Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Mexico City 1968

Mexico City 1968 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The 1968 Olympics took place in Mexico City, Mexico. It was the first Games ever hosted in a Latin American country. And for Mexico City, the event was an opportunity to show the world that they were a metropolis as worthy as London, Berlin, Rome or Tokyo to host this huge international affair. The 1968 Olympics were decreed 'the Games of Peace.' So Wyman designed a little outline of a dove, which shop owners all over the city had been given to stick in their windows. A protest movement, led by students, was growing in the city around [the organizers and designers]. These protestors believed the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) catered to wealthy Mexicans rather than the poor, rural and working class. Although the country had been experiencing huge economic growth, millions of people had still been left behind. The 'Mexican Miracle' hadn’t reached everyone."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Few years are as powerful in the minds of Mexican identity as the year 1968.  Like so many 99 percent invisible podcasts, this blends urban design, social geography, local history in a way that deepens our understanding of place. The built environment can be molded to project an image, and can be used to subvert that same message by the opposition.    

 

Tagssport, Mexico, Middle America, urban, architecture, place, landscape.

 

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 20, 2017 1:16 PM
How has the disparity of the economy affected the density of population in Mexico?  Did the Olympics ultimately help or hurt Mexico?
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Analog GPS: Scrolling Wrist & Car-Mounted Maps of the Roaring 20s & 30s

Analog GPS: Scrolling Wrist & Car-Mounted Maps of the Roaring 20s & 30s | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Long before the days of celebrity voices calling out directions while you drive, paper-based attempts at mobile mapping generated an intriguing array of proto-GPS systems, including this quirky pair of manual and automated moving map displays.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in  99 Percent Invisible.  Of course I would be especially drawn to this particular podcast--an historical glimpse at information overload in the analogy era, mapping technologies to aid navigation--this is just fascinating. 

 

Tagspodcasttransportationmapping, GPS, cartographyhistorical.

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Digitalent's curator insight, March 23, 2016 8:18 PM

I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in  99 Percent Invisible.  Of course I would be especially drawn to this particular podcast--an historical glimpse at information overload in the analogy era, mapping technologies to aid navigation--this is just fascinating. 

 

Tags:  podcast, transportation, mapping, GPS, cartography,  historical.

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The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie

The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What we call Chinese food (including the fortune-filled cookies) has become an integral part of the American culture and cuisine, with a complex history that dates back to the 19th Century."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This  99 Percent Invisible podcast explores the fascinating story of the Americanization of Chinese food, and the icon of Chinese food in the States, the  fortune cookie (no, that is decidedly NOT from China).  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content. 

 

That first podcast is reminiscent of a second podcast from  NPR about an American-style Chinese restaurant that opened in Shanghai to cater to Americans living in China who miss 'Chinese food' as it's made back home.  What's the name of the restaurant?  Fortune Cookie, of course. 

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, California, podcast, historical.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 3:44 PM

As with some other cultures, the Chinese food we eat is different from it original homeland (Mexican food is another example). Many thing the fortune cookie if from China, but it is an American idea. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:58 PM

unit 3

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27 Facts About Maps

A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John shares 27 facts about maps.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags mapping, trivia, cartography.

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Ashley Burleson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 9:45 AM

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags:  mapping, trivia, cartography.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 12:43 PM

Maps are awesome - need I say more! This clip actually covers a significant amount on the power / influence of maps through history.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 12, 2015 12:59 AM

Very USA centric but entertaining and makes you think about the taken-for- granted use of maps. We do believe them!!

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99% Invisible

99% Invisible | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A Tiny Radio Show About Design with Roman Mars
Seth Dixon's insight:

I’ve recently wrote about the 99 Percent Invisible podcast and while it is not explicitly (or even always) geographic, it is loaded with excellent materials about design and the details of the world around us that often go unnoticed, but deserve greater scrutiny. 

How did design lead to the the rise and fall of the mall?   (see the oddly fascinating DeadMalls.com for photo galleries in your local area).  How did the expansion of billiards end the horrors of the ivory trade and lead to the age of plastics?  These are some of the questions that the podcast explores.    

Tagspodcast, architecture.

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In the Same Ballpark

In the Same Ballpark | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In 1992, the Baltimore Orioles opened their baseball season at a brand new stadium called Oriole Park at Camden Yards, right along the downtown harbor. The stadium was small and intimate, built with brick and iron trusses—a throwback to the classic ballparks from the early 20th century. It was popular right from the start.

These new Populous ballparks are small and old fashioned-looking but they also feature modern amenities—comfortable seats and fancy foods. And while designed to be different, they tend to follow a similar aesthetic format, featuring a lot red brick and green-painted iron. These new parks also feature asymmetrical playing fields, which are in many cases dictated by the surrounding cityscape."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This podcast is filled with important urban geographic issues: downtown revitalization, landscape aesthetics, sense of place, planning, public/private revitalization, etc.  And to boot, this podcast uses America's pasttime to discuss these topics. I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in the 99 Percent Invisible podcast.

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The forgotten way African Americans stayed safe in a racist America

The forgotten way African Americans stayed safe in a racist America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When racist towns used to lynch people, these guides helped keep black travelers safe
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationraceclassculture, historical, ethnicity.

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Tania Gammage's curator insight, March 17, 2016 10:58 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 20, 2016 12:48 AM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 2016 5:10 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

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Lawn Order

Lawn Order | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In communities across America, lawns that are brown or overgrown are considered especially heinous. Elite squads of dedicated individuals have been deputized by their local governments or homeowners’ associations to take action against those whose lawns fail to meet community standards."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that shows not only the environmental aspects of America’s obsession with well-manicured lawns, it also nicely explored the cultural norms that police our behavior to create the stereotypical suburban landscape.  This is my favorite quote from the podcast: “There’s a paradox to the lawn. On the one hand, it is the pedestal on which sits the greatest symbol of the American Dream: the home, which people can ostensibly govern however they wish. And yet—homeowners often have almost no control over how they should maintain their lawn. Grass may be a plant, but a lawn is a designed object.”


Tags: housingneighborhood, cultural norms, consumption, water, environmenturban ecology, culture.


"When the well's dry, we know the worth of water." ~Benjamin Franklin

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New Old Town

New Old Town | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Like many cities in Central Europe, Warsaw is made up largely of grey, ugly, communist block-style architecture. Except for one part:  The Old Town. Walking through the historic district, it’s just like any other quaint European city. There are tourist shops, horse-drawn carriage rides, church spires. The buildings are beautiful—but they are not original."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a compelling 99 Percent Invisible podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 


Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

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aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 1:12 PM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

Beth Marinucci's curator insight, August 4, 2015 1:45 AM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

Yolanta Krawiecki's curator insight, August 7, 2015 10:30 PM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

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99 Percent Invisible

Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don't have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I’m not ashamed to admit that I love flags; I enjoy thinking about the cultural, economic and geopolitical symbolism embedded in the flags and what that means for the places they represent.  I share the above video for that purpose, but more importantly because it is an introduction to the audio podcast 99 Percent Invisible with a special ‘behind-the-scenes’ peek and how this podcast on flag design was made (and here is a snarky critique of all U.S. state flags).  Great geography resources rarely fall under the title “Geography” with a capital G.  It takes geographic training to “see the geography” in the world around us.  I’ve recently discovered the 99 Percent Invisible Podcast and while it is not explicitly (or even always) geographic, it is loaded with excellent materials about design and the details of the world around us that often go unnoticed, but deserve greater scrutiny.  For example the episodes on the Port of Dallas as well as reversing of the Chicago River show how the physical and human systems intersect within urban areas.  These two geo-engineering projects also were conceived on in very particular social, economic and technological contexts.

I also loved the episode Monumental Dilemma, about the uncomfortable 1800s New England memorialization of Hannah Duston for scalping Native Americans…this is incredibly awkward culturally as our society and social values have changes over the years.  Do we tear it down? Ignore it?  Apologize?  Since the historical legacy is unsettled, so is the monument.  So I’ll keep listening to the 99 Percent Invisible podcast and please recommend some especially geographic past episodes as I dig through the archives.                

 

Tagspodcast, architecture, TED.

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