 10, 2019 5:45 AM
Development
Owenchung's comment, May 13, 2019 11:39 PM
OH,I SEE
Renee's curator insight, May 14, 2019 5:41 AM
This article is a good resource that may be used for a case study in our unit because it highlights inequalities and issues affecting the development of South Africa and the impact it has on human wellbeing. Additionally, there are several useful data charts taken from credible sources.