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Crafting a Sense of Place

Crafting a Sense of Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Talk about creating a sense of place! This neighborhood in #Covington draws on German roots to create a restaurant/pub district. Even the non-German restaurants in the area evoke an old world cultural landscape aesthetic in a way that makes the neighborhood appealing to visitors and prospective residents. #culturallandscape #placemaking."

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love exploring the cultural landscapes in and around Cincinnati every year during the #APHGreading.   

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscapeurban, place, social media, APHG, Cincinnati

 

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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've discussed Cincinnati's gentrification several times here, but this video adds the personal touch where you can see into the mind, ethos and motives of those moving in to poorer neighborhoods with hopes to renovate a community where the logic of 'disinvestment' has prevailed for decades.  Gentrification is often criticized for displacing the urban poor, but this shows how some are eager to tie themselves into the fabric of the neighborhood as the neighborhood is changing; they aren't just wealthy people buying out the poor. 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

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Hailey Austin's curator insight, May 11, 2017 2:34 PM
 This is related to what I'm learning in class because its talking about urbanization. It talks about how a man visits a very run down place and invest in fixing it up a bit. He rebuilt a house/building. It made the city look better. My opinion on the article is that its a very good deed. Bringing a city back to life is a wonderful thing. 
Harley Bass's curator insight, May 11, 2017 2:35 PM
This connects to are lesson on chapter thirteen through gentrification. My opinion on this video is that gentrification in this neighborhood is good because it is bringing life back to its local community. Gentrification can be a bad thing in some neighborhoods though because it can force poor families out of their home.
kyleigh hall's curator insight, May 12, 2017 11:21 PM
This article is about a person who bought a house in the suburb areas of New York. He put certain things in his house that is all historically or better for the world. This relates to what we are learning in world cultural geography because we are learning about the suburbs area and inner city areas of places. In my opinion it related to what we learned about a lot also I liked what he did with the stuff he used. 
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This grand OTR experiment is about all of us

This grand OTR experiment is about all of us | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Nowhere else in Cincinnati is contrast more evident than this one block of Republic Street. Rich and poor. Black and white. Dark past and vibrant future." 


Seth Dixon's insight:

The Over-The-Rhine neighborhood is very close to the APHG reading site, and the urban renewal here is quite controversial.  Many point to the economic positives and infusion of investments, while other see social displacement of the poor.  No matter your perspective, it is a place where there are very visible social boundaries

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

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Gentrification as Adoption?

Gentrification as Adoption? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"OTR A.D.O.P.T. transfers abandoned buildings to qualified new owners at reduced cost.  The catch? You must commit to rehabilitating the property and returning it to productive use. You must also demonstrate an ability to successfully complete such a project.  A.D.O.P.T.-Advancing Derelict and Obsolete Properties Through Transfer."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This banner was spotted by Laura Spess, an urban geographer in Cincinnati in during the 2014 APHG reading.   The Over-The-Rhine neighborhood is very close to the reading, and the urban renewal here is quite controversial.  Many point to the economic positives and infusion of investments, while other see social displacement of the poor.  After the reading we were discussing the messages embedded the sign (and the urban landscape).  The OTR ADOPT organization conceptually thought of poorer neighborhoods as orphans and that the gentrification process should be likened to adoption.  While the merits and problems of gentrification can be debated, I find that particular analogy painfully tone deaf and wasn't surprised to find the organizations website, well, derelict and obsolete.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why might this analogy be problematic?  How might current residents of the community feel about the message? 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

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APHG Reader Suggestions

APHG Reader Suggestions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've had a wonderful week in Cincinnati at the APHG reading.  Teachers love to share ideas and resources when we gather together and we've compiled 4 pages of links, books, websites and other resources that APHG readers have suggested for classroom use.  Here is a 4-page compilation of APHG reader-suggested resources. Additionally, here is the final newsletter (earlier editions of the newsletter archived here).   I'll miss the friendliness and professional expertise of this fantastic network of geography educators.  See you next year!

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Teacher Info

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What's up with the historic photos around OTR?

What's up with the historic photos around OTR? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Look Here! is a site-specific, outdoor, public history exhibition on the streets of Over-the-Rhine.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is to announce (and explain) the new public art project in Cincinnati's gentrifying neighborhood, Over the Rhine.  The exhibition will "include historic photographs of Over-the-Rhine ranging in time from the late nineteenth century through the 1940s. The exhibit will turn Over-the-Rhine into a museum of the streets that will provide an historic and cultural experience for all comers, any time, day or night. The exhibition will run from November 2015 to March 2016."

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, placeAPHG, Cincinnati

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Poverty (1964): Cincinnati Slums

TELEVISION DOCUMENTARY: Examines the slum areas of Cincinnati, Ohio, and provides extensive views of substandard housing in various parts of the city. Describes the problems of the uneducated and unemployed who cannot escape from poverty, but finds a "ray of hope" in a young school child. Offers no solution for eliminating urban poverty, but states that everyone "must try."
Seth Dixon's insight:

While some of the technological presentation and the intellectual framework are certainly outdated, it is a glimpse into how America thought about poverty during the LBJ administration and the famous "War on Poverty."


Tagsurban, economic, Cincinnati, historical, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.


At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Later this month I will be in Cincinnati (pictured above) and will see firsthand some of the urban changes that freeways have had on the landscape, neighborhoods, and the lives of residents.  This article has some "swipe" aerial photography on Cincinnati, Detroit, and Minneapolis for your analysis. 


Tags: urbantransportation, planning, historical, urban models, APHG, neighborhoodCincinnati

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:00 AM

It is really interesting to see how urbanization has affected not just us today but our parents and grandparents. Of course with innovation includes consequence whether good or bad it happens. Go America!

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:34 AM

Urbanization - transportation

 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

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Visualizing Urban Change

Visualizing Urban Change | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"60 years has made a big difference in the urban form of American cities. The most rapid change occurred during the mid-century urban renewal period that cleared large tracts of urban land for new highways, parking, and public facilities or housing projects. Fine-grained networks of streets and buildings on small lots were replaced with superblocks and megastructures. While the period did make way for impressive new projects in many cities, many of the scars are still unhealed.  We put together these sliders to show how cities have changed over half a century. In this post, we look at Midwestern cities such as [pictured above] Cincinnati, Ohio."

Seth Dixon's insight:

It's ironic that I feel more accustomed to exploring Cincinnati, OH on foot than I do Providence, RI.  Although I drive in downtown Providence regularly, I seldom have a reason to walk and explore it.  In my yearly visits to Cincinnati to score the AP Human Geography exams, I'm outside my hometown and away from my typical routine. That helps me feel more like a flâneur, to stroll the streets and explore the urban landscape.  This set of 7 before and after images shows Midwestern cities (Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Cleveland, and Columbus) lets you digitally analyze the last 70 years of urban morphology.  Click here for a gallery 7 of cities in Texas and Oklahoma


Questions to Ponder: What are the biggest changes you see for the 1950 to today?  How are the land uses difference?  Has the density changed?  Do any of urban models help us understand these cities?


Tags: urban, planning, industry, economichistorical, geospatial, urban models, APHG.

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Very useful!

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:22 AM

In the above picture of Cincinnati, Ohio it is clear how much change American cities have undergone in 60 years. In the process of urban renewal these cities have been affected tremendously with the addition of new roads, businesses, and most likely the turning of land over to private developers. All previous land has been renovated and changed into the typical urbanized American city. S.S.

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The Underground Railroad - National Geographic Education

The Underground Railroad - National Geographic Education | Geography Education | Scoop.it
You are a slave in Maryland in the 1800s. Can you escape? Learn what challenges slaves faced in National Geographic's Underground Railroad adventure. Get information, pictures, photographs, biographies, resources, and more.

 

This is a good interactive to explore the historical geographies of slavery and abolition.  Hopefully, AP HG readers will get to learn more about the Underground Railroad in Cincinnati, OH.   

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