Geography Education
2.0M views | +284 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The changing face of Japan: labour shortage opens doors to immigrant workers

The changing face of Japan: labour shortage opens doors to immigrant workers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Japan – once one of the world’s most homogenous societies – is starting to unwind its traditional opposition to large-scale immigration
Seth Dixon's insight:

Japan is one of the closest examples of a nation-state.  And like Iceland, that is in part because the ocean historically has acted as a massive barrier to cultural diffusion and migration. Today though, modern transportation makes that barrier negligible.  Cultural attitudes have continued to not favor international immigration but their declining population has forced a change towards the end of 2018 (see any of theses five articles from Washington Post, Japanese Times, Nippon.com, the Guardian, and the Diplomat).

Japan has traditionally been one on the countries most opposed to allowing large number of migrants into their country.  The administration is still presenting themselves as tough on immigration; the 2018 policy change will allow semi-skilled workers to enter Japan for 5 years, but they cannot bring their family members with them, and they still must pass a Japanese-language exam.  These shifts are not an abandonment of policies that seek to preserve cultural homogeneity, but they are also an acknowledgement of the demographic realities and struggles of a declining population.     

Until 2018, Japanese policy only highly-skilled migrants were allowed in to Japan, with advantages given to those with Japanese ancestry.  However, these stringent migration policies coupled with Japan’s declining birth rates meant that Japan’s population was declining substantially enough to negatively impact their economy.  There were foreign workers filling in the gaps, but only 20% of those workers had functioning work visas under the old prohibitive system. This new policy is primarily aimed at replacing workers in sectors that are facing severe labor shortages, that are being classified as “semi-skilled workers.”  The law is trying to walk a fine line, trying to bring in more workers to Japan while simultaneously making it very difficult still trying to make it very tough for these workers to settle permanently in Japan. This will have a significant impact on Japanese society, and in the near future, it’s cultural institutions.   

 

GeoEd Tags: Japan, East Asia, declining population, migration.

more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Geographic analysis for the zombie apocalypse

Can geography save your life in case of, say, a zombie apocalypse? Understanding the push and pull factors that create geographic movement -- or how people, resources, and even ideas travel -- might help you determine the location that's best for survival. David Hunter playfully analyzes the geography skills that you'd need to escape the zombies.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This tongue -in-cheek TED-ED lesson shows how the concepts of movement are spatial, and of course, critical in an zombie apocalypse.  Good vocabulary (push factors, pull factors, migration, infrastructure, etc.) is used in this clip.  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, TED, video.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Left For Dead: Myanmar’s Muslim Minority

In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country's western state of Rakhine. The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps; Human Rights Watch deemed the attacks crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region's intricate and brutal human trafficking network.

 

Tags: Rohingyagenocide, migration, politicalconflict, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

more...
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 2018 8:14 AM
This kind of ethnic conflict within a country is, in part, a result of colonial borders ignoring ethnic boundaries. The Rohingya are a Muslim minority in a Buddhist majority country, and they are extremely vulnerable to the ethnic cleansing currently happening. The systemic destruction of villages, massacres, and gang rapes by Buddhist vigilantes and Myanmar's military is nothing short of genocide, wiping out the Rohingya by killing them or forcing them to flee the country.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Somalia: The Forgotten Story

Part I: The story of Somalia's decline from stability to chaos and the problems facing its people at home and abroad.

Part II: The ongoing civil war has caused serious damage to Somalia's infrastructure and economy. Thousands of Somalis have either left as economic migrants or fled as refugees. Within Somali, more than a million people are internally displaced.

 

Tags: devolutionpolitical, states, unit 4 politicalmigrationrefugees, Somalia, Africa.

more...
David Stiger's curator insight, November 10, 2018 10:50 PM
Somali's unique geographic position, an intersection of Africa and Asia, designated it as a prime target of European colonialism during the 19th century. By controlling the Horn of Africa, European powers (the Italians, English, and French) could control the flow of spices, natural resources, and trade between Africa and Asia. The colonial order is what initially set up Somalia to fail in the long-run. The European powers carved up the land, giving Somalia culturally and ethnically inaccurate and illogical borders - convenient artificial borders that divided the tribes. When Somalia was finally granted its independence in 1960, Europe left the fledgling nation with problematic borders. After political turmoil in the form of an assassination and a military coup in 1969, the general Siad Barre ruled through dictatorship for 20 years. Desiring to correct historical injustices, Barre invaded Ethiopia in 1977 to reclaim the rightful area of Somalia. Barre's army defeated, the country lost its sense of nationalism leading to a rise in tribal factions and warlords. The country spiraled into civil war and the national government collapsed in 1991. Since then, portions of the country have been stuck in a constant state of civil war and turmoil, while other parts of the country are doing well. What is so tragic is that this all goes back to the poorly drawn borders of European colonialism. 

Neo-colonialism, primarily in the form of third party exploitation, now wreaks havoc on Somalia's economy. European, Indian, and Chinese fishing ships have been illegally fishing in Somalia's waters (another geographic asset) prompting young men to raid and attack the foreign vessels. The original goal of the "pirates" was to scare off and drive away the foreign fishing boats which had taken over the waters. The foreigners merely paid off the young Somalis who boarded their ships. In a country with limited economic opportunity, this inspired young men to raid with the hope of being paid off. The news media made it seem like these "pirates" were simply lazy and went out of their way to raid innocent foreign vessels. There was little blame attributed to the illegal foreign activities. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

With only one left, iconic yellow road sign showing running immigrants now borders on the extinct

With only one left, iconic yellow road sign showing running immigrants now borders on the extinct | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Only one of the 10 iconic Caltrans caution signs emblazoned with the image of an immigrant father, mother and daughter running for their lives remains. They once dotted Interstate 5.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As a child of the border (I grew up 8 miles from the U.S.-Mexican border with family on both sides of the line), the cultural, political and economic impacts of this line were very tangible in my life, but to mention family.  This sign was a symbol of mass migration and cultural change in Southern California and I would pass one on the way to my grandmother’s house.  As a fixture of the cultural landscape, it also became a visual talking point that served as a lightning rod in the political landscape.  During the 80’s and 90’s, immigrants from Mexico were coming in to the United States is large numbers, but since the 2000, that dominant stream has dried up, rendering this sign no longer necessary near freeways crossings.  Mexican migration to and from the United States is a contentious topic where political ideology can be louder than the actual statistics.  Since 2009, more Mexicans have been leaving the United States than entering it (PEW Research Center).  Economic and demographic shifts in both countries have led to this reversal.    

 

Tags: Mexico, migration, political, landscape, California, borders.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

My Family’s Slave

My Family’s Slave | Geography Education | Scoop.it
She lived with us for 56 years. She raised me and my siblings without pay. I was 11, a typical American kid, before I realized who she was.

 

The Spanish Crown eventually began phasing out slavery at home and in its colonies, but parts of the Philippines were so far-flung that authorities couldn’t keep a close eye. Traditions persisted under different guises, even after the U.S. took control of the islands in 1898. Today even the poor can have utusans or katulongs (“helpers”) or kasambahays (“domestics”), as long as there are people even poorer. The pool is deep.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article created a huge stir from the moment it was published, especially within the U.S. Filipino community.  Slavery is reprehensible, but to most people today, it is incomprehensible to imagine how one human could ever enslave another.  This story of a Filipino family that brought a ‘domestic worker’ with them to the United States is a riveting tale that offers glimpses into the cultural context of modern-day slavery.  The author was born into this family and it’s a painful tale intermingled with agony, love, cruelty, tenderness, guilt, and growth.  This article is a long read, but well worth it.  You can listen to a 55-minute audio version of the article, or also listen to the NPR 5-minute version.    

 

Tags: migrationlaborPhilippines, culture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Short Film: How Water Gets From The Nile To Thirsty Refugees

Short Film: How Water Gets From The Nile To Thirsty Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hundreds of thousands of refugees have fled the civil war in South Sudan and resettled in Uganda. This 12-minute documentary shows the daily struggle to get water.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Next to nothing in this video will make you happy about the way things operate for refugees in Northern Uganda who have fled from South Sudan.  We all know the about the dire conditions that refugees face, but knowing about the specifics, and hearing stories from the refugees about their lives and living conditions is powerful.  A huge influx of refugees can tax local resources, especially water.  Food can be shipped in, but water a much more locally variable resource.   The UN refugee camps recommend at least 15 liters of water per person be made available each day, but often it is more like 4-8 liters in these camps.  Dedicated wells (or boreholes) are more effective, but costly.  Trucking in water from the Nile River is the preferred method to simply keep these drowning people’s heads above water.    

Questions to Ponder: Consider how much water you drink, use for cooking, bathing, etc. per day in your household.  How difficult would it be to live on 4 liters of water a day?  What about your lifestyle would be changed? 

 

Tags: Africa, development, Uganda, migrationrefugees, environment, water, sustainability, resources.

more...
Kimmy Jay's curator insight, May 10, 2017 8:51 PM
This would be good to show during 6th grade lesson on refugees 

Matt Richardson's curator insight, May 10, 2017 11:43 PM
The multiple catastrophes occurring in Central Africa at the moment are among the worst in recorded history. These traumatized people need to be heard, understood, and helped. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Growth of Colonial Settlement

Growth of Colonial Settlement | Geography Education | Scoop.it

European settlement began in the region around Chesapeake Bay and in the Northeast, then spread south and west into the Appalachian Mountains.

 

Questions to Ponder: How did European immigrants settle along the East Coast? How did geography determine settlement patterns? 

 

Tagsmigrationmap, historicalcolonialism, USA, National Geographic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Why Did Americans Stop Moving?

Why Did Americans Stop Moving? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Census reports that a record-low share of Americans are moving. A recent paper suggests government policies might be curbing mobility.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, when I've taught world regional geography, I've often discussed a major regional characteristic of North America is the high degree of internal mobility...that appears to be changing and it brings up more questions than answers.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Are there regions in the United States where people are less likely to move?  How does mobility impact economic, cultural, and political patterns in the United States? Why are less people moving now than before?  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, USA, statistics.

more...
Maria Isabel Bryant's curator insight, February 23, 2017 2:19 AM
On residential patterns....
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Minnesota becomes a gateway to Canada for rejected African migrants

More than 430 African migrants have arrived in Winnipeg since April, up from 70 three years ago. Most come by way of Minneapolis, sometimes after grueling treks across Latin America and stints in U.S. immigration detention.

 

A tangle of factors is fueling the surge: brisker traffic along an immigrant smuggling route out of East Africa, stepped-up deportations under the Obama administration and the lure of Canada’s gentler welcome. Advocates expect the Trump administration’s harder line on immigration will spur even more illegal crossings into Canada, where some nonprofits serving asylum seekers are already overwhelmed. Now Canadians worry smugglers are making fresh profits from asylum seekers and migrants take more risks to make the crossing.

 

Tags: migration, USACanada, borders, political.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The silent minority

The silent minority | Geography Education | Scoop.it
America’s largest ethnic group has assimilated so well that people barely notice it

 

German-Americans are America’s largest single ethnic group (if you divide Hispanics into Mexican-Americans, Cuban-Americans, etc). Yet despite their numbers, they are barely visible. During the first world war, parts of America grew hysterically anti-German. Many stopped speaking German and anglicized their names. The second world war saw less anti-German hysteria, but Hitler and the Holocaust gave German-Americans more reasons to hide their origins.

 

Tagsculturemigrationhistorical, ethnicityUSA.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families

Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Born in Japan, Gursewak Singh considers himself Japanese. The government doesn't. But it offers children like him a chance to stay - if their parents leave.

 

Gursewak’s parents, who are Sikhs, fled to Japan from India in the 1990s. For several years, they lived without visas under the radar of the authorities until they were put on a status known as “provisional release” in 2001. It means they can stay in Japan as long as their asylum application is under review.  While there were almost 14,000 asylum cases under review at the end of 2015, Japan accepted only 27 refugees last year. The year before that, the number was 11.

The low acceptance rate stands in stark contrast to Europe, which has seen hundreds of thousands of refugees arrive from countries such as Iraq, Syria and Eritrea. In the first half of the year, European countries ruled on 495,000 asylum applications, approving more than 293,000.

 

Tags: culture, Sikhdeclining populationpopulationmigrationrefugees, JapanEast Asia,             .

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Welcome to Monowi, Nebraska: population 1

Welcome to Monowi, Nebraska: population 1 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Eighty-four-year-old Elsie Eiler pays taxes to herself, grants her own alcohol licence and is the only remaining resident in Monowi, Nebraska.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is it like living in a town with a population of 1?  Would you stay as the last remnant of your withering town? This case study is absolutely fascinating since it defies what we consider the minimum threshold of what is required for a city or a town.  However, the other compelling geographic story is how a once, low-order central place in rural Nebraska, has been (almost) completely abandoned.  

 

Tag: rural, migration, USA.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Divided island: How Haiti and the DR became two worlds

Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a border, and an island. But the two countries are very different today: the Dominican Republic enjoys higher quality of life for many factors than Haiti. I went to this island and visited both countries, to try and understand when and how their paths diverged.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is an exciting debut for the new series "Vox borders."  By just about every development metric available, the Dominican Republic is doing better than Haiti, the only bordering country on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola with the DR.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How does the border impact both countries?  How has sharing one island with different colonial legacies shaped migrational push and pull factors?

 

Tags: Haiti, Dominican Republic, video, poverty, development, economic, labor, migration, political, borders.

more...
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 14, 2018 1:41 AM
This video is extremely interesting seeing as it points out the differences between two very different worlds that are only separated by a single border. The video shows how racist the Dominicans are to their neighbors and shows us how the Haitians live under such scrutiny. On each end of the border, there are two markets that are supposed to allow both the Haitians and the Dominicans to trade their goods, however, the strict border patrol officers keep the Haitians from entering until their neighbors have set up their shops at the best spots. The director of the video also notes that he believes the reason Haiti is much poorer than the Dominican Republic stems all the way back to when they were colonies of France and Spain. 
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 2018 5:47 PM
I found this video to be very insightful into the relationship Haiti has with the Dominican Republic and how the Haitian government has formed into what it is today. It was especially informative for myself because I didn't know very much about these countries before watching this video. I knew Haiti was the first slave colony to have a successful revolt against their slave holders, but I didn't know or realize all the consequences of that slave uprising. It seems like Haiti wasn't given a proper chance right off the bat to succeed as a nation. The French overworked their land and destroyed the soil which is still a problem today. Once Haiti declared independence, many nations enforced embargoes on Haiti because it was considered a threat due to it being a black republic, which strangled their potential for a strong economy. Adding to that France demanded a large sum of money from Haiti after they declared independence because France was upset about losing profits from the colony, which hindered the Haitian economy even more. It's too bad that Haiti got a bad hand of cards right from the beginning, I hope that one day they can rise above adversity, and truly flourish as a nation.
tyrone perry's curator insight, March 15, 2018 2:43 AM
watching this showed many disturbing facts about the island shared by the D.R. and Haiti.  because of both of their previous owners the island went in two different directions.  Haiti owned by the French brought over many slaves to pillage and exploit their side of the Island.  Haiti could not flourish because of racism and debt.  D.R. had a different history the Spaniards integrated with the locals and worked together to help the country grow.  they took care of their land and their was no racism playing any role in destroying the people of that country.  driving up and down the you can see the difference on both sides.  Haiti has a bare and eroded land while the D.R. has lush jungles.  according to the narrator there is strong racism towards the Haitians by the Dominicans.  Even thou they both share the island the Dominicans look down on the Haitians and refuse to help them even thou D.R. is a so to speak rich nation they could really help improve and grow both nations as a whole.  Its sad to see that the reason people cant grow is because of systemic and blatant racism. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Teaching About the Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar

Teaching About the Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Why are hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees fleeing Myanmar? Who are the Rohingya and why are they being persecuted? What responsibility does the world have to end what the United Nations is calling 'ethnic cleansing' and many are labeling 'genocide'? In this lesson, students will first learn about the crisis unfolding in Myanmar using Times reporting, videos, podcasts and photography. Then, we suggest a variety of activities for going deeper, such as tackling universal questions about national identity and minority rights, considering the responsibility of the world community, and going inside the squalid refugee camps sprawling across the border in Bangladesh."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This issue is not as firmly fixed in our minds as it should be.  So much of our media's attention is on less substantial issues, that when they compile resources for teachers on a subject like this, it deserves mentioning.  Even if you have already read your 10 free monthly articles from the NY Times, you can still watch the video embedded in the lesson. Attached is a worksheet that I will be using in my classes (feel free to adapt and use).

 

Tags: Rohingyagenocide, migration, politicalconflict, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

more...
M Sullivan's curator insight, October 26, 2017 3:33 AM
Useful for linking 'Bamboo People' with current crisis in Myanmar
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 26, 2017 10:27 AM

Global challenges: Population

Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 9:22 PM
Resources such as this are extremely important for anyone that wants to teach about humanitarian issues going on around the world.  Giving a step-by-step on where to learn more about the crisis, activities to do to engage students, and the discuss the role of the media. This is important to talk about for anyone as ethnic cleansings as things we all should be watching for and combatting. 
 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What regions can you identify as a part of a trend?  What possible factors have led to these patterns?  What are the long-term implications of this data? 

 

Tags: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration. 

 

more...
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 1, 2018 9:35 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
K Rome's curator insight, October 7, 2018 12:31 AM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 2018 7:45 AM
This article shows the population patterns of Europe between 2001 and 2011. Many cities have had a high rise in average annual population of 2 percent or more. This map also shows that there has been more migration in northwest Europe. Citizens have left certain cities in search of better job opportunities. The population in Germany is sparse except in Berlin. Spain has had a big drop in population overall. Many people living in more rural regions have moved to cities and many others are moving to coasts for retiring or downsizing.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis

The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Life has long been fraught for a Muslim minority in mainly Buddhist Myanmar, but the recent “ethnic cleansing” has sent Rohingya fleeing en masse.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many students have asked the question "Who are the Rohingya?" The Muslim minority group, concentrated near the Bangladeshi has a long history of marginalization. Its members lack full citizenship in Myanmar (Burma), and many in Myanmar deny that the Rohingya are a native ethnic group, claiming that they are recent Bengali immigrants. Now, fierce clashes between security forces and Rohingya militants left hundreds dead and entire villages torched to the ground. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have fled over the border into Bangladesh.

 

Tags: migration, politicalconflict, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 2017 8:07 AM

Global challenges - Population - including Migration - refugees

David Stiger's curator insight, November 30, 2018 5:20 PM
It is often hard to imagine how a government sponsors or directly commits acts of genocide against its own people. When studying the geographic factors and history of a place, outsiders can begin to fathom how divisions and difference can turn into hate-fueled violence. But, genocides do not just spontaneously happen. There is a buildup overtime. The only way a genocide can occur is if some form of dehumanization takes place against a group of people. In the case of the Rohingya - an ethnic minority population in Myanmar - the government fails to recognize them as citizens. Denying rights and citizenship to people means they are not equal with others and that is a form of dehumanization. While the Rohingya are mostly Muslim in a Buddhist majority country, the divisions go much deeper. Myanmar's government believes that the Rohingya are refugees from Bangladesh who fled under British rule during the 1800s, negating any legitimate claim to the land they are living on. The Rohingya dispute this arguing their ancestors migrated to the land of Rohang (now called the Rakhine State of Myanmar) during the 1400s. Regardless of whose narrative is accurate, the Rohingya,  like the Gypsies in Europe, have been excluded and viewed as outsiders. By not being integrated into mainstream society, there has been a lack of social and economic advancement for the Rohingya leading to widespread poverty which creates a vicious cycle. The discriminatory and repressive practices against the Rohingya has led to violent backlash by some Rohingya against Buddhists. This in turn led to military crackdowns, destruction, and forced migration by Myanmar's government. The situation escalated when a Rohingya insurgency rose up and attacked military targets. This most recent episode is what has led to the current acts of genocide. Myanmar's government has justified its actions by espousing a war on terrorist groups. International watchdogs have observed the military operations are also targeting innocent Rohingya civilians, morphing into ethnic-cleansing. 

Powerful nations like the U.S. and the E.U. should sanction Myanmar until they own up to what they've done. After Myanmar is held accountable, the government should offer full rights and citizenship in exchange for the disbandment of the Rohingya insurgency. From there, health care services and educational programs need to be administered to help the Rohingya integrate into society. 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 10:00 PM
An ethnic cleansing is occurring today in Myanmar. The Rohingya, a Muslim minority in the Rakhine state have been forcibly removed for their homes by soldiers and extremists.  Their homes are homes, villages and land destroyed. Many are leaving Myanmar all together and running to the border of Bangladesh for safety.  The President of Myanmar, Nobel Peace prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, has stayed mostly quiet regarding the attacks, while the UN has also condemned the actions of the army.  A story to continue watching as it develops. 
1
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 21, 2017 3:34 AM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 13, 2017 2:01 AM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 9:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo

Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

more...
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 2017 5:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 13, 2017 2:02 AM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Water Is Life

Hundreds of thousands of refugees have fled South Sudan to escape the civil war. When they arrive in Uganda, water is what they need most. Without it, they will die.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Next to nothing in this video will make you happy about the way things operate for refugees in Northern Uganda who have fled from South Sudan.  We all know the about the dire conditions that refugees face, but knowing about the specifics, and hearing stories from the refugees about their lives and living conditions is powerful.  A huge influx of refugees can tax local resources, especially water.  Food can be shipped in, but water a much more locally variable resource.   The UN refugee camps recommend at least 15 liters of water per person be made available each day, but often it is more like 4-8 liters in these camps.  Dedicated wells (or boreholes) are more effective, but costly.  Trucking in water from the Nile River is the preferred method to simply keep these drowning people’s heads above water.    

 

Questions to Ponder: Consider how much water you drink, use for cooking, bathing, etc. per day in your household.  How difficult would it be to live on 4 liters of water a day?  What about your lifestyle would be changed? 

 

TagsAfrica, development, Uganda, South Sudan, migrationrefugees, environment, waterenvironment depend, sustainability, resources.

more...
Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 9, 2017 4:49 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Interrelationships; Geographic Perspective;
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2017 5:15 PM

Next to nothing in this video will make you happy about the way things operate for refugees in Northern Uganda who have fled from South Sudan.  We all know the about the dire conditions that refugees face, but knowing about the specifics, and hearing stories from the refugees about their lives and living conditions is powerful.  A huge influx of refugees can tax local resources, especially water.  Food can be shipped in, but water a much more locally variable resource.   The UN refugee camps recommend at least 15 liters of water per person be made available each day, but often it is more like 4-8 liters in these camps.  Dedicated wells (or boreholes) are more effective, but costly.  Trucking in water from the Nile River is the preferred method to simply keep these drowning people’s heads above water.    

 

Questions to Ponder: Consider how much water you drink, use for cooking, bathing, etc. per day in your household.  How difficult would it be to live on 4 liters of water a day?  What about your lifestyle would be changed? 

 

TagsAfrica, development, Uganda, South Sudan, migrationrefugees, environment, water,  environment depend, sustainability, resources.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Revised executive order bans travelers from six Muslim-majority countries from getting new visas

Revised executive order bans travelers from six Muslim-majority countries from getting new visas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The president is expected to sign his new, more limited rule Monday.
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's hard to discuss this topic in detail without a partisan political views.  Underneath all of those opinions are geographic perspective about how the world works as well as geographical imaginations on how things should operate. 

 

Tags: migrationrefugees, war, political, terrorism, ISISMiddle East, conflict.

more...
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 7, 2018 2:26 PM
One of President Trump's first acts as President was the  "Muslim Ban" as it was so often referred to.  In this article it explains the changes that the ban has gone through since it was first blocked and the differences between it and what the Obama administration did with it polices. We can also look at Europe and debate its policies as well on immigration and what polices they have enacted over the past few years as well. This is a hotly debated issue between both parties right now and into the future, not just an issue, but an issue I am sure will be debated in elections ahead. When looking at this issue we have to look beyond what the main political points will be and try use some of of our own sense on the issue. With so much upheaval in this area is it safe to take in people from it? It is a legit question one must pose especially with the increase in terrorist attacks over the past few years. Could the US or countries in Europe have avoided with a better process? Who really knows for sure. It is in everyone's best interest to make this area more livable for its current citizens. Since that would calm everyone on the immigration issue. How do major world powers get involved in this situation then? That becomes the issue as the the last elections in the US and other countries alike have pushed for more in house or in country work as opposed to overseas involvement.  This will not be the last time this comes up, just wait til 2018 and I am sure in 2020 elections. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Language: The cornerstone of national identity

Language: The cornerstone of national identity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Of the national identity attributes included in the Pew Research Center survey, language far and away is seen as the most critical to national identity. Majorities in each of the 14 countries polled say it is very important to speak the native language to be considered a true member of the nation."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Most Europeans see language as a strong prerequisite to be a part of the "national identity."  Immigration has put a strain on cultural identities that are often very political. A majority of European agree on the link between language and national identity, but not surprisingly, the older Europeans and those on the political right feel more strongly about the importance of speaking the national language to truly 'belong.'

 

Tags: language, culturepolitical, Europe, migration, ethnicity.

more...
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, February 6, 2018 2:03 PM
The link between language and national identity is important as shown in this article as Europeans believe it is the the number one link and most important.  From an American standpoint this was interesting to read as the trend nowadays, especially in America is to be more open to multiple languages and always viewing Europe as a place where many of the people that would live their would speak multiple languages as well.  How we communicate with people is very important obviously and now it has even become a political issue.  If you tend to lend more left you link national identity and language less and if you lean more right you tend to link national identity and language more. This is something that will continue to play out in the United States over the next decade as the Hispanic community continues to grow in the country and language will come to the forefront. While America has always been a melting pot of people, English has always survived as its dominate language and a way to identify Americans. Twenty or Thirty years from now will that continue? Will Americans lose that as and Identity, how will that effect them? Will this become a major political battle as well, how will this play out in elections in 2020, 2024, 2028, and beyond. Some very interesting trends to look at.  
Douglas Vance's curator insight, February 9, 2018 8:37 PM
For most of Europe, but especially older and more conservative Europeans, being able to speak the language of the country you live in is incredibly closely tied to national identity. Therefore, immigrants who arrive and do not speak the language are viewed as "others" and not belonging. This close tie between language and national identity serves as one of the fuels for anti-immigrant sentiments in many European nations. Although this sentiment is not confined to just Europe.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 9, 2018 7:26 PM
(Europe) Throughout Europe and North America, the majority of citizens believe the national language is essential to the country's identity. For immigrants to be considered a part of these countries, the majority believe proficiency is required. In the United States, age, education, and religion are all factors contributing to this view, however race has little effect on people's view of language. Like America, older and more conservative Europeans place a higher emphasis on language. National identity can be a geopolitical problem for the European Union because some countries believe the 24 official languages subvert autonomy and internal unity. Interestingly Canada, a country with two official languages, places a lessor importance on language, with only a 59% majority believing it is fundamental to identity.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The ESRI storymap on climate refugees does a phenomenal job sampling locations in the world that experience migration effects as a result of climate change. Attached is a guided worksheet that accompanies the ESRI Climate Migrant Storymap."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change and one APHG teacher has created a fabulous worksheet to guide students through this great resource.   

 

TagsAPHG, climate changemigrationrefugees, environment, coastalmappingESRIStoryMap, political ecology.

more...
Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 26, 2017 7:51 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Americans Moving at Historically Low Rates

Americans Moving at Historically Low Rates | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The percentage of Americans moving over a one-year period fell to an all time low in the United States to 11.2 percent in 2016.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, when I've taught world regional geography, I've often discussed a major regional characteristic of North America is the high degree of internal mobility...that appears to be changing and it brings up more questions than answers.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Are there regions in the United States where people are less likely to move?  How does mobility impact economic, cultural, and political patterns in the United States? Why are less people moving now than before?  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, USA, statistics.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 31, 2016 1:29 AM

Internal migration in USA can make an interesting comparison with Australia 

 

Syllabus 

Internal migration  

Students investigate reasons for and effects of internal migration in Australia and another country, for example: 

  • analysis of trends in temporary and permanent internal migration
  • discussion of economic, social or environmental
  • consequences of internal migration on places of origin and destination

Geoworld 9 NSW

Chapter 7: Urban settlement patterns Australia and USA

 

Chapter 8: Migration changes Australia and USA

8.8 Australians are mobile people

8.9 Mobile indigenous populations

8.10 Lifestyle migration

8.11 The power of resources

8.12 Migration changes the USA