Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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USGS's Streamer Tool

USGS's Streamer Tool | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Streamer is a new way to visualize and understand water flow across America. With Streamer you can explore our Nation's major streams by tracing upstream to their source or downstream to where they empty.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Streamer is the online mapping application that lets anyone explore downstream and upstream along America’s rivers and streams (here is a YouTube tutorial). Streamer can be used to follow the paths of rivers up to their headwaters and down to the sea, to view location-related information such as weather radar and near real-time streamflow data, and to discover hydrologic connections between distant places.

 

Scoop.it Tags: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

WordPress TAGS: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

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The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers

The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Hinduism shares an intricate, intimate relationship with the climate, geography, and biodiversity of South Asia; its festivals, deities, mythology, scriptures, calendar, rituals, and even superstitions are rooted in nature. There is a strong bond between Hinduism and South Asia’s forests, wildlife, rivers, seasons, mountains, soils, climate, and richly varied geography, which is manifest in the traditional layout of a typical Hindu household’s annual schedule. Hinduism’s existence is tied to all of these natural entities, and more prominently, to South Asia’s rivers.

 

Hinduism as a religion celebrates nature’s bounty, and what could be more representative of nature’s bounty than a river valley? South Asian rivers have sustained and nourished Hindu civilizations for centuries. They are responsible for our prosperous agriculture, timely monsoons, diverse aquatic ecosystems, riverine trade and commerce, and cultural richness.  Heavily dammed, drying in patches, infested by sand mafia and land grabbers, poisoned by untreated sewage and industrial waste, and hit by climate change — our rivers, the cradle of Hinduism, are in a sorry state.

 

If there is ever a threat to Hinduism, this is it. Destroy South Asia’s rivers and with it, Hinduism’s history and mythology will be destroyed. Rituals will turn into mockery, festivals, a farce, and Hinduism itself, a glaring example of man’s hypocritical relationship with nature. The fact that we worship our rivers as mothers and then choke them to death with all sorts of filth is already eminent.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This might be a controversial op-ed because it has a strong perspective on the religious and environmental dimensions of modern Indian politics...that said, I think it is well worth the read.  The Ganges is both a holy river, and a polluted river; that juxtaposition leads to many issues confronting India today. 

 

Tagsculturereligion, India, South Asia, Hinduism, pollution, industry,   environment, sustainability, consumption, fluvial

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Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 2018 1:21 AM
Religion is shaped by the geography of the region in which it develops.  For example, Hinduism is heavily influenced by the rivers of India, and these rivers are considered holy places sites and places of cleansing and purification.  However, the cleansing power of the rivers is diminished by pollution that makes it unsafe to take part in ritual bathing.  Pollution, climate change, and deforestation are also having an impact on other aspects of Hinduism, which is about celebrating nature in it's entirety, including monsoons, forests, and agriculture.  As nature continues to be negatively impacted by human activity, many aspects of Hinduism will also be negatively impacted.
David Stiger's curator insight, November 12, 2018 3:19 PM
Sometimes both sides can be wrong in an argument, as illustrated in this article. The secular left in India has mistaken their conservative Hindu counterparts as a people stuck in tradition, unable to address the environmental calamities facing modern society. The more right-leaning Hindus believe the secular environmentalism of their countrymen to be antagonistic to the practice of Hinduism - such as the environmental restrictions on firecrackers. Hindus celebrating Diwali feel that fireworks are a central part of the festivities and do not want environmentalists restricting them. The author notes that both sides have missed the point. Hinduism is closely tied to nature and expresses notions of environmental stewardship as a holy endeavor. Liberal Indians do not need to see Hinduism as opposed to environmental sustainability and should stop criticizing Hinduism as a whole. Traditionally religious Hindus should be aware that their own faith would have them be environmentalists - not because of secularism - but because of divine inspirations to coexist with nature. While both sides bicker, failing to understand how Hinduism is pro-nature, the rivers are being ruined by pollution. This pollution will destroy nature, and nature is the foundation and driving force of the Hindu religion. This is because Hinduism was founded around a  river valley civilization - the river and arable land being central to the culture's vitality. 

In some ways, this situation reminds me of Christianity in America. Liberals are very concerned about the environment and climate change in particular. Conservative Christians, buying into a theology of "Dominionism" of Genesis, believe God gave the earth to humans to use however they please. Paired with a suspicion of science, conservative evangelicals have largely shunned environmental sustainability and conservation. A closer reading of the Bible would show that God values nature and wants creation to grow and thrive. Humans should be stewards of the environment - its destined caretakers. Instead, liberals think Christianity preaches stupidity while conservative Christians believe the science behind environmentalism is anti-God, aligned with communism, and probably a hoax to manipulate the faithful. 


Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 3:08 PM
The river plays a key role in India. Whether its culture, religion, histor,y in agriculture, in transportation, and in many other aspects. These once bountiful rivers that sustained Indian civilizations are now threatened by pollution, climate change, damns, and other man made reasons. At best if this is problem is not solved it will lead to drastic changes in Indian society, at worse it could lead to the collapse of Indian society, Starting with the end of Hindu rituals. 
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When Climate Change Meets Sprawl: Why Houston's ‘Once-In-A-Lifetime' Floods Keep Happening

When Climate Change Meets Sprawl: Why Houston's ‘Once-In-A-Lifetime' Floods Keep Happening | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Unchecked development remains a priority in the famously un-zoned city, creating short-term economic gains for some, but long term flood risk for everyone."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Houston's development boom and reduction of wetlands leave region prone to more severe flooding.  Here is a great map of the change in impervious surfaces in the region from 1940 to 2017--when you combine that with record-breaking rainfall the results are catastrophic.  But a local understanding of place is critical and this viral post--Things non-Houstonians Need to Understand--is pretty good.     

 

Tagsphysical, fluvialwatercoastal, urban, planningtransportation, architecture.

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Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:56 PM

Houston's development boom and reduction of wetlands leave region prone to more severe flooding.  Here is a great map of the change in impervious surfaces in the region from 1940 to 2017--when you combine that with record-breaking rainfall the results are catastrophic.  But a local understanding of place is critical and this viral post--Things non-Houstonians Need to Understand--is pretty good.     

 

Tagsphysical, fluvialwatercoastal, urban, planningtransportation, architecture.

Tiffany Cooper's curator insight, September 26, 2017 11:11 AM
#geo130
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, October 31, 2017 1:27 PM

Un dossier sur les inondations à Houston (en anglais). La présentation est très originale.

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Skokomish River salmon cross the road

"Watch salmon race across the road on their way to spawn; for more footage, watch this extended version."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We often see examples of how human modifications to ecosystems or watersheds have devastatingly negative impacts.  This is a remarkable example from Washington's Olympic Peninsula that shows the resiliency of natural systems to overcome human modifications to the physical landscape.  If you study the world, you will always have something to both amaze and surprise you.   

 

Tagsfluvial, biogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, environment adapt, environment modify.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:45 PM

Sometimes the natural world finds ways to adapt to human environmental changes. 

Useful when studying inland water / rivers for the option study. 

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Mekong Delta fights losing battle against salt water

Vietnam's rice region is facing the worst drought to date. Over half a million people have been affected, and the country could lose one million tons of its staple food.Leaders of six countries along the Mekong River met in China to discuss the relief measures.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  As dams upstream are slowing the flow of the Mekong River, the low-lying delta that is a rich agricultural region is facing the ocean water that is moving further inland.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiencing some impacts of globalization. 

 

Tags: fluvial, waterVietnamagriculture, SouthEastAsia.

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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 2018 1:18 PM
The location of the pristine rice growing lands on the Mekong delta have also put that very land at risk for destruction. The slow of the flow of water from upstream has allowed saltwater to permeate inland and destroy enormous swaths of land by making them impossible to grow rice due to the salt. For a country like Vietnam that is so heavily dependent on rice exports in a globalized economy, this loss of production could prove to be devastating. 
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 17, 2018 12:01 PM
Vietnam is facing a huge problem that being drought. Because of the drought the Vietnamese are on the verge of possibly losing one million tons of there staple food that being rice. Even though the Mekong looks flooded and has plenty of water. That water is toxic to the crops because its salt water. The water that is coming downstream is reducing allowing for more salt water from the sea to come in ruining people crops and lives.
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NOAA's GFS model visualized on NOAA’s Science on a Sphere

NOAA's powerful Global Forecast System model was upgraded on May 11, 2016, providing forecasters with a more accurate 4-D picture of how a weather system will evolve. The upgrade is the latest of a number of model improvements rolling out this spring and summer, thanks to increased supercomputing power NOAA acquired earlier this year.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There's some good science with practical applications underneath this very artistic rendering of the planet's atmosphere...it is more fluvial than we give it credit for if we only think of air as empty space.  This video also reminds me of the words of one pilot and his perspective on both the atmosphere and Earth from above: "Geographically speaking, the sky is like a whole other planet encasing our own."

 

Tags: atmosphere, space, video, physical, fluvial.

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Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is brilliant.  I can't say how much I love this. 

 

Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, landscape, funart.

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The memory of a river

The memory of a river | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If you measure the contours of a river valley with Lidar (like radar with lasers), you get a beautiful map of all the historical river channels."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Here's a meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

 

Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 29, 2016 3:42 AM

For the beauty of this picture. Follow the link to see the ancient courses of Mississippi River, I had once the idea to draw maps of the lower course of the Loue River in France not in a scientific purpose, but just for a kind of fractal art.

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The Geography of New Orleans

The Geography of New Orleans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geographers make a distinction between site and situation as they consider the underlying foundation of a place. Few cities represent such a wide chasm between these two aspects as does New Orleans. The situation, or the answer to why does a place exist, was imperative. The Mississippi River was a major artery for the North American continent. As first the Europeans and then the Americans assumed control of the area, a port was essential at the mouth of this river. But the site, the response to where a city is placed, continues to confound. Few environments were or are more inhospitable to human habitation. Poor soil, disease, floods, and hurricanes are constant threats that have plagued the city for over three centuries. But the why trumped the where and hence the paradox of New Orleans persists.
Seth Dixon's insight:

New Orleans is the classic example to use to explain the difference between site and situation...lousy site, incredible situation.  These maps are a nice introduction to the city.  

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Gilbert C FAURE's comment, November 27, 2015 8:08 AM
names of streets were obviously french!
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Floods might have doomed prehistoric American city

Floods might have doomed prehistoric American city | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Cahokia settlement's decline began in 1200, around time of major Mississippi River surge.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In a flat landscape, what represents power more than a towering mound?  My family loved our excursion to this site and it show so many geographic issues. 


Tagsfluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape, environment depend, environment adapthistorical.

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How Wolves Change Rivers

"When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

When a complex system gets one aspect of it changed, there are many other changes that occur, some of which are nearly impossible to envision beforehand.  Here is some Oregon State research on the changes in Yellowstone's ecosystems and physical environments since the introduction of wolves. 


Tagsecology, biogeography, environment, environment adapt, physical, fluvial.

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Why Do Rivers Curve?

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this Minute Earth video might make geomorphology experts cringe at some of the vocabulary in this, it still is a good introduction to the absolute basics of fluvial geomorphology, or how and why rivers reshape the Earth.   Fun fact: Albert Einstein pondered some of the great mysteries of the Earth, and in 1926 wrote an article on this very subject (actual paper can be read here).  


Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sally Egan's curator insight, December 7, 2014 4:27 PM

A very siual form using simple language to explain the meandering of rivers. Applicable to the course work on Hydrosphere.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

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Louisiana Loses Its Boot

Louisiana Loses Its Boot | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The boot-shaped state isn’t shaped like that anymore. So, we revised its iconic outline to reflect the truth about a sin…
Seth Dixon's insight:

Maps shape how we think about places.  In mapping, we can reveal or conceal important pieces of information but sometimes the phenomena don't fit the easy binaries.  In most places there is land, a coastline and then water (simple enough), but Louisiana's coastline is much more complicated with large regions being more of a coastal zone than a neat line.  That accounts for some of the inaccuracies mapping Louisiana, but some lies are so convenient, that many people want the fiction to continue.  It is comforting to think about places as permanent, and admitting that it isn't is acknowledging that there might be a problem.  As stated in this article, "the boot is at best an inaccurate approximation of Louisiana’s true shape and, at worst, an irresponsible lie."  To explore the issue yourself, this gorgeous interactive map pulls together some high quality source materials on a wide range of issues to look at this environmental issues of this region in a holistic manner.


Tagsmappingcoastalenvironment, erosion, landscape., physical, fluvial.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

(North America topic 7)
Just like geography and history textbooks become obsolete the day they're published (thanks to Professors Dixon and Bonin for the phrase!), the same can be said for maps and icons.

This article uses the example of Louisiana's state highway signs, which show the outline of the state... well, according to data from the 1930s. While an updated sign isn't as pretty, it does bring about the truth that the landscape is changing, and on a larger scale this is true for the entire world, especially with influence from development and climate change.
However, I can relate to the other side of the argument too. Tossing the old LA symbol would toss a historical reminder of what once was. The same can be said for New Hampshire's Old Man of the Mountain road signs and license plates. I'd hate to see the profile removed, especially since what is symbolizes still lives on in the hearts of many residents and visitors, including myself.

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Houston’s stories of Hurricane Harvey

Houston’s stories of Hurricane Harvey | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Blue and her team selected 45 stories, each plotted with ESRI’s ArcGIS software on a map of Greater Houston and tied to the exact location where it was first told. The resulting story map of Hurricane Harvey, ‘Damaged and Defiant: Houston Stories,’ was published in the Houston Chronicle in December. The map shows short narratives gathered by Chronicle staffers from people across the area — from Crosby to Kingwood to Katy — each a unique perspective on the storm; told together, they’re the collective account of a city that experienced one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These interlinked Houston story maps show some of the key elements of a good story map: 1) strong spatial analytical components, 2) a powerful narrative, 3) rich visuals, 4) solid cartography, and 5) well-sourced information.

 

Tags: fluvialwatercoastal, urban, disasters, physical, mappingESRIStoryMap.

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The 10 Worst River Basins Contributing to Ocean Plastics

The 10 Worst River Basins Contributing to Ocean Plastics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"[A new paper], published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, calculates that rivers contribute between 410,000 and 4 million tonnes a year to oceanic plastic debris, with 88 to 95% [of that total] coming from only 10. Those rivers are the Yangtze, Yellow, Hai He, Pearl, Amur and Mekong in east Asia, the Indus and Ganges Delta in south Asia, and the Niger and Nile in Africa."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Of river-based plastic pollution, these 10 rivers are responsible for 88%-95% of all the plastic gyrating in the world's oceans.  Improvement in these key places could make a world of difference in improving marine ecosystems (NOTE: the map came from this alternative article on the same subject).

 

Tags: pollution, water, environmentsustainability, consumption, fluvial.

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Matt Richardson's curator insight, January 3, 2018 1:22 PM
Baltimore harbor has an odd contraption that is scooping plastic out of Jones Falls before it reaches the outer harbor. If only this machine could operate in these 10 river systems, which are contributing waste to our embattled/trashed/overfished/warming oceans. .
Matt Manish's curator insight, April 4, 2018 12:44 PM
It struck me as odd to learn that the majority of plastic that winds up in the ocean isn't actually from ocean activities. Also, that these ten rivers contribute up to 88 to 95% of plastics in the ocean. This is a huge margin of these materials coming from these ten major river systems, most of them being in Asia. This makes me wonder why are mostly Asia's rivers carrying so much trash to ocean. It could be the major cities sitting along the banks that are dumping trash into the river and letting float down steam. Also, I wonder if there possibly isn't an efficient enough sanitation system set up in Asia which could lead to more people just throwing their trash into these rivers. To summarize, something from the data in this article tells me that their is a common denominator as to why most of the rivers that carry the largest amount of plastic materials to the ocean every year are located in Asia.
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 1:48 PM
In East Asia the Yangtze, Yellow, Hai He, Pearl Amur, Mekong. South Asia, Indus, Ganges Delta and in Africa the Niger and Nile River are responsible for dumping 4 million tonnes of plastic into the sea each year. Previous research has found 1/4 of plastic and trash comes from marine activity such as ships, fishing boats or drilling platforms. The 4/5 left comes from land totals 4.8 to 12 million tonnes. 
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Water worlds: can you guess the city from the river?

Water worlds: can you guess the city from the river? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Designer Alex Szabo-Haslam has stripped out the street names and highlighted the water features around 11 world cities. Can you identify them?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fun map quiz that is part memory, but also relies on pattern recognition to see if you can understand the urban morphology that shaped these places. 

 

Tags: urbanfluvial, trivia, games.

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Iceland's Glacial Melt and Geothermal Activity

Iceland's Glacial Melt and Geothermal Activity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Glacial melting and flooding occurs every year by the Skafta River in Iceland. As the water travels down towards the North Atlantic Ocean, incredible patterns are created on the hillsides. Rising lava, steam vents, or newly opened hot springs can all cause this rapid ice melt, leading to a sizable release of water that picks up sediment as it flows down from the glaciers.

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.

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The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River

The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For hundreds of years, on the eighth month of the lunar calendar, people have gathered along the shores of China’s Qiantang River at the head of Hangzhou Bay to witness the waves of its famous bore tide. Higher-than-normal high tides push into the harbor, funneling into the river, causing a broad wave that can reach up to 30 feet high. If the waves surge over the banks, spectators can be swept up, pushed along walkways or down embankments. Below, I’ve gathered images from the past few years of the Qiantang bore tides.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an amazing set of images, where a cultural phenomenon is wrapped up in observing the pulsating physical geography of the river.  Usually the tidal bore is impressive (but not dangerous--see video here), but occasionally it can be incredibly violent (see this 2015 video).   

 

Tags: physical, geomorphologywaterChina.

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Kiran's comment, September 24, 2016 8:33 AM
http://onlinemoviesvideos.com/
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 28, 2016 8:56 PM

Tital bores - the values of water 

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Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers

Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

On occasion, we are reminded of how utterly captivating and gorgeous nature is, its visual poetry surrounds us. It just takes a step back, a shift in perspective, to realize how amazing the constructs of this planet are; it’s a beautiful constant balance between order and entropy. Case in point, what appears to be well-crafted, intricate abstract paintings, or works of art, are in reality, mindblowing aerial images of Iceland."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.

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Joaquín del Val's curator insight, May 27, 2016 1:20 PM
Espectaculares imágenes de canales fluviales en Islandia
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All the roads that lead to Rome

All the roads that lead to Rome | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As the saying goes, 'All roads lead to Rome.' Folks at the moovel lab were curious about how true this statement is, so they tested it out. They laid a grid on top of Europe, and then algorithmically found a route from each cell in the grid to Rome, resulting in about half a million routes total. Yep, there seems to be a way from Rome from every point."

 

Tags: fluvial, mobility, transportationmapping.

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Gilbert C FAURE's comment, January 24, 2016 11:09 AM
a new geography of europe! fascinating for politicians
Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, January 24, 2016 11:10 AM

une nouvelle géographie de l'Europe! pour les politiques!!

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, January 24, 2016 1:00 PM

But many roads didn't leave Rome ... a small detail that has been lost to history.

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Rare Ice Circles

The beauty and artistry of nature is truly shown in the phenomenon of ice circles!

 

Tags: physicalweather and climatefluvial.

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Www.TamSohbet.Com's comment, December 28, 2015 11:22 AM
http://Www.Tamsohbet.com /video/hadise.html :D
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Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake

Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It's difficult to comprehend the ridiculous amounts of water that have fallen in such a short time in a state that, until recently, had been in the grip of a historic drought. But one place to start would be to look at reservoir levels in the state. In the past 30 days, Texas reservoirs have gone from being 73 percent full to 82 percent full, according to data maintained by the Texas Water Development board. All told, about 8 million acre-feet of water have flowed into the state's reservoirs."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just how much of water is 8 million acre-feet?  It's almost impossible for most people to visualize that, but this series of graphics is designed to put the scale of the recent flooding in Texas into perspective (and yes, I love that Rhode Island is almost a unit of measurement).

  

Tags: water, fluvial, perspective, scale, Rhode Island.

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Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung

Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the heart of Thailand’s most populous city, an oasis stands out from the urban landscape like a great “green lung.” That’s the nickname given to Bang Kachao—a lush protected area that has escaped the dense development seen elsewhere in Bangkok.  The city is built on the alluvial plain of the Chao Phraya River. Toward the southern end, near the Gulf of Thailand, is an old meander that never quite formed an oxbow lake. That meander traces the boundary of Bang Kachao, which TIME magazine once called the 'best urban oasis' in Asia.  According to a travel story in The New York Times, Bang Kachao is gaining popularity among tourists lured by bike tours, a floating farmers’ market, and the relaxed atmosphere."


Tags: physical, fluvialremote sensing, land use, Thailand, Southeast Asia, urban ecology.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video in a good visual introduction to Bang Kacho in the Phra Pradaeng neighborhood of Bangkok from a nice travelers guide to the city.  

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Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:51 AM

This scoop shows an example of built environmental space. The highly urban and crowded Thailand has little green space. So why is this massive green park looking landmass there? Its a strictly environmental section of land to help water flow into the ocean. The people call it the "green lung" because its plants give off oxygen and provide a contrast from its urban sprawl. This article shows the importance that should be placed on having more strictly environmental places in big cities. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:06 PM

It's interesting to see the mixture of natural and manmade landscapes in this image. Humans have an enormous influence on the world around us- we have moved entire rivers for our own purposes, reshaped entire regions. In China, we have literally made it rain. Therefore, it's nice to see remnants of the rich environments that used to cover the urban sprawls of many of the world's largest cities, like Central Park in New York. Bang Kachao in Bangkok is another example of this, a reminder of the richness of the region before it was overwhelmed by the urban development that has characterized Bangkok over the previous century. The oasis serves as a valuable tourist attraction, as Westerners come to enjoy the bike trails and small farming community within Thailand's green lung. Leave it to hipsters to travel halfway across the globe just to enjoy nature within the confines of one of the world's largest cities. 

brielle blais's curator insight, May 3, 2018 3:55 PM
This showcases how important physical geography is. This "green lung" breaks up the high urbanized Bangkok. This helps the environment thrive and helps to cut down of emissions that affect climate change which is a problem in some areas. 
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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."


Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 2015 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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Meandering Stream Time Lapse

The most viral images on the internet, curated in real time by a dedicated community through commenting, voting and sharing.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fantastic way to visualize physical geographic processes. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 1:24 PM

El Sire Reserve in Peru is a river that has been monitored over the last 28 years. Every time I watch this short 6 second clip, I learn something different about how this river has changed. On the bottom of the screen, just past half way, the river just takes a huge short cut and cuts over and connects to a different part of the same river. This happens on the whole river too. there are 8 or 9 huge bends and curves in the river but by the end in 2012 there are only about 3 to 4 bends and curves. For some reason the water is taking short cuts and just leaving the spaces where the water used to run through and leaving it dry.  

Mathijs Booden's curator insight, January 20, 2016 8:35 AM

This is such a tangible way of showing things that seem abstract on a static map.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 6:28 AM

Een natuurlijk meanderende rivier