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Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying.

Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Madagascar, the booming charcoal business is contributing to deforestation and may exacerbate the effects of global warming.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Deforestation does not happen in a vacuum--it occurs in an economic, political, and historical context.  Rural Africans have less access to high value commodities and converting forests into charcoal is one of the few options (similar to the issue in Haiti).  The short-term economic gain for a few individuals leads to long-term environmental problems such as soil erosion, flooding, and habitat destruction for many species.  

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, poverty, development, economic, labor, Madagascar, erosionAfrica, resourcespolitical ecology.

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Launceston College Geography's curator insight, June 13, 2017 9:51 PM

Deforestation drivers

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 9, 2017 9:41 AM
If we know that furthering education and economic opportunities will help alleviate the problems present here, why aren't we as a planet seeing that they are implemented? 
brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 2018 10:23 PM
Charcoal has become the unlikely hero of the informal economy of Africa. This is a positive for the economy. However, this is not a positive for the environment. Deforestation has become a large issue since the boom of more people using charcoal. This will speed up the issue of climate change. This post shows the negative and positives a product can have involving geography.
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"Earth" Time Lapse View from Space

"Time lapse sequences of photographs taken by Ron Garan http://fragileoasis.org/bloggernauts/Astro_Ron and the crew of expedition 28 & 29 onboard the International Space Station from August to October, 2011..."


Shooting locations by order of appearance:

1. United States, Eastern United States
2. Madagascar to southwest of Australia, South of Australia
3. NW coast of United States to Central South America
4.  Southern to the Northern Pacific Ocean
5. Central Africa and the Middle East
6. Sahara Desert and the Middle East
7. Canada and Central United States
8. Pass over Southern California to Hudson Bay
9. Islands in the Philippine Sea
10. Eastern Asia to Philippine Sea and Guam
11. Middle East, Mediterranean Sea
12. United States, Indian Ocean
13. Eastern Europe to SE Asia

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Seth Dixon's comment, November 15, 2011 2:49 PM
Shooting locations by order of appearance:

1. United States, Eastern United States
2. Madagascar to southwest of Australia, South of Australia
3. NW coast of United States to Central South America
4. Southern to the Northern Pacific Ocean
5. Central Africa and the Middle East
6. Sahara Desert and the Middle East
7. Canada and Central United States
8. Pass over Southern California to Hudson Bay
9. Islands in the Philippine Sea
10. Eastern Asia to Philippine Sea and Guam
11. Middle East, Mediterranean Sea
12. United States, Indian Ocean
13. Eastern Europe to SE Asia
Maria la del Varrio's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:47 PM

It is amazing to see how humans have changed the look of our planet from space with all the electric lights.

 

In this video you will see a time lapse of our planet, mostly electric storm and night scenes.

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What are Lavakas?

What are Lavakas? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The word lavaka means 'hole' or 'gully' in Malagasy, and it has become the accepted international term for the spectacular erosional features that characterize the highlands of Madagscar. Lavakas are gullies formed by groundwater flow, with steep or vertical sides and flat floors."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Lavakas are often seen as an ecological catastrophe since rapid deforestion leads to young, active lavakas that can silt up rice fields.  While obviously not desirable, these scars on a deforested landscape do offer a glimmer of hope as well. Some National Geographic explorers are finding that older, stabilized lavakas can become great agricultural pockets for rebuilding in these denuded communities.

 

Tags: Madagascar, erosion, environment adapt,  environmentecology, political ecology, Africa, National Geographic.

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