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The demographic time bomb that could hit America

The demographic time bomb that could hit America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Japan’s demographic crisis provides some lessons for where America might be headed."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This op-ed looks at the demographic trends of Japan's declining population and tries to see what this might mean for the United States. 

Questions to Ponder: What are the cultural and economic forces that lead to a declining population? What are some of the difficulties that confront countries with declining populations? 

 

GeoEd Tags: declining population, population, USA, Japan.

Scoop.it Tags: declining populations, population, USA, Japan.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, April 19, 10:40 AM
Population unit 
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Which Countries Have Shrinking Populations?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video explores some of the impacts of a declining population on a country (for example, a smaller workforce, economic decline, and growing public debt).  Eastern Europe as a region is used as the principle example and the countries of Bulgaria, Moldova, and Japan are highlighted. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration, Bulgaria, Moldova, Japan.

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Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 2017 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 4:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

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Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 2016 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
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Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015

Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It is quite significant that extremely high fertility figures are now mostly confined to tropical Africa, with only a few exceptions (such as Afghanistan and East Timor).
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populationspopulation, demographics, unit 2 population.

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Jean-Michel Crosnier's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:25 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 2016 10:52 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:58 PM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

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Singapore's Pro-Natalist Policies

"Today, it’s no longer unusual to see married couples not wanting to have any children or delaying parenthood. Regardless of big or small changes between the past and present, one thing remains constant –  the joy & bliss that are seen in the parents’ eyes. Parenthood is not without its challenges, but you can't put a price on seeing the smile on your little ones' faces."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is part of the "Maybe Baby?" campaign in Singapore designed to boost the low fertility rate in this small Southeast Asian country.  Singapore's National Night was another innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (although much more provocative than this one).

There are several countries these days that are adopting pro-natalist policies (including Denmark and their favorite travel agency); they officially encourage citizens to have more children to boost fertility rates that are below the replacement level, fearful that it will have negative social and economic impacts for their population.

 

Tag: declining populations, Singaporepopulation, demographics, unit 2 population, .

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The science of slums - Geographical

The science of slums - Geographical | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield, argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan
Seth Dixon's insight:

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 


Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:39 PM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:26 AM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:07 AM

mega cities 

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Declining Populations

Declining Populations | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."


Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:32 PM

After reading such an article, I could not understand why someone would not want to have children, especially with the incentives offered by the governments. Clearly it seems as if Denmark is the most concerned because they take up three out of five of the slots for how Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies. In general, the incentives seem to be very good, good enough for someone to want to have children. In Sweden you get 480 days out of work plus 80% of your previous salary, Denmark says if Danes were successful in conceiving a child while being on a vacation organized by the company, they were eligible to win three years of free diapers and a trip abroad and France pays families monthly allowances to their children who are younger than 20, plus discounts. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 3:01 PM

the fact that these campaigns are necessary in this age where migrants are flooding Europe and the birth rate is declining. its amazing that this is necessary, but with the birthrate declining the only other home to insure their economic system continues to function is to get the migrants working.

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 13, 2018 11:53 PM
(Europe) Europe, especially in the middle and eastern regions, faces a challenge: population decay. Europeans are having less children so the population rate is decreasing, unlike many parts of the world. In Denmark, instead of focusing only on preventing pregnancy and using contraceptives, educators mention the advantages to having children. Denmark also launched advertisements linking sex to patriotism, gives benefits to couples conceiving during vacations, and created a dating site for citizens who intend to start a family. Nearby Sweden passed a law allowing either the mother or father to be entitled to 80% of their pay for 480 days after their child's birth, eliminating some financial concerns for inability to work during childcare. In France, families with children/young adults under 20 get a monthly federal stipend and heavy discounts.
However, according the accompanying map, the projected annual growth rate of the three countries mentioned are all positive (0.00 to 0.99% growth). This may be because of the mentioned campaigns, but the article does not mention the efforts to remedy this social problem in countries marked in blue. These areas face great population problems in the next decades, and it would be interesting to understand more of their problems.
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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state


Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new data show, highlighting the demographic challenge faced by the country’s chronically sluggish economy.  National statistics office ISTAT said on Thursday the number of live births last year was 509,000, or 5,000 fewer than in 2013, rounding off half a century of decline.  The number of babies born to both natives and foreigners living in Italy dropped as immigration, which used to support the overall birth rate, tumbled to its lowest level for five years.


TagItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.

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Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:00 PM

Unit II: Population and Migration

 

As Italy becomes a highly developed country, it begins to experience a large population decline. Fertility rates are negative and continue to decline, and mortality rates are dropping as well. People are not having large families, and all of these factors contribute to the rapidly declining population of Italy. The prime minister of Italy hopes to simulate an economic and cultural recharge in hopes that this will help encourage people to make more babies so that the population does not continue to decline at this rate.

 

This relates to the demographic transition model, as Italy is in the last stage of it. Once countries are developed, fertility rates begin to slow as mortality rates continue to decline, causing a decline in the total overall population. This is clearly exemplified through this story about Italy. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:01 PM

The low birth rate in Italy is causing the country to think that its dying because there aren't enough new-born to replace the ones that passed away. As the article state, it mainly in the south where the economy is very poor and the average family is not making as much money as they should to support more children. This might lead people to migrate to other places  to find opportunities for their future generations. If Italy could find a way distribute wealth evenly across the countries they might be able to find a better result in birth rate. This is easier said than done however. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 3:44 PM

its fascinating that there may no longer be such a term as Italian outside of history books in fifty years. the low birth rate in European countries is a major concern, especially as the economies in those same countries start to suffer.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Population change is frequently a concern of city planners at the local level.  This article shows that major demographic shifts are going to mean major changes in our patterns in our cities as we become a 'greying' society. 


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, sprawlneighborhood, planning, densityplanning, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, USA.

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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

Suggested by Kara Charboneau
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America's fastest shrinking cities

America's fastest shrinking cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The U.S. population rose by just 0.72% in 2013, the lowest growth rate in more than 70 years. Not only has the country become less-attractive to immigrants than in years past, with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year, but also the U.S.'s domestic birth rate has dropped to a multi-decade low.

While the population of most of the country's metro areas grew at a low pace in recent years, in a small number of metro areas the population actually shrank. Looking at the most recent years, the U.S. population rose by just 2.4% between April 2010 and July 2013, but in 30 metro areas the population shrank by at least 1%. The population in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, fell a nation-leading 4.4% in that time. Based on recently released U.S. Census Bureau estimates, 24/7 Wall St. examined the cities with shrinking populations."

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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.


Why do commentators, like Chicken Little, treat this worldwide trend as a disaster, even collective suicide? It could be because declines in fertility rates stir anxieties about power: national, military and economic, as well as sexual. In reality, slower population growth creates enormous possibilities for human flourishing. In an era of irreversible climate change and the lingering threat from nuclear weapons, it is simply not the case that population equals power, as so many leaders have believed throughout history. Lower fertility isn’t entirely a function of rising prosperity and secularism; it is nearly universal.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This op-ed from the New York Times provides excellent material for discussing demographic issues, especially regarding declining populations.  Many countries do fear the demographic uncertainty and are actively encouraging pro-natalist policies (with salacious ads such as Singapore's National Night and a Travel agency's 'Do it for Denmark' campaign).  The author of this article though, seeks to quell those fears.    


Tag: declining populations, population, demographic transition model.

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:35 PM

Unit 2

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, October 12, 2016 8:51 AM
After reading this article, do you agree or disagree?  Remember, be specific with your arguments.
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 5, 2018 10:01 AM

How will this trend affect perspectives on population?  How will the DTM reflect these new figures?

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The changing face of Japan: labour shortage opens doors to immigrant workers

The changing face of Japan: labour shortage opens doors to immigrant workers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Japan – once one of the world’s most homogenous societies – is starting to unwind its traditional opposition to large-scale immigration
Seth Dixon's insight:

Japan is one of the closest examples of a nation-state.  And like Iceland, that is in part because the ocean historically has acted as a massive barrier to cultural diffusion and migration. Today though, modern transportation makes that barrier negligible.  Cultural attitudes have continued to not favor international immigration but their declining population has forced a change towards the end of 2018 (see any of theses five articles from Washington Post, Japanese Times, Nippon.com, the Guardian, and the Diplomat).

Japan has traditionally been one on the countries most opposed to allowing large number of migrants into their country.  The administration is still presenting themselves as tough on immigration; the 2018 policy change will allow semi-skilled workers to enter Japan for 5 years, but they cannot bring their family members with them, and they still must pass a Japanese-language exam.  These shifts are not an abandonment of policies that seek to preserve cultural homogeneity, but they are also an acknowledgement of the demographic realities and struggles of a declining population.     

Until 2018, Japanese policy only highly-skilled migrants were allowed in to Japan, with advantages given to those with Japanese ancestry.  However, these stringent migration policies coupled with Japan’s declining birth rates meant that Japan’s population was declining substantially enough to negatively impact their economy.  There were foreign workers filling in the gaps, but only 20% of those workers had functioning work visas under the old prohibitive system. This new policy is primarily aimed at replacing workers in sectors that are facing severe labor shortages, that are being classified as “semi-skilled workers.”  The law is trying to walk a fine line, trying to bring in more workers to Japan while simultaneously making it very difficult still trying to make it very tough for these workers to settle permanently in Japan. This will have a significant impact on Japanese society, and in the near future, it’s cultural institutions.   

 

GeoEd Tags: Japan, East Asia, declining population, migration.

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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What regions can you identify as a part of a trend?  What possible factors have led to these patterns?  What are the long-term implications of this data? 

 

Tags: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration. 

 

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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 1, 2018 4:35 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 2018 7:31 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 2018 2:45 AM
This article shows the population patterns of Europe between 2001 and 2011. Many cities have had a high rise in average annual population of 2 percent or more. This map also shows that there has been more migration in northwest Europe. Citizens have left certain cities in search of better job opportunities. The population in Germany is sparse except in Berlin. Spain has had a big drop in population overall. Many people living in more rural regions have moved to cities and many others are moving to coasts for retiring or downsizing.
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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

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Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 2018 1:18 PM
Population

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Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families

Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Born in Japan, Gursewak Singh considers himself Japanese. The government doesn't. But it offers children like him a chance to stay - if their parents leave.

 

Gursewak’s parents, who are Sikhs, fled to Japan from India in the 1990s. For several years, they lived without visas under the radar of the authorities until they were put on a status known as “provisional release” in 2001. It means they can stay in Japan as long as their asylum application is under review.  While there were almost 14,000 asylum cases under review at the end of 2015, Japan accepted only 27 refugees last year. The year before that, the number was 11.

The low acceptance rate stands in stark contrast to Europe, which has seen hundreds of thousands of refugees arrive from countries such as Iraq, Syria and Eritrea. In the first half of the year, European countries ruled on 495,000 asylum applications, approving more than 293,000.

 

Tags: culture, Sikhdeclining populationpopulationmigrationrefugees, JapanEast Asia,             .

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Fertility Rates-Differences Within Countries

"An important aspect about country level data of fertility to keep in mind is that there can be considerable heterogeneity within countries, which are hidden in the mean fertility which were discussed in this entry. The mean Total Fertility Rate for India in 2010 was 2.8 (UN Data): But this average hides the fact that the fertility in many Southern Indian regions was below 1.5 (which is similar to the mean fertility in many European countries), while the fertility in Northern India was still higher than 5 children per woman (which is as high as the mean of the African countries with the highest fertility)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a stunning example of uneven development and regional differences within countries.  Too often we discuss countries as if the situation inside the borders of one country is the same throughout it, even if the geographic contexts can be wildly different. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are the fertility rates in so different in northern and southern India?  How does this regional imbalance impact the country?  What are other examples of major differences within a country? 

 

Tags: regions, population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodelsunit 2 population, India, South Asia. 

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Romania’s lost generation: inside the Iron Curtain’s orphanages

Romania’s lost generation: inside the Iron Curtain’s orphanages | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Romania's Soviet-era approach to child rearing led to one of history’s most comprehensive studies on the effects of institutionalisation on young children.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past I have highlighted pro-natalist government policies (and private encouragement) such as Singapore's National Night and Denmark's "Do it for Denmark!" Those programs and policies are designed to slow down declining populations; agency, choice and the well-being of the next generation are deeply embedded into the fabric of those plans.  This horrific, historical example shows everything that could go wrong with enforced pro-natalists policies in an authoritarian government.  

 

TagsRomania, declining populations, historicalgovernance.

 

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Do it for Denmark, Take II

Spies Travel is joining forces with wannabe grandmas in the fight against Denmark's low birth rate. Introducing Spies Parent Purchase™: Send your child on an active holiday and get a grandchild.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation;  Countries like Japan are in steep decline in terms of their population.  Denmark is a country that is seeking to to encourage higher fertility rates; this travel company is using this salacious ad (as a sequel to Do it for Denmark) to promote the it and themselves, but there is some actual demographic analysis in there). Singapore's National Night was another innovative campaign to boost fertility rates, but they also have a less steamy campaign entitled "Maybe Baby?"

Tag: declining populations.

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, October 2, 2015 9:59 PM

While we struggle to reduce fertility by offering education and opportunities, in places where there IS education and opportunities, we are struggling to spice things up, for the sake of maintaining our economic prowess.  Here's one of many examples of a country trying to get people to manufacture babies. 

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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The four maps in this article highlight many of the demographic issues that are currently impacting Europe.  See also this article showing where in Europe populations are declining and where they are growing.  


TagsEurope, mapdeclining populations, population, demographic transition model, map archives

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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Japan's Disappearing Villages

Japan's Disappearing Villages | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the small town of Nagoro, population 35, one woman is trying to save her village from extinction by creating life-sized dolls for every inhabitant who either dies or moves away.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Japan has experienced rural to urban migration for decades now; simultaneously, Japan's fertility rates have dropped far below replacement level.  While Tokyo is still bustling, small villages are shrinking to the point of disappearing.  This is a haunting and yet touching tribute to these emerging ghost towns.  It seems like a memorial to enshrine a sense of place before the memory of this place is forever eradicated--like a an earthen dam .  


Tags: Japan, declining population, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asialandscape, place.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:43 PM

Due to urban migration, this village of Nagoro is said to be one of 10,000 small towns that will disappear in Japan.  I've been to some small towns in Japan and can say there is so much more culture in these villages than there is in the big cities.  I got a totally different feeling in my sole than when I ended my trip in Tokyo.  While both parts of the country have its pros and cons, it is terrible to think that these villages will be defeated to the rise of urbanism.   

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 9:01 PM

It has been estimated that in the coming years 80% of people will live within mega cities. This is that statistic unraveling before our eyes. It is really sad to me because these within these small villages is a culture that is almost like an art in its own right. It is clear to see the impacts it has on the remaining villagers.

 

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 4:38 PM

A depressing but also fascinating situation in Japan. Their Urban migration coupled by an aging population is wiping out their villages around the country. One women has even apparently been filling the village with dolls to make it seem more populated. How she got her neighbors to approve and where all the resources and money came from to pull that off who knows. However what is being witness now is a change in demographic but also one in geography since the village in 30 or so years could be reclaimed by the wilderness while the cities expand and have to cope with the influx taking away more wild land. Hopefully Japan gets this straightened out for they currently seem to be having the exact opposite demographic problem of China and India.

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Pro-Natalist Policies

"No one has found out how to help Denmark's falling birth rate. Until now. Spies Travels announces a competition where you have to make a baby to win."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation;  Countries like Japan are in steep decline in terms of their population.    Denmark is a country that is seeking to to encourage higher fertility rates (and this travel company is using this salacious ad to promote the it and themselves, but there is some actual demographic analysis in there). Singapore's National Night was another innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (warning: the video is provocative).  Russia is also trying to boost fertility rates with a similar idea, but another major part of their strategy is to reaffirm traditional sexual norms in society.  

Tag: declining populations.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:41 AM

This shows what Pro-Natalism looks like in the 21st century. Youtube videos, and competitions that can go viral and trending. I find it interesting how these policies are trying to gain traction through video campaigns with sexy models and catchy slogans like "Do it for Demark". Population geography can be a key indicator of the characteristics of a country or nation. Denmark knows they need to counter a falling birthrate in order to stay growing this is definatly a modern way of going about that.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 4, 2015 9:58 PM

Sex sells everything, even making babies!

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 10, 2015 7:03 AM

This video may be both the greatest and worst television commercial in the history of civilization. I can already imagine a do it for Rhode Island commercial airing sometime in the near future. In all seriousness, this video is aimed at an enormous issue facing Both Europe and Russia. Russia particularly, is suffering terribly. In the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Russian death rate far outpaced the Russian birth rate. The seriousness of such an issue can not be understated. A country can not survive if more people are dying, than being born. Only recently, has the birth rate caught back up to the death rate in Russia. While the death crises may be ebbing in Russia, there is no way to erase twenty years of death.

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This Fall, Minorities Will Outnumber White Students in U.S. Schools

This Fall, Minorities Will Outnumber White Students in U.S. Schools | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"While 62 percent of the total U.S. population was classified as non-Hispanic white in 2013, when public schools start this fall their racial landscape will reflect a different America."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A new report new shows the changing demographics in American education and how it differs from that of the general population.  The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  What are some of the reasons and what are some of the impacts?


Tag: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, USA.

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Linda Rutledge Hudson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 6:02 PM

Have observed the transition in our suburban school district.  I love the diversity -- yet, teaching students from all over the globe, sometimes with limited English, can be challenging.  And, our working population will eventually see the change as well -- at all levels.

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The Next America

The Next America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs.      


Tag: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, USA.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.