Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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U.S.-Mexico border: An interactive look at the barriers that divide these two countries

U.S.-Mexico border: An interactive look at the barriers that divide these two countries | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What is along the nearly 2,000 miles of border that divides the U.S. from Mexico?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map allows users to fly over the length of the U.S.-Mexico border.  At key locations you can see how the border is part of communities and an integral part of the economic and social of these cities.  Borders, while on the surface may seem to only divide, often unite people together.  All borders are semi-permeable and this interactive highlights some of the connections across this particular border that is perpetually under intense political scrutiny.   

 

GeoEd Tags: Mexico, Political, borders, North America.

Scoop.it Tags: Mexico, borders, politicalNorth America.   

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 11 February, 12:49
Political geography
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The World’s Most Economically Powerful Cities

The World’s Most Economically Powerful Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The newest ranking of the world’s most economically powerful cities put together by Martin Prosperity Institute (MPI) research team finds New York to be the clear winner [over London]. Our Global City Economic Power Index  is based on five core metrics: Overall Economic Clout, Financial Power, Global Competitiveness,

Equity and Quality of Life." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

100 years ago, the biggest trends in urbanization showed that the biggest cities in the world were also the most economically powerful cities in the world in core areas.  In the last 50 years, the most obvious change has been the remarkable growth in of the world’s largest cities in the developing world.   

Questions to Ponder: Why has there been such spectacular growth of megacities, especially in the developing world?  How is this map ranking global cities different from a list of the world’s largest cities?  What regional patterns do exist in the 25 most economically powerful cities in the world?  What are the implications of these patterns?    

 

Tags: urban, megacities, regions.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, 28 May 2018, 17:07
And the winner is: coastal cities.
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, 5 September 2018, 21:32
In this article it states the most economically powerful cities. From New York to London they are both powerhouse cities in music, finance and fashion. Even though London lost its run after decades it is still the most economically powerful city since 2012. Tokyo, being the 3rd largest economically powerful city is the worlds largest metro economy. And from Hong Kong (4th city) to Toronto we can see that the world is getting more and more powerful in the economy.
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Finding North America’s lost medieval city

Finding North America’s lost medieval city | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Cahokia was North America's biggest city—then it was completely abandoned. I went there to find out why.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The earthen mounds of Cahokia on the flat flood plains must have been the most awe-inspiring demonstration of political power and economic wealth in its day.  Like so many other civilizations before them (and many more in the future?), Cahokia probably declined from too many environmental modifications that led to unforeseen consequences.

 

Tagsurban ecology, indigenousenvironment, environment modify, historical, North America.

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James Piccolino's curator insight, 31 January 2018, 22:54
Why have I never heard of this? This is too interesting to have somehow just passed most of us by. The entire time I was reading this, I was hoping that they would offer an image of what the site looks like today, and luckily they did. As a history lover there has always been something so amazing about being able to compare historical sites in their prime vs what they are like now. I tend to look up locations of historic places after, say watching a tv show based there, for this same reason. To think this all was hidden under an old drive in movie theater, it's a little crazy, but then again that is what makes this sort of thing so interesting.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, 9 February 2018, 18:25
(North America) The common view of Native Americans involve nomads and small villages in the north and technologically advanced cities in Mexico. However, the largest Native American settlement was in modern day Illinois. At the time, Cahokia had a greater population than Paris or London and had huge intricate mounds, plazas, agricultural centers, and, most importantly, places of ritual worship. It's amazing how archaeologists can piece together so much of day to day life. Rooms with bones and pottery are discovered to be centuries old feasting rooms, a place with distinct pottery and mats is deemed to be a ritual burning ground. The fact that the workers can tell if objects were imported from other villages or how fast the city was built allows the ancient Americans to communicate with us over 600 hundred years later, especially on their religious beliefs of the Upper and Under Worlds. Not only are the archaeologists able to see daily life, they can see the changing history of the city through different housing patterns further below the soil.
David Stiger's curator insight, 7 September 2018, 01:59
It is a shame that probably not enough residents of the United States are aware that this wondrous city ever existed. People recognize the name "Manchu Picchu" but not Cahokia. Why is that the case in our American culture? The article reports that this city has been under serious excavation since the 1970s. Cahokia is a First Nations example of highly advanced civilization - something that even overtook medieval European civilization when the city was in its prime (1200 BCE). The hegemonic narrative of white, patriarchal supremacy - a view that is characterized as 'Eurocentric' - still dominates our culture and prevents stories like these from impacting and shaping how Americans view history. This is important because Cahokia is further evidence that no European ever introduced civilization to the First Nations. More accurately stated, Europeans introduced a different kind of civilization to the Indigenous Peoples implying a sense of equality and humanness. The resulting genocide of the First Nations by white Americans is even harder to justify and ignore because "savages" do not build magnificent cities based on complex systems of religion, spirituality, politics, and artistic expression. 
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Clinton would have won if the United States looked like the top map

Clinton would have won if the United States looked like the top map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you tell what’s wrong with this map of the United States? I’ll give you a hint: Look near the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. Spot the problem yet? A further hint: Look at the border of Wisconsin and Illinois as well as the Florida Panhandle. See it now? The Wisconsin-Illinois border is slightly more southern and the Florida Panhandle is slightly shorter.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This mapping application is my favorite discovery after the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.  The election was obviously very contentious and incredibly close, both in regard to the popular vote as well as the Electoral College.  Using this mapping application, you can re-divide the states of the union by shifting the counties around.  Using the voting patterns based on the county-level data, you can see how your proposed divisions would have impacted the 2016 presidential election. 

There have been many plans on how to divide the 50 states into various regional configurations (50 states of equal population, regions of economic interactions, cultural regions, and the Nine Nations of America), and this is another iteration of that age-old theme. While this isn’t an activity in gerrymandering in the strictest sense (this is not reapportioning within the state based on population change but between states), it shows just how gerrymandering works.  It takes 270 electoral votes to win the presidency, but you could make it a landslide (in either direction) if you manipulate the current state borders.  The highest electoral vote I could engineer for Donald Trump was 407, and the highest electoral total I could manufacture for Hillary Clinton was 402.  The point of this is to show that the balance within and among states can be far more delicate than we might presume.  Just a line here or a line there can dramatically alter the balance of power.        

Activity #1: Try to make this a landslide victory for the Republican Party.  How many electoral votes could you garner for the Republicans? Add a screenshot.

Activity #2: Try to make this a landslide victory for the Democratic Party.  How many electoral votes could you garner for the Democrats? Add a screenshot.

Activity #3: Try to tip the election to the Democrats with the most subtle, minor changes that might go under the radar. Explain your changes to the state map.  Add a screenshot.   

 

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political, regionsNorth America.

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Corey Rogers's curator insight, 13 December 2018, 21:14
The electoral college is such a mess that it shouldn't be relied on for figuring out the President. With the misrepresentation of the map and the continuous gerrymandering the United States should use the popular vote category instead of the Electoral College. 
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Remembering September 11th

"Video and Photographs of the event. All media is from the internet and not my own. I compiled all media from the internet and edited them together to tell the story of the deadliest attack on America."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The compilation above was created by a teacher who realized that now none of his students were alive to remember how emotional it was for people to watch the horrific news unfold.  Additionally, this video of how Canadians helped the U.S. paired with this lesson plan from the Choices Program will help students explore the human dimension of the September 11 attacks as will this lesson from Teaching History. For a geospatial perspective on 9/11, this page from the Library of Congress, hosted by the Geography and Map Division is a visually rich resources (aerial photography, thermal imagery, LiDAR, etc.)  that show the extent of the damage and the physical change to the region that the terrorist attacks brought.  The images from that day are a part of American memory and change how the event is remembered and memorialized in public spaces (if you want a touching story of heroism, the Red Bandana is moving). 

 
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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, 11 September 2016, 04:16
Because many students were not born when 9/11 occurred, or don't remember, it is important to have sources like this available.  Take a moment and look at this information about this time in U.S. history.
James Piccolino's curator insight, 31 January 2018, 23:20
I was only between 4 and 5 years old on September 11 2001. I admittedly do have trouble recalling that day. I seem to remember having my kindergarten class cancelled for that day as I was in the afternoon class, but I did not know why. By what my father has told me, many people thought the world was coming to an end. He told me his experience of that day when I was young but still long after the event, and he told me with a level of emotion that I never saw him speak with of anything else. What fear my father had, and the world had on that day, stuck with me after I had heard it. I do vaguely remember visiting the site somewhere around 2003 or 2004 I believe. What I saw was not the beautiful memorial site there is today, but a collection of chain link fencing and concrete. The fences were covered with memorials, flowers, pictures and papers. This video, accompanied with that sadly fitting piano rendition of Mad World, reminds me of what I almost was too young to know. This combined with the realization that as of this month there are adults who were born in the 2000's brings the realization that there are people who may not be able to "never forget" what they never knew. This is why it is important to always educate young people on the past, of dangers, of terrorism, and where they have brought us to now.
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Old Mexico lives on

Old Mexico lives on | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On February 2nd 1848, following a short and one-sided war, Mexico agreed to cede more than half its territory to the United States. An area covering most of present-day Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah, plus parts of several other states, was handed over to gringolandia. The rebellious state of Tejas, which had declared its independence from Mexico in 1836, was recognised as American soil too. But a century and a half later, communities have proved more durable than borders. The counties with the highest concentration of Mexicans (as defined by ethnicity, rather than citizenship) overlap closely with the area that belonged to Mexico before the great gringo land-grab of 1848. Some are recent arrivals; others trace their roots to long before the map was redrawn. They didn’t jump the border—it jumped them.

 

Tags: culture, demographics, North Americahistorical, colonialism, borders, political.

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, 10 August 2017, 11:51
I say it all the time, culture does not respect boarders. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, 10 February 2018, 01:15
Up until 170 years ago, a large portion of what is now the United States was actually controlled by Mexico.  Remarkably, this is still reflected in the ethnic makeup of the population of that area, which covers all or part of 8 states (all of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, and part of Colorado and Wyoming).  Political borders may determine citizenship, but they are by no means a hard division of ethnicity or culture.
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Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps

Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Parag Khanna argues that these five maps are critical to understand the world we live in.

 

Maps shape how we see the world.  But most of the maps hanging on our walls are dangerously incomplete because they emphasize political borders rather than functional connections.

Seth Dixon's insight:

These 5 maps in this article are a sneak peek preview from the new book Connectography by Parag Khanna.  These maps all highlight interactions across political borders which is Khanna's big thesis.  For example, the map above emphasizes political, economic, and environmental linkages of NAFTA and minimizes the national divisions.    

 

Tags: regionsNorth Americamap, map archive.

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David Stiger's curator insight, 7 September 2018, 02:51
It is highly doubtful President Trump read anything remotely similar to this piece. The maps fully embrace the brave new world of globalized trade, politics, and cooperation - something that is at odds with "America first" chants for isolation. China appears to be ready to take the lead in this new globalized order as it focuses on massive multi-continental infrastructure projects to increase its trading capabilities. It's also interesting to think of Canada as a greater potential partner than before because of all the various connections via transportation and communication. Canada could produce a majority of our food supply as climate change dries the world over. This article is clearly saying that geopolitical change is coming and that the leadership of the U.S. would be wise to have a plan. The only part of this article that raised eyebrows was the reorganization of the United States from 50 states to 7 regions with each region centered around a major city. Essentially it sounds like seven colossal states. The idea has potential but our adversaries, like Russia, also want to see the U.S. break apart into several regions; divide and conquer is a time tested strategy. 
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The North American City

Geography of the United States & Canada


Tags: urban, prezi, planning, urbanism, architecture, North America.

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Why Americans should care about the Canadian election

Why Americans should care about the Canadian election | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The close race comes after a decade of leadership by Stephen Harper, whose relationship with Barack Obama has suffered. But a victory for Justin Trudeau and the Liberals on Monday could help the US and Canada forge renewed ties
Seth Dixon's insight:

Last night the Liberals in Canada had a resounding victory...this will profoundly impact Canadian politics but also will change some of the frostiness in U.S.-Canadian relations.  Trudeau was stated that Canada will return to its old role in the world by reversing many of the conservative stances of the Harper government instituted over these last 10 years. 

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, 9 November 2015, 20:12

As Americans, we often forget about how major a player Canada is in all of our economic sectors. But, despite the ignorance of most American citizens on Canadian politics, the results of the coming election in Canada will have a major impact on the lives of every US citizen in the next few years (at least until the next US presidential election).

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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.


The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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David Stiger's curator insight, 12 September 2018, 17:24
Thanks to advancements in technology and dedicated researchers who often forgo glory and fame, Americans are now aware of another impending natural disaster that is likely to ruin the lives of so many of our fellow citizens. This article reminded me of the impending doom of climate change and the resulting ecocide. So many of us, even people who put faith in religion, trust scientific discovery enough to acknowledge that these are realities we face as a society. Not all of us are totally brainwashed to dismiss this a secular, liberal hoax. Despite this awareness, not much - if anything - is being done to address or prepare for the awaiting earthquake and tsunami. This fact affirms that the United States' population is largely out-of-touch with reality. In a fantasy world, like ours, we are too special and superior (perhaps chosen by destiny or God) to suffer such a drastic and radically dreadful experience of nature. The delusion prevents us from acting sooner, rather than later. What comes to mind is the Netherlands as they train their population and renovate their urban centers to flow with the tides of climate change. They have the knowledge (like we do) but the difference is they have embraced it and in a communal way have decided to take action. These Europeans are adapting to their situation. This sheds light on the irony of the United States; a powerful, resource rich, skilled, and highly capable country that is falling a part because of what? Greed for wealth? Selfishness? Dare-I-say foolishness? Maybe it is indifference in an age of modernity - devoid of true human connection but full of technological bliss and distraction?  Add the Cascadia subduction zone to modernity's doom list now including unsustainable wealth inequality, overextended military policies, climate change complacency/denial, mass incarceration, obesity, mass shootings, a post-fact world, and an Opioid health epidemic. These are BIG problems that need bold strokes. Simply put, many people with wealth and power do not feel a connection to their countrymen and countrywomen to allow a government - acting on behalf of the masses - to do something. And, that is a key link. Businesses seeking to make a profit do not want regulations and adaptation to interfere. The cost of addressing these problems is a potential loss of money-making as consumers modify their behavior and new policies require more funding through taxes. 

As this article relates to geography and my aforementioned class-warfare rant: the Earth is indisputably a complex planetary system that has always been totally indifferent to human wants and needs. The planet has no obligation or will to act in our best human interests. We, as a people, must respond to the planet. When it shakes, we must brace or move. In other words, we must take action or experience the consequences of inaction. Crony capitalism, excessive wealth, and a government held hostage by corporate interests which prioritize profit over people are serious hurtles. The wealthy and powerful should realize that they need US - the 90% of people that lack significant amounts of disposable income. 90% is a large chunk of civilization! There is no wealth and prosperity if there is no healthy civilization on which to build a business or exercise entrepreneurial abilities. It is time to confront greed by recognizing our collective humanity - a humanity shaped and informed by geographically determined experiences. 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, 30 September 2018, 00:48
An insightful and honestly, scary article. Discussing the inevitable earthquake that would devastate the pacific northwest, but not knowing when it could occur makes me never want to even visit. The Cascadia earthquake which could or more likely would send a tsunami straight into Oregon. Learning from the Seaside, Oregon superintendent that three of the four schools under his charge will go from five to fifteen feet above sea level to as much as forty-five below would shake anyone to their core. So what has the state done to remedy this? Nothing, unfortunately. With no Early-warning system, he describes how one elementary school will be trapped, as they will have no escape. With the growing ocean waters on one side and a roadless bog on the other, these students have nowhere safe to go. This reminds me of the question, would you rather know how you will die or when you will die? Waiting with no clue when the impending doom will occur until it happens is too much for me. I recommend get out now and get out quick unless the state figures out a warning system, then just get out quick.
 
Corey Rogers's curator insight, 14 December 2018, 04:00
Yes, we have some serious earthquakes on the San Andres fault and in Japan but we're overlooking the one along the  Pacific Northwest. An out roar has to be made for people to be more notified of the Cascadia subduction zone, so people can prepare for tragedy. We need to realize that the way these plates move can make a major ripple effect on our way of life. 
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Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."


TagsCanada, map, North America, weather and climate.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, 17 September 2015, 13:51

Canada is large relatively uninhabitable country. Most of the nation is basically barren frozen wilderness. This article shows the key point that climate plays in the question of where humans decided to live. Warm and temperate climates traditionally attract the most people. Know one wants to live with polar bears. While their are many geographic factors to were people live, climate may be the most important.

James Piccolino's curator insight, 31 January 2018, 23:28
I almost feel bad about complaining of the temperatures here in Rhode Island. I also have to call attention to the fact that the article calls -26 degrees bearable! I always figured the image of roaming moose and deep snow all over the place was just a bit of a stereotype of a vast geographically diverse country. After seeing this map, I can say that I believe it for the most part now.  
tyrone perry's curator insight, 4 February 2018, 13:52
I feel a lot of people look at Canada and think that it is this enormous country with a huge population, but they don't realize how much of the country is inhabitable.  Vegetation is important to live.  Canada has many extreme cold temperature zones.  these zones range from 3.9c to 56.7c.  The higher it goes the less inhabitable it gets.  I myself never realized how cold it was in the lower part of Canada.  That's way to cold for me. 
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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  


Tags: manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, 2 February 2015, 23:49

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, 14 March 2016, 23:43

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, 5 September 2018, 22:02
Over the years the United States has shown a number of leading employer industries. In the 1990"s the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most United States, followed by Retail Trade industries. In 2003, Retail Trade was the leading employer, but by 2013 health Care and Social Assistance was dominant industries in 34 States. From the 1990"s to 2013 employment has been on a steady decline while Health Care and Social Assistance became largest industries in New York (1992) and North Dakota (1995).
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The Next America

The Next America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs.      


Tag: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, USA.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, 25 April 2014, 14:35

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, 18 September 2014, 15:46
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, 18 September 2014, 15:48

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

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Here's How America Uses Its Land

Here's How America Uses Its Land | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 48 contiguous states alone are a 1.9 billion-acre jigsaw puzzle of cities, farms, forests and pastures.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of 15 maps on how land is used in the 48 contiguous U.S. states is a phenomenal resource to visualize how we use our land (admittedly this does exclude Alaska and Hawaii, but given that Alaska's land use patterns can skew the patterns considerably).  This is especially useful in agricultural units, but has many other applications. 

Scoop.it Tags: agriculture, food production, land userural, USA.

WordPress TAGS: agriculture, food production, land use, rural, USA.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, 5 October 2018, 14:11
Good for map analysis practice
K Rome's curator insight, 7 October 2018, 00:36

This set of 15 maps on how land is used in the 48 contiguous U.S. states is a phenomenal resource to visualize how we use our land (admittedly this does exclude Alaska and Hawaii, but given that Alaska's land use patterns can skew the patterns considerably).  This is especially useful in agricultural units, but has many other applications. 

Scoop.it Tags: agriculture, food production, land userural, USA.

WordPress TAGS: agriculture, food production, land use, rural, USA.

Ivan Valles's curator insight, 5 March, 04:06
Forthcoming comments....
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50% of the Canadian population lives in these counties

50% of the Canadian population lives in these counties | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I was inspired by 50% of the U.S. lives in these counties. map. I was wondering what the equivalent map for Canada would look like. I couldn't find one, so I created my own."

Seth Dixon's insight:

During the U.S. presidential election much was made about the differences between rural and urban regions of the United States.  Clearly the United States isn't the only North American country that has a highly clustered population distribution. 

 

Question to Ponder: How does this basic demographic reality impact Canadian politics, policies, infrastucture, culture, etc.?

 

TagsCanadamap, North America, population, density.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, 23 March 2017, 21:35
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, 26 January 2018, 00:38
This post is particularly interesting because it shows just how the population is impacted by the geography of the land. Like most civilizations, fifty percent of Canada's population is centered around waterways, an excellent resource for trade and communication to the bordering nation. 
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Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later

Nine Nations of North America, 30 Years Later | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Back in the ’70s, almost a hundred reporters around the country – Washington Post bureau chiefs, rovers, freelancers and me, their desk-bound editor – were trying to get our arms around how North America worked, really. Not how it should work. But how it did work. Forget those nice neat rectangles in the middle of the U.S. Let’s be real: The mountains of western Colorado are totally alien from the wheat fields of eastern Colorado. And Miami is part not of Florida, but its own watery Caribbean realm. And what a terrible idea is 'California.' It behaves as if it covers three warring civilizations. The result was my 1981 book, 'The Nine Nations of North America.' The reader reaction was astonishing. This map – drawn to anticipate the news – revealed something much deeper. It turned out to be a map of culture and values, which have nothing to do with our perversely drawn state and national boundaries."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Question to Ponder: How would you divide up North America?  What would be some differences from this map?  What reasons do you have for making these different regional groupings?  What are the main criteria for what constitutes a region?

 

Tags: regionsNorth America.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 18 December 2016, 04:56

An interesting look at settlement patterns in the USA if using this to compare with spatial patterns in Australia. A deeper examination will reveal reasons for differences in settlement patterns between the two nations. 

 

Syllabus

Students investigate differences in urban settlement patterns between Australia and another country, for example: 

  • examination of urban settlements to determine patterns of concentration 
  • explanation of factors influencing urban concentration eg climate and topography, transportation networks, land use or perceptions of liveability
  • assessment of the consequences of urban concentrations on the characteristics, liveability and sustainability of places

Geoworld 9 NSW

Chapter 7: Urban settlement patterns Australia and the USA

7.1 Population concentrated near coasts

7.2 Urbanisation of indigenous populations

7.3 Is Australia a nation of tribes?

7.4 Nature in control

7.5 Coastal colonial cities and ports

7.6 USA: Settlement, geography and history

7.7 Large cities: Contrasting patterns

7.8 Sprawling suburbs: similar patterns

7.9 Consequences of urban concentration 

Geothink Activities 3 and  4. 

Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, 26 January 2018, 00:46
Because of its sheer size and perfect geographical location, America is nearly impossible to place into specific regions.   This map, however, shows much more about the country than the typical regions named after the cardinal directions. By categorizing the country that way there are assumptions made about culture. In this map, I see that as well, but it has divided states which can ( and should) be categorized as more than one region. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, 8 February 2018, 03:49
This article is fascinating how the author depicts the nine nations from then till now.  most things are perceived relatively the same thru out the course of time.  the map definitely shows how the nine nations are completely different from each other and what they are known for.  even to this day we look at them no different now.  no matter how many times people move they adapt to that area and that area stays the same.
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Cahokia – why did North America's largest city vanish?

Cahokia – why did North America's largest city vanish? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Long before Columbus reached the Americas, Cahokia was the biggest, most cosmopolitan city north of Mexico. Yet by 1350 it had been deserted by its native inhabitants the Mississippians – and no one is sure why
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is the eighth in the "Lost Cities" series (Babylon, Troy, Pompeii, Angkor, Fordlandia, etc.).  The earthen mounds of Cahokia on the flat flood plains must have been the most awe-inspiring demonstration of political power and economic wealth in its day.  Like so many other civilizations before them (and many more in the future?), Cahokia probably declined from too many environmental modifications that led to unforeseen consequences.

 

Tagsurban ecology, indigenousenvironment, environment modify, historical, North America.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 29 September 2016, 01:55

A great example of the importance of environmental quality to liveability 

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, 30 September 2016, 03:32

This article is the eighth in the "Lost Cities" series (Babylon, Troy, Pompeii, Angkor, Fordlandia, etc.).  The earthen mounds of Cahokia on the flat flood plains must have been the most awe-inspiring demonstration of political power and economic wealth in its day.  Like so many other civilizations before them (and many more in the future?), Cahokia probably declined from too many environmental modifications that led to unforeseen consequences.

 

Tagsurban ecology, indigenousenvironment, environment modify, historical, North America.

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When Mexico Was Flooded By Immigrants

When Mexico Was Flooded By Immigrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the early nineteenth-century, Mexico had a problem with American immigrants.
Seth Dixon's insight:
A century and a half ago, the immigration debate and geopolitical shifts in power on the United States-Mexico border reflected a profoundly different dynamic than it does today.  This history has enduring cultural impacts on southwestern states that had the international border jump them.

 

Tags: culture, demographicsmigration, North Americahistorical, colonialism, borders, political.

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, 10 August 2017, 12:02
Seth Dixon's insight: A century and a half ago, the immigration debate and geopolitical shifts in power on the United States-Mexico border reflected a profoundly different dynamic than it does today. This history has enduring cultural impacts on southwestern states that had the international border jump them.
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Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation.

Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The area below the red line includes most of Nova Scotia, in Canada's east, but most of the population comes from the area a little farther west, in a sliver of Quebec and a densely populated stretch of Ontario near the Great Lakes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Admitted, the web Mercator projection of this map distorts the far northern territories of Canada, but still it hammers home some fascinating truths about Canada's population distribution.  Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  

 

TagsCanada, map, North America, population, density.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, 4 June 2016, 15:27
This article highlights the geographic concept of Spatial Significance
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 4 June 2016, 22:13

Factors influencing settlement patterns - concentrations of population 

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$75 a day vs. $75,000 a year: How we lost jobs to Mexico

$75 a day vs. $75,000 a year: How we lost jobs to Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A college-educated, manufacturing engineer makes $1,500 a month working the production line at a GE plant in Mexico (about $75 a day). A typical manufacturing engineer that works for GE in the United States makes nearly $75,000 a year, (about $312 a day ... or 4X the rate in Mexico).  That wage gap can easily explain why so many manufacturing jobs have left the United States. Since 2000, the U.S. has lost about 5 million manufacturing jobs.  Manufacturing has crossed the Rubicon -- or Rio Grande -- and it's hard to see those jobs returning to the U.S."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industrymanufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexicoglobalization, technology.  

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Leonardo Wild's curator insight, 4 April 2016, 14:35

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, 4 April 2016, 20:16

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, 5 April 2016, 02:00

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

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Half of Canada’s population

Half of Canada’s population | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Half of Canada’s 33.5 million people live in the red part, the other in the yellow. More population divided maps (Source: reddit.com)"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  


TagsCanada, map, North America.

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JeanneSilvey's curator insight, 17 November 2015, 15:09

A great illustration of population concentration and high density in Urban centers. 4.6 million of the remaining 17 million (approx.) live in British Columbia.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, 17 November 2015, 16:41

First economically for trade routes you have the St. Lawrence river which was originally the most influential route for French explorers. You have Toronto the Canada's financial center which forms the core of the "Golden Horseshoe" region, which wraps around the western end of Lake Ontario, population wise a quarter of Canada's population lives here.  Politically it makes sense that government would be set up in that area because of the population in that area.  Which population leads to the social aspect because all activities of night life, restaurants, businesses, entertainment, malls, etc. are located in this area.  And lastly, it makes easy access for United States and Canada to exchange tourism and jobs and goods.

Corey Rogers's curator insight, 13 December 2018, 18:49
It's crazy to think how big Canada is and yet the majority of the population lives right on the border. Canada is almost in the Arctic Circle so most of the time you're going to have frigid temperatures and inhabitable land so its going to push people closer to the equator. 
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Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa)

Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After World War I, Canada drew up classified plans to invade the U.S. Meanwhile, the U.S. had its own secret plot to create the "United States of North America."
Seth Dixon's insight:

I never knew 1921 to 1930 was such a frosty time in Canadian-U.S. relations that BOTH sides drew up possible invasion plans.  Judging by these amazing arrows, these plans were never seriously about to be executed, but it is a good reminder that geopolitical partnerships (and rivalries) are ever-changing.  Today, if there are border tensions between these two allies, it might just center around the Arctic as it's geopolitical importance is rising, but the U.S. doesn't have a very successful track record against Canada.  Also, I did enjoy the 1920s reference that Americans simply assumed that Canada (once the British Empire was dismantled) would naturally be absorbed by the United States. 


TagsCanada, geopoliticspolitical, war.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, 19 September 2015, 04:30

adicionar sua visão ...

tyrone perry's curator insight, 26 January 2018, 00:31
Both the U.S. and Canada had a similar thought process with the "just in case" clause if either of the two became enemies.  both countries had their "scouts" look of the geography of each country and speak to locals to see where they stood, to find precise locations where they could attack and control.  Each location had plans to destroy infrastructures and bridges to allow time to either escape or control depending on how the situation played out.  It was both crazy and smart by the two nations to do their research with in their perspective locations to validate their attacks.   
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, 30 September 2018, 01:15
"Can I copy your homework?" "Sure just change it a little so it doesn't look obvious." After the first world war, Britain ended up owing the United States approximately $22 million leading to huge disagreements over payment. As such in a sibling-style rivalry, Canada and the United States both drafted invasion plans which were almost identical. While Canada would send forces down to attack Seattle, Portland, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Albany among others, the US would send troop north from the same cities to take Vancouver, Winnipeg, Quebec, and Montreal. It seems like it would be totally impossible now with Canada and US being such powerful allies but with the growing tensions between Trump and Trudeau who knows what could happen. If you are questioning who would win though? I would I would put my money on the 46-year-old Justin Trudeau being able to trump the 72-year-old Donald Trump.
 
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Non-Native American Nations Control over North America

Non-Native American Nations Control over North America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Above is a still image of this intriguing animated GIF; it is a great teaching resource on the colonial claims in North America and the current political alignment on the continent. 


Tags: North Americahistorical, colonialism, borders, political.

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Alex Lewis's curator insight, 6 April 2015, 15:00

This animated photo shows the progression of the different nations in control of North America. The development of the U.S. is also depicted on here, as they went from mostly European control to independence. While the U.S. controlled most of what is now America, you can recognize the Civil War period by the control of Confederate States. 

 

                                        -A.L.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, 8 April 2015, 18:33

Wow. As a history major, I found this map timeline really interesting and really cool. It's a great example of how even though the physical geography of a place can remain the same, its political and economic geography can change so rapidly (or not so rapidly). It was especially interesting to see the brief stints that entities such as the Republic of the Rio Grande or the Confederate States of America did in the dividing up of North America over the last two and a half centuries. For someone who knows nothing about U.S. history, those blips on the radar beg the question, "what happened there?" How can a political entity encompass a geographic region and then disappear just as quickly?

 

And that ties into what I think this map is really about: colonialism. This map says a great deal about how European (or Western) empires carved up the New World and what some of their political or economic goals were in the times that the map shows. It's also important to note the title of the map: "Non-Native American Nations Control over North America". So as we see the map changing to show European or United States expansion, what we DON'T see is the gradual loss of land experienced by the various Native American tribes that inhabited the continent long before Europeans ever laid eyes on it. This map, therefore, highlights how political and economic geography can change so drastically when groups with a lot of economic, political, and military power are at odds with groups who are severely disadvantaged in these areas. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, 17 September 2015, 14:00

This map is an excellent resource in show the evolution of colonial claims to North America.. It is fascinating to watch all the political changes that have occurred on the continent in over the past 500 years. The biggest change is the evolutions of the United Sates from a small city state like nation to an empire on both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. This is also an extremely sad story to be told from this map. The loss and destruction of Native Americans is next to slavery is  the greatest sin of America. This map tells the complex story of our Continent.  

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Local Shifts in Labor Demand

Local Shifts in Labor Demand | Geography Education | Scoop.it


"Daily oil production in the Bakken is approaching one million barrels per day, placing it in an elite group of only ten super-giant oil fields in the world that have ever produced that much oil at peak production. In total, nearly one billion barrels of oil have now been produced in the Bakken oil fields, and all of that oil production and related activities have brought the unemployment rate in the Williston area down to below 1% in most months over the last three years. For the most recent month – April – the jobless rate here was 0.9%."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As an oil boom has transformed North Dakota, the influx of oil workers has changed all the sectors of the local economy.  Agriculture has historically been the #1 economic contributor in the region, but huge piles of grain aren't be shipped to the market, as oil by rail is much more profitable.   

Questions to Ponder: Why is WalMart offering such high wages in North Dakota?  What local factors impact the prevailing wage rate?  What does this tell us about places with low wages?  How does the oil industry impact all the others in the region?     


Tags: manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, 28 January 2015, 16:38

this is great for the economy of not only this area, i hope this sustained income trickles throughout the United States. the Bakken Oil Fields in North Dakota are grabbing around 1 million barrels of oil per day. it sounds crazy and it really is. this super production of oil has brought down unemployment in this area to 1%. This booming production of oil has also raised wages all over the state, and in return basically has made a cult minimum wage. if Walmart tried to use the state minimum of $7.25 then nobody would want to work at the said Walmart. Walmart must accurately pay their employees to keep them. it is now a competition for workers rather than workers competing for jobs in North Dakota.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, 4 February 2015, 23:31

Its crazy but understandable that the oil boom is having an effect on everything in the local economy, even the wages at store like Walmart.  If these are the prices being offered at Walmart, i'm sure other jobs in the area are paying well also.  On top of that, i'm almost positive that the cost of living here is also high.  But I don't care how much these jobs are paying...Your not going to find me moving to the Dakotas!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, 9 September 2015, 19:32

Wages for companies are like everything in the economy based on supply and demand. Walmart currently has a large supply of jobs in a region where job demand is low, or vice versa. Either way for Walmart needs to increase their hourly pay in order to compete in the job market and appeal to the employees they are looking for. In Rhode Island where our unemployment rate is so high there is  huge supply of workers and a lesser demand for workers. In this scenario a corporation such as Walmart does not need to compete for workers they are in a sense disposal and in excess, therefor even only paying minimum wage  they know they will have no problem finding employees.

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps produced by the Pew Research Center. Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the rise, but maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a flow of immigrant coming from south of the border.  The reality is that migration from Mexico to the United States has steadily dropped since 1999.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mappingcensus, ethnicity.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, 4 February 2015, 23:56

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, 5 February 2015, 19:12

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, 16 September 2015, 18:03

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.