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Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography

Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Bangladesh is exposed to threat of hazards resulting from a number of natural disasters and remains classified as one the most vulnerable countries. Majority of the country is affected by cyclone, drought and floods.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Bangladesh is regularly hit with different types of natural disasters. The impact of these natural disasters costs the country millions making it dependent on foreign aid.  Disaster clean-up and relief aid after major floods, droughts, and hurricanes.  

 

Tagsdisasters, environmentBangladeshSouth Asia, development.

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Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:47 PM

Multiple challenges already face residents of Dhaka and Bangladesh in its entirety, but add into the mix climate change and the situation becomes even worse. How does this human induced phenomenon impact upon the population of the developing country and its ever-growing Mega City?

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 22, 2018 10:53 AM
These maps help show all of the natural disasters that Bangladesh is accustomed to. As one look through all of the maps that shows such things such as flood zone, cyclone zones, and drought zones we can tell that this country is ripe with geographical issues that will effect its problems both politically and economically.  With this many geographical problems with natural disasters one can only imagine how much money the country spends simply on just rebuilding itself. It is hard to continue to move forward as a country when you need to constantly rebuild. Also you become dependent on other countries with a need for foreign aid for these problems. By needing foreign aid Bangladesh becomes dependent on these countries thus making it harder for them to make good deals for their economy. If you were setting up the perfect location for a country, Bangladesh probably would not be the first place selected. However, we must look at the history of the people that live there and see why this location was chosen?  Also we must look at the future and with a changing climate how will it effect Bangladesh geography, and will we eventually see people moving out of the country and how will that effect the surrounding areas and their population. 
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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Dhaka is the capital of Bangladesh and (as I often tell my students) it is the biggest city that nobody has ever heard of.  The infrastructure is so incredibly limited that traffic jams cost the city an estimated $3.8 billion in delays and air pollution.  This is an excellent article to explore some of the problems confronting megacities. 


Tags: Bangladeshtransportation, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 1:09 PM

What's amazing is the way the pedestrians go about their business walking in between cars and buses. A person would think it would be faster and healthier to walk. It costs 3.8 billion dollars in delays and air pollution why not spend that money on Traffic devices. I am assuming that it is not money wise but economically wise they are talking about the cost factor. If that is the case the city would have to front the money to pay for the traffic devices and recoup the money from the businesses that benefitted from the insertions of traffic devices. Environmentally it would be a good thing so all those people are not  breathing in  all the pollution which must cause health issues.

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:50 AM

Its amazing how much traffic can affect air pollution, especially in such a small place. Dhaka is heavily populated, traffic in this small but heavily populated community is very stressful, even to look at in the photo provided above. I can't imagine living in such a heavily populated area. I guess you can compare it to downtown New York City. However the pollution is more intense in Dhaka than it is in NYC.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:35 PM

This is a prime example of a megacity and the population that it cohabits the city. The huge populaiton that is se densley populated in such a small area creates for a large traffic and pedestrian issues. After watching the video you would think that there would be more accidents but living in a city like this you would get use to the population ways and learn the ways of life.

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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."

Seth Dixon's insight:

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 2014 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:03 PM

The triangle shirtwaist factory in New York was a revolutionary turning point in labor regulations. Following this unfortunate event there had been many rules and laws that took effect in order to help the working people in factories and other harmful work places. The textile industry had been such an impact on globalization because this product had been so greatly treasured that countries all around the world were getting their fair share of producing a good that was in such high demand and through the use of globalization transport created an higher demand for textiles. Although, the boom of the textile industry came with the sacrifice of innocent civilians who worked endlessly just to feed their family. Regulations and legislation have to be put into effect to protect our people and our economy. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:17 AM

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply
Seth Dixon's insight:

In what ways is access to safe drinking water both a physical geography and human geography issue?  How do changes in one factor influence the others? 


Tags: Bangladesh, water, development.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:39 PM

For over 20% of the population, finding safe drinking water in Bangladesh is a daily struggle that is only expected to worsen in the coming decades.These Bangladeshis live in "hard-to-reach" areas of the nation, along the swampy marshlands of the inlands and coastal outlets, where access by roads is severely restricted. This makes it difficult to transport the necessary aid to these regions, placing them disproportionately at the peril of natural disasters and other such catastrophes. The increasing salinity of the water in these areas- the result of acid rain and other man-made climate changes- has made it extremely difficult for the people of these regions to find the drinking water necessary to replenish their exploding population. With the effects of climate change only worsening, the plight of these people can be expected to get worse and worse. Millions of people face increasing health risks and even death as we move forward into the 21st century; I hope that the powers that be are able to find a solution to help these people receive the aid they so desperately need. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:34 AM

Water is essential to human survival. Contaminated water is a detriment to human survival. Extreme weather has caused a dwindling of the safe drinking water supply in Bangladesh. The consequences of this dwindling are catastrophic.  A lack of safe drinking water will inevitably lead to the demise of many people. Warfare is often a consequence of a lack of precious resources. No resource in the world is more precious than water. This issue was caused by extreme weather increasing the salinity of water in the costal areas. Physical geography plays a huge role in the availability of safe drinking water. Areas more prone to extreme weather are far more likely to experience these same kinds of issues. Unfortunately, Bangladesh in one of those areas that is effected by this type of scenario.  

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:04 AM

Access to safe drinking water is a physical and human geography issue because it all depends on location. For example, in Dhaka, a heavily populated area, fresh water is limited. Besides waters/rivers in Dhaka being polluted, this is a poverty filled area and government funds can only get so much for people. Dhaka is a poor, urban, and populated community.

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:48 AM

There is a lot of poverty and pollution in Dhaka. The demands for energy and water are high in Dhaka as well. I personally don't see how these people and migrants can live in such a polluted and dirty place and the reason why I can't imagine living in such a place is because I never have. I'm lucky enough to not experience poverty and I greatly appreciate  my life and home. Hopefully things improve in Dhaka and places like Dhaka. Hopefully there will be less pollution and poverty in the future any where in the world.

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 5:42 PM
Dhaka is the highly overpopulated city in Bangladesh. Dhaka is one of many megacities that can food production cannot keep up with the influx of people. Dhaka is home to 15 million people. Which is crazy because its not a country its a city within a country. It is one of the fastest growing megacities but also one of the poorest with slums around every corner. People gravitate to Dhaka because of the many natural disasters that ruin peoples only source of income and food their land. People ultimately will have no other choice but to move to this megacity in the near future.
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Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease
Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 2018 12:22 PM
The dangerous conditions of working on these ships is impossible to imagine. Toxic chemicals and fumes, risks of collapses, explosions, or falling debris makes this job borderline inhumane. The risks to workers seems irrelevant in the eyes of the owners of these ships who com to Bangladesh because they know the environmental and workplace regulations are nonexistent. However, this entire situation is created by the swelling pressures of globalization and rapidly accelerating international sea trade.
tyrone perry's curator insight, May 2, 2018 12:24 PM
Bangladesh is one of the largest shipwrecking ports in the world.  This is a very dangerous and low paying job.  because work is so scarce in Bangladesh there are many skill less people looking for work at any cost.  many ships show up with dangerous gasses still in the ship and also lined with asbestos.  on average in the last few years about 15 people die a year.  This has become large because of cheap labor and low environmental and safety standards.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 11:19 PM
Bangladesh is a poor country and the shipping trade has taken advantage of the poverty here because they know men will work for little pay and do very dangerous work. As well the shipping industry takes advantage of the lack of environmental laws here so they can pollute and will not get in trouble for it. Making the efforts of countries with environmental laws obsolete. Bangladesh's coast line if filled with huge ships waiting to be demolished this ship wrecking industry has ruined there shore line. The workers are exposed to harsh chemicals and fumes diminishing there life expectancy. It does not seem like there is any hope for these people. It needs to come from the shipping boat companies and all they care about is money not people.
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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:58 AM

Besides that scrap metal pollutes water and rivers, this is a health risk for humans too. I also know someone who worked at Electric Boat at the Air Base in North Kingstown who's health was also affected due to metal scraps and particles in the air. Years later after working at EB he developed lung cancer. Metal erodes away as well, especially when left sitting in salt water. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:54 AM

this is both amazing and horrifying in what these people do on a daily basis. i cannot imagine doing what these guys do everyday, and i never imagined how taking apart one of these ships would work.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:16 AM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh,  South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Walled World

Walled World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an in-depth, multi-media interactive that explores the political, economic and cultural implications of borders that are heavily fortified or militarized (I found this too late to be included in the "best posts of 2013" list, but this will be the first to include for 2014).  Not all of these borders are political; in Brazil it explores the walls that separate different socioeconomic groups and in Northern Ireland they look at walls dividing religious groups.  The interactive examines various borders including U.S./Mexico, Morocco, Syria, India/Bangladesh, Brazil, Israel, Greece/Turkey, Northern Ireland, North/South Korea and Spain The overarching questions are these: why are we building new walls to divide us?  What are the impacts of these barriers?

  

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, unit 4 political.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   


Tags: Bangladesh, water, pollution, poverty, squatter, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Rise of solar panel energy in Bangladesh

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:28 PM

Because of the rise in solar power energy it is allowing what I would consider a dark country is so important is because it is allowing the people of the area to have a longer day. Most people would be at home in the dark but with this cheap and affordable government funded solar panel they are able to have a longer day and seem to be able to be healthier lifestyle as they are not left out in the dark and able to go to a pharmacy at all times. These solar panels can run up to two light bulbs for ten hours allowing life to continue whether its dark or not.

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 2018 5:33 PM
A small village in Bangladesh is not generally what comes to mind when you think of solar energy, but this small village is using solar energy to help advance it.. Homes and businesses in this village are installing solar panels due to the lack of electricity. These solar panels make it possible for this town to function past sundown. 
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 5:15 PM
Bangladesh is a very poor and undeveloped nation and most do not have access to electricity. For most of life before solar energy, people stopped when the sun went out. At first the people of Bangladesh did not believe in the idea of Solar energy but that is because they didn't know what it was and the good it could do. Within two years however people started to believe and know around one million homes have solar panels. This is the fastest expansion of solar panels in the world.  The solar panels are also cheap which help the villagers who do not bring in a lot of extra income. The fact that solar panels are actually attainable amenities in Bangladesh is key to villagers success in the modern world.