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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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U.S. Counties Vary by Their Degree of Partisan Prejudice

U.S. Counties Vary by Their Degree of Partisan Prejudice | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A guide to the most—and least—politically open-minded counties in America
Seth Dixon's insight:

I would like to start off by saying that I've lived in Red America and Blue America, and I love the people and places of both.  This is a fascinating set of maps because it isn't just about where are the Republicans and Democrats--we've all seen those maps.  More important to to me is attempting to discern where people can still see their neighbors as neighbors, even if they strongly disagree politically.  "In general, the most politically intolerant Americans, according to the analysis, tend to be whiter, more highly educated, older, more urban, and more partisan themselves."

 

 

GeoEd TAGS: electoral,  political, mapping.

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How to Win Florida

How to Win Florida | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It’s the southernmost section of the Deep South, the sixth borough of New York City, and the northernmost nation of Latin America. But even in the ultimate swing state, some voters are more equal than others."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Sure this article might be used for partisan purposes, but it's analysis of how a diverse group of interlocking demographic communities vote in the United States is very insightful.  This article doesn't focus on identity politics, but it does show how identity shapes political views and how the demographics of a particular constituency might shape the platforms of candidates. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What makes a swing state a swing state? How is Florida emblematic of the nation as a whole? 

 

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Election Results in the Third Dimension

Election Results in the Third Dimension | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By extending each region into the 3rd dimension, it’s possible to show the relative importance of each region while retaining the map’s shape, keeping the areas recognizable. In this case, the height of each county corresponds to its total number of votes, though it could just as easily show population or share of the electoral vote. For a closer look, see the full screen interactive version."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We've all probably seen enough maps of the 2016 presidential election and are familiar with the basic patterns (although my favorite is still the interactive that let's you redraw the states to alter the election).  This 3D map certainly though is an innovative way to portray some of the disparities in the U.S. electorate.

 

Tags: electoral, politicaldensity, mapping.

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HumdeBut's comment, December 29, 2016 6:22 AM
interesting graph !
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Election Cartograms

Election Cartograms | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The states are colored red or blue to indicate whether a majority of their voters voted for the Republican candidate, Donald Trump, or the Democratic candidate, Hillary Clinton, respectively. There is significantly more red on a traditional election maps than there is blue, but that is in some ways misleading: the election was much closer than you might think from the balance of colors, and in fact Clinton won slightly more votes than Trump overall. The explanation for this apparent paradox, as pointed out by many people, is that the map fails to take account of the population distribution. It fails to allow for the fact that the population of the red states is on average significantly lower than that of the blue ones.

We can correct for this by making use of a cartogram, a map in which the sizes of states are rescaled according to their population. That is, states are drawn with size proportional not to their acreage but to the number of their inhabitants, states with more people appearing larger than states with fewer, regardless of their actual area on the ground. On such a map, for example, the state of Rhode Island, with its 1.1 million inhabitants, would appear about twice the size of Wyoming, which has half a million, even though Wyoming has 60 times the acreage of Rhode Island."

 

Tags: electoral, scale, politicaldensity, mapping.

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Maps to change how you think about American voters — especially small-town, heartland white voters

Maps to change how you think about American voters — especially small-town, heartland white voters | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Small towns are as Democratic as big cities. Suburban and rural voters are the Republicans.

 

I have assembled a Web map from precinct-level 2008 election data that allows users to zoom in and out, focus in on specific towns or neighborhoods and superimpose census data on income and race, allowing readers to examine their own favorite postindustrial towns. One of the most striking lessons from exploring these maps is that the red non-metropolitan counties on election-night maps are internally heterogeneous, but always following the same spatial pattern: Democrats are clustered in town centers, along Main Street, and near the courthouses schools, and municipal buildings where workers are often unionized. They live along the old railroad tracks from the 19th century and in the apartment buildings and small houses in proximity to the mills and factories where workers were unionized in an earlier era.

Seth Dixon's insight:

There have been SOOOO many articles about the 2016 election, what happened, why it happened and how particular demographics voted and why.  Most of these articles are highly partisan, or ideologically informed but this just analysis of past spatial voting patterns  (I am waiting for the updated version of these maps to show what happened in 2016--but I'm thinking some of this changed).  Too often we’ve lumped the geography of small towns and rural areas as though they are one and the same.  Too often will only see electoral maps with state-level voting data or possibly county level data; but the sub-county scale reveals what would otherwise be missing in our assessment of electoral, spatial patterns (Scale matters?  Who knew?)

 

Tags: electoral, scale, political, mapping.

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What This 2012 Map Tells Us About America, and the Election

What This 2012 Map Tells Us About America, and the Election | Geography Education | Scoop.it
History, race, religion, identity, geography: The 2012 election county-level map has many stories to tell, including about the 2016 race.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The coverage of this election feels less objective than in past years (maybe that's just my perception, but that is why I've shared less electoral resources than in past years).  This article show's good map analysis and electoral patterns without much of any ideological or partisan analysis of the political platforms.  

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Republicans have a massive electoral map problem that has nothing to do with Donald Trump

Republicans have a massive electoral map problem that has nothing to do with Donald Trump | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If Clinton wins the 19 states (and D.C.) that every Democratic nominee has won from 1992 to 2012, she has 242 electoral votes. Add Florida's 29 and you get 271. Game over.

The Republican map [is more difficult] — There are 13 states that have gone for the GOP presidential nominee in each of the last six elections. But they only total 102 electorate votes.That means the eventual nominee has to find, at least, 168 more electoral votes to get to 270. 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't just the about the presidential election of 2016, but the demographic configuration of the United States and potential voter base of parties in the future.  As American demographics have shifted, the appeal of particular parties as well as their platforms will eventually shift in response.  Future party realignments will center on maps and demographics as much as they do policies and platforms.

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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How the states voted in every presidential election

The citizens of the United States have elected 44 presidents in 57 elections since the Constitution was adopted in 1789. Since the Civil War, presidential contests have been dominated by America's two major political parties – the Republicans and the Democrats. But over the last 150 years, state allegiance to these two parties has shifted greatly. Watch to see how the states voted in every presidential election since 1860.

 

Tags: electoralmapping.

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Cultural Politics

Cultural Politics | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A state-by-state look at our cultural politics.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While this doesn't say everything about the state of cultural politics in the United States, it does lay out some of the more ideologically charged debates in the new political landscape after the midterm electionsWhat does this Venn diagram say about the state of cultural politics in your state?   The Courts have aided the push for same sex marriages; will that also occur for marijuana legalization?


Tags: narcotics, sexuality, USA, electoral, political.

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All-Star Final Vote Distribution Visualization

All-Star Final Vote Distribution Visualization | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Data visualization of the 2013 MLB All-Star Final Vote distribution
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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 14, 2013 1:34 PM

AnotherAa other great geography source

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Urban-Rural Voting Patterns

Seth Dixon's insight:

Nate Silver became about as big of a celebrity as a statistician can become during the election (being called everything from a prophet to a witch).  This little nugget is obviously an overgeneralization, but it appears that is has enough substance to give it some serious consideration.  Where does this hold true and where is it false?  How come?   If it is true, why would this be true?

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Redistricting Results

Redistricting Results | Geography Education | Scoop.it

While this cartoon is flippant, the attached Washington Post article is not.  In the culumative congressional voting, Democrats have more votes but won fewer seats than the Republicans.  Many are starting to question the redistricting process after the 2010 census. 

  

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.

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Landon Conner's curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:34 AM

Democrats have won the popular vote roughly. But the Republicans are set to have the secone biggest house majority in 60 years according to the article. Republicans were favored in more house districts compared to democrats. Most of this is because democrats are in urban areas. LDC

Brealyn Holley's curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:53 AM

Since the redistricting has to do with the Republicans, which they have taken over more seats, but the Democrats have won the poll by a numerous number. You could see this from either side. A republican sees this as a good thing and the democrats would see this as a bad thing for them. ~BH

Cohen Adkins's curator insight, February 23, 2016 5:32 PM

Gerrymandering can cause problems in the political word.Not only can it make unfair elections but it can cause voters to become frustrated at how even though one region has more votes,the region is then seperated where its splitting the majority in half so they dont have the majority vote anymore. -C.A

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The Urban Electorate

The Urban Electorate | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Why Republicans Can't Afford to Concede the City Vote Ever Again."


Not trying to make a political statement, just bringing the geography into an analysis of the political landscape: the United States is an urban country and any political party hoping to win a national election must capture at least some of the major metropolitan areas of the country. That isn't ideological; that's simple urban geography and demographics making it's way into national politics.  "The math of assuming that the cities will go to Democrats is just a losing game going forward for Republicans."

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:23 PM

Republicans in American can't afford to lose metropolitan areas, yet don't have the greatest pull in these areas making it an uphill battle. The metropolitan vote is important to US elections. The functional region of urban areas make ideas move faster and come together, making it ideal for political gains.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 2015 6:46 PM
Unit 4 political geography
This picture explains how political development has created unbalanced geographical regions. In the U.S. today as the districts concede towards a less republican nation the Democrats take a more key aggressive way forward toward political dominance.
This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how much politics change and shape political and geographical boundaries. The movement of political parties changes the shape of the people we deal with today and the landscape of society overall.
Chris Plummer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 8:39 PM

Summary- This map shows the political geography between political parties.(Democrats and Republicans.) This map shows the regions and redrawing of districts to favor one party. It is evident that republican districts are very small to gain more votes in the city votes for president to gain a strategic advantage. The article states that the small districts come into play an "uneven city vote" for republicans. 

 

Insight- In parts of Unit 4, we study the effect of redrawing voting districts to gain a political advantage.(Gerrymandering). This map shows how the size and drawing of districts can effect a vote through geographic boundaries. The democratic districts are larger counting for less votes, While the creation of the smaller districts allows for more votes for republicans in the city vote. 

 

 

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New census data projects which states could gain or lose congressional seats in 2020 reapportionment

New census data projects which states could gain or lose congressional seats in 2020 reapportionment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
the Census Bureau released its population estimates for 2017 for every state, detailing how many residents each state has gained or lost since the 2010 census. The firm Election Data Services has used these estimates to project how many congressional seats each state might gain or lose in the 2020 round of reapportionment, which assigns each state its share of the House’s 435 districts based on its population.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Reapportionment is a forgotten step.  Before a state can redistrict the congressional districts within the state, every 10 years, the Federal government is constitutionally required to conduct a census with the main goal of being able to reapportion the congressional seats based on the decennial census.  The upcoming 2020 Census is big deal, showing regional population shifts with political ramifications.   

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

WordPress TAGS: electoral,  political, mapping.

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Political Bubbles and Hidden Diversity: Highlights From a Very Detailed Map of the 2016 Election

Political Bubbles and Hidden Diversity: Highlights From a Very Detailed Map of the 2016 Election | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Times’s interactive map of precinct results shows that even within partisan strongholds, there are contrary-voting enclaves.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This feature that shows the 2016 election results at the precinct level is astounding, revealing, and a testament to the difficulty of putting all this information together.  The built-in features in this interactive map to explore selected “voter islands” and one-sided places are especially helpful, but much like Google Earth, many people are eager to zoom in to their own neighborhoods.  The article that accompanies the interactive had some excellent case-studies at a variety of scales.  Geography always matters and the maps reveal so many telling patterns. 

 

Tags: electoral, politicaldensity, mapping.

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Clinton would have won if the United States looked like the top map

Clinton would have won if the United States looked like the top map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you tell what’s wrong with this map of the United States? I’ll give you a hint: Look near the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. Spot the problem yet? A further hint: Look at the border of Wisconsin and Illinois as well as the Florida Panhandle. See it now? The Wisconsin-Illinois border is slightly more southern and the Florida Panhandle is slightly shorter.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This mapping application is my favorite discovery after the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.  The election was obviously very contentious and incredibly close, both in regard to the popular vote as well as the Electoral College.  Using this mapping application, you can re-divide the states of the union by shifting the counties around.  Using the voting patterns based on the county-level data, you can see how your proposed divisions would have impacted the 2016 presidential election. 

There have been many plans on how to divide the 50 states into various regional configurations (50 states of equal population, regions of economic interactions, cultural regions, and the Nine Nations of America), and this is another iteration of that age-old theme. While this isn’t an activity in gerrymandering in the strictest sense (this is not reapportioning within the state based on population change but between states), it shows just how gerrymandering works.  It takes 270 electoral votes to win the presidency, but you could make it a landslide (in either direction) if you manipulate the current state borders.  The highest electoral vote I could engineer for Donald Trump was 407, and the highest electoral total I could manufacture for Hillary Clinton was 402.  The point of this is to show that the balance within and among states can be far more delicate than we might presume.  Just a line here or a line there can dramatically alter the balance of power.        

Activity #1: Try to make this a landslide victory for the Republican Party.  How many electoral votes could you garner for the Republicans? Add a screenshot.

Activity #2: Try to make this a landslide victory for the Democratic Party.  How many electoral votes could you garner for the Democrats? Add a screenshot.

Activity #3: Try to tip the election to the Democrats with the most subtle, minor changes that might go under the radar. Explain your changes to the state map.  Add a screenshot.   

 

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political, regionsNorth America.

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Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 13, 2018 4:14 PM
The electoral college is such a mess that it shouldn't be relied on for figuring out the President. With the misrepresentation of the map and the continuous gerrymandering the United States should use the popular vote category instead of the Electoral College. 
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US election 2016: Trump victory in maps

US election 2016: Trump victory in maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The map above shows where Mr Trump improved on the share of the vote achieved by Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate who failed to beat President Barack Obama in 2012.

 

Tags: electoral, political.

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Election maps are telling you big lies about small things

Election maps are telling you big lies about small things | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In 2012, 160 counties cast about the same number of votes as the rest of the country. But, your run-of-the-mill election map won't show you that.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is nothing new to most visitors to this site, but every four years we have a wonderful teaching moment to show how population density can change our interpretation of a map and the meaning of the data embedded in that map.  In preparation for next week, this article for the Washington Post as well as this one from the New York Times should help get students be better prepared for the onslaught of maps that we know are right around the corner, to properly assess and contextualize the geographic content in these maps.     

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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PBS Election Central

PBS Election Central | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Check out Election Central from PBS with tools, resources & solutions to engage students in the political process.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The first presidential election last night has intensified the already polarized political conversation in the United States. This is a great resource to explore historic political maps and cartograms.  It also has rich tools to project the possibilities for the 2016 election with ready-made lesson plans. 

 

Tags: electoral, politicalhistorical, mapping.

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Kelly Bellar's curator insight, September 29, 2016 10:32 PM

The first presidential election last night has intensified the already polarized political conversation in the United States. This is a great resource to explore historic political maps and cartograms.  It also has rich tools to project the possibilities for the 2016 election with ready-made lesson plans. 

 

Tags: electoral, politicalhistorical, mapping.

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U.S. religious groups and their political leanings

U.S. religious groups and their political leanings | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mormons are the most heavily Republican-leaning religious group in the U.S., while a pair of major historically black Protestant denominations – the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church and the National Baptist Convention – are two of the most reliably Democratic groups, according to data from Pew Research Center’s 2014 Religious Landscape Study."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religionUSA, electoral, political

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Ariel Juarez's curator insight, March 3, 2016 12:38 PM

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religion, USA, electoral, political. 

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 2016 9:40 AM

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religion, USA, electoral, political. 

Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 10, 2016 9:22 AM

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religionUSA, electoral, political

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Why Americans should care about the Canadian election

Why Americans should care about the Canadian election | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The close race comes after a decade of leadership by Stephen Harper, whose relationship with Barack Obama has suffered. But a victory for Justin Trudeau and the Liberals on Monday could help the US and Canada forge renewed ties
Seth Dixon's insight:

Last night the Liberals in Canada had a resounding victory...this will profoundly impact Canadian politics but also will change some of the frostiness in U.S.-Canadian relations.  Trudeau was stated that Canada will return to its old role in the world by reversing many of the conservative stances of the Harper government instituted over these last 10 years. 

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:12 PM

As Americans, we often forget about how major a player Canada is in all of our economic sectors. But, despite the ignorance of most American citizens on Canadian politics, the results of the coming election in Canada will have a major impact on the lives of every US citizen in the next few years (at least until the next US presidential election).

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Most Americans live in Purple America, not Red or Blue America

Most Americans live in Purple America, not Red or Blue America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"We're far less politically divided by geography than it may seem....Of course, it’s true that Americans aren’t of one mind on many political issues.  But it is important that we not look at these maps and infer that we are so politically polarized by geography.  In fact, most Americans live in places that are at least somewhat politically and ideologically diverse — even if that’s not reflected in how congressional district boundaries are drawn.   In terms of the most important driver of political choices — partisanship — most of us live in a purple America, not a red or blue America."

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Chamath Gunawardena's curator insight, December 15, 2013 5:06 PM

I like this article because it shows that the preference of a political party doesn't divide america completely so that that some states are completely republican or completely democratic. Showing that america isn't as politically divided in certain areas means we can view other's views in those areas as a unique view.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 2:01 PM

Americans are entitled to their own beliefs. If they want to be a democrat thats fine. If they want to be a republican thats fine too. Back in the day, this map may have looked different and more on the red and blue sides than purple, but in todays world people have changed. They are not entitled to be a democrat just because they live in a democratic society. People live in areas of purple (more so than just red or just blue), not red or blue and the purple color gives Americans a chance to think for themselves.

Gabby Watkins's curator insight, May 13, 2014 7:50 PM

Unit 5

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Esri Thematic Atlas

Esri Thematic Atlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Esri Thematic Atlas is a configurable web application that uses a collection of intelligent web maps with text, graphics, and images to talk about our world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

ESRI is moving towards creating a dynamic, authorative, living digital atlas and empowering users to create their own.  See this great political map of 2008 U.S. presidential election that is a part of the altas; it goes far beyond simple blue and red states.  StoryMaps are also democratizing the mapping process.  Explore these excellent examples of storymaps (Endangered Languages and top 10 physical landforms). 


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech.

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JMSS_Geography Resources's curator insight, June 26, 2013 1:20 AM

The Esri Thematic Atlas is a configurable web application that uses a collection of intelligent web maps with text, graphics, and images to talk about our world.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:53 AM

First unit is based on maps and atlases.  Want to build a range of resources.

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Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin

Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Shaped like a giant pistol sitting on its butt end, Wisconsin's new 22nd state Senate District is Exhibit A in the case against partisan redistricting.


Seth Dixon's insight:

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?

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2012 Election Cartograms

2012 Election Cartograms | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I'm sure most of you have seen the 2008 version of these fantastic maps and cartograms and they've been a go-to reference for me since the last election.  The typical red state/blue state map conceals much concerning the spatial voting patterns in the United States and fails to account for the population densities of these distributions.  That's what makes this county level voting maps and cartograms so valuable.  


Questions to Ponder: What new patterns can you see in the county map that you couldn't see in the state map?  What do the cartograms tell you about the United States population?  


Tags: cartography, mapping, rural, zbestofzbest.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 11:16 PM

I'm really glad at how the cartographer of this map was able to properly demonstrate the way the American population voted during the 2012 presidential  election. Unlike the map that we are accustomed to seeing on television during political elections. What I appreciate about this map is how it tries to represent the way in which Americans caste their votes. While you'd be led to believe that certain states voted a particular way, this map proves otherwise. Another thing that this map does is represent the states that are widely considered to be Republican, and Democratic. States that tend to be in favor of GDP are conservative states, such as that of the south with the exception of FL, and the rest of the country being fairly liberal. Nonetheless, this is definitely and interesting and telling map of our patterns as voters.