Geography Education
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Why does the misperception that slavery only happened in the southern United States exist?

"Christy Clark-Pujara research focuses on the experiences of black people in British and French North America in the seventeenth, eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. She examines how the business of slavery—the buying and selling of people, food, and goods—shaped the experience of slavery, the process of emancipation, and the realities of black freedom in Rhode Island from the colonial period through the American Civil War."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is one of the many videos produced by the Choices Program about slavery in the New England (especially Rhode Island).  Featured in the videos is Dr. Christy Clark-Pujara, who wrote "Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island."  There is a reason to what we learn in history, and there are also reasons to the histories that are rarely told.  More than any other of the original thirteen colonies and states along the Eastern Seaboard, Rhode Island plied the triangle trade transporting more slaves to the Americas than all the other states combined.

 

Some Rhode Island slavery facts:

  • In 1776, Rhode Island had the largest proportion of slave population of any of the New England colonies.
  • During the antebellum period Rhode Islanders were the leading producers of “negro cloth,” a coarse wool-cotton material made especially for enslaved blacks in the American South.
  • More than 60 percent of all the slave ships that left North America left from Rhode Island.

 

Tags: raceRhode Island, slavery, labor, economic, historical.

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Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 29, 2018 7:20 PM
I believe that this is a very important video. I work in a house museum and the people who visit are surprised that not only did the owner of the house own slaves in the north after it was made illegal by the Rhode Island's gradual emancipation act in 1784, but he also continued to deal in slavery by sending ships to Africa. Even after the slave trade became illegal in the North that does not mean that they were not involved indirectly. The textile factories made clothes out of slave-picked cotton, the barrel makers products were used to hold rum and food for trade and the journey to Africa. It definitely needs to be discussed more in the classrooms and even on college campuses. More and more colleges and universities are opening up about their dark histories, but that is a great thing because they are then able to move forward and not ignore the evils in which they were involved. 

Interesting read that discusses institutions and their role in slavery, Craig Steven Wilder- Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities
 
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My Family’s Slave

My Family’s Slave | Geography Education | Scoop.it
She lived with us for 56 years. She raised me and my siblings without pay. I was 11, a typical American kid, before I realized who she was.

 

The Spanish Crown eventually began phasing out slavery at home and in its colonies, but parts of the Philippines were so far-flung that authorities couldn’t keep a close eye. Traditions persisted under different guises, even after the U.S. took control of the islands in 1898. Today even the poor can have utusans or katulongs (“helpers”) or kasambahays (“domestics”), as long as there are people even poorer. The pool is deep.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article created a huge stir from the moment it was published, especially within the U.S. Filipino community.  Slavery is reprehensible, but to most people today, it is incomprehensible to imagine how one human could ever enslave another.  This story of a Filipino family that brought a ‘domestic worker’ with them to the United States is a riveting tale that offers glimpses into the cultural context of modern-day slavery.  The author was born into this family and it’s a painful tale intermingled with agony, love, cruelty, tenderness, guilt, and growth.  This article is a long read, but well worth it.  You can listen to a 55-minute audio version of the article, or also listen to the NPR 5-minute version.    

 

Tags: migrationlaborPhilippines, culture.

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As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride

As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After the Civil War, members of the Confederacy fled to Brazil. Their ancestors still live in the region and continue to fly the Confederate flag.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   


Tags: Brazil, historicalthe Southlandscape.

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Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 5, 2015 6:25 PM

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   

 

Tags: Brazil, historical, the South, landscape.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:38 AM

The debate over the causes for the Civil War are always amusing. The main cause for the war was undoubtedly the issue of slavery. The souths  desperate attempts to hold on to the institution of slavery caused them to secede from the union. All of the major controversies between the north and the south  before the actual war involved slavery in one form or another. The Missouri Compromise or Bleeding Kansas would be just a few examples of that cause. I can understand the urge of southerners to want to celebrate their heritage. The problem is, they are celebrating a history that never existed. To describe the Civil War as an honorable gentile cause to beet back northern aggression is just not history, it is myth. I was to surprised to see Confederate celebrations in Brazil. Though, sense they were the last nation in this Hemisphere  to abolish slavery, it makes sense that some confederates would have fled there following the end of the war. Even more surprising was the fact that these heritage celebrations are biracial.  The power of myth can sway many people to a particular celebration or cause.

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.

Seth Dixon's insight:

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory CoastAfrica, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:12 PM

how do these people not know what the crop they are producing is or tastes like? that is amazing to me how you can be so oblivious to what you are doing. and how the place that produces cocoa does not actually have access to it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory Coast, Africa, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 4:30 PM
Chocolate is linked to modern day slavery in Africa. The cocoa bean is a billion dollar industry where westerners have the luxury of enjoying while the Ivory coast farmers have the sad fate of cultivating. Most farmers on the Ivory coast do not even know what the cocoa bean is made out of or what chocolate tastes like. Chocolate is a luxury on the Ivory coast because it is hardly available and very expensive. They simply are trying to make a living off of a highly consumed, taken for granted item in wealthy countries. We only see the pleasure behind the cocoa bean not the horrors it actually comes with.
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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This Washington Post article got me thinking about the geographies of supply chains.  The growing spread of the informal economy (a.k.a.-illicit trade, black market, etc.) has created opportunities for exploitation.  Many argue that free trade was created this power differential between the laborers who create these mass-manufactured products and the global consumers.  These critics argue that fair-trade, not free trade, with lead to sustainable economic growth and minimize social injustice.  Here is a NY Times article about how Mauritania is now confronting it's slavery past and present


Questions to Ponder:  What economic and cultural forces are needed for slavery to thrive?  What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today? How are your spending habits part of the system?


Additionally, this TED video (archived on scoop.it here) is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the global labor system. 


Tags: labor, economic, class, poverty.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:51 PM

This article has to do with unit 6 because it deals with development.This article explains how 30 million people work as forced labors, forced child soldiers,  forced brides and many other forced things. The map illustrates spatial patterns on economic and cultural factors on where the people enslaved are. The map shows that India is 1.1% enslaved.People say that fair trade and not free trade will lead to sustainable economic growth and lower social injustice. Two questions asked by the article is what realistically can we do to lessen slavery in the world today, and how our our own spending habits part of the system. The article also includes a video on some of the ways the slaves are treated poorly .

8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 9, 2017 7:19 AM

https://geographyeducation.org/courses/regional-geography-geog-400/modern-slavery/

 

This article describes when people in Africa are victims of modern day slavery. It tells us how people are forced into working long long hours a day with no breaks, barely any food or water and a very unsafe working environment. Some examples of what these poor people are forced into working as are laborers, prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides. Many people are also forced into marriages and illegal mining and smuggling of goods across borders . There are currently about 30 million modern day slaves all over the world. Their mostly in large parts of Africa and most of India. There's also some in Europe and in the U.S. One of the most unsafe working environment these slaves are forced into working in are the illegal mining projects. Their forced to work long hours in a mine that could collapse any second with nothing but a cheap flashlight tied to their head and a shovel or spade. 

 

I think this article connects to what were working on in class about modern slavery and Africa. I think this is very sad because I think everybody has the right to do what they feel like and deserve their freedom just like most people. This is extremely unfair and I think that more people should try and do something about it. Of course there are already loads of people trying to prevent this issue from spreading and I think it's a very kind and respectful thing to do. I did learn a lot from this article tho and the TED talk. One thing I learned was that this problem mostly appears in Africa. I honestly though that Asia and more parts of South America would have this issue as well. So yes, I learned quite a lot from this and I think that it was a good article with lots of useful information and I got a lot of emotional feelings from seeing the video.

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Jamaica Focuses on Farming

Jamaica Focuses on Farming | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The country has taken on a bold new strategy in the face of expensive food imports: make farming patriotic and ubiquitous."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Jamaica's historical agricultural products are cash crops that were connected to the plantation economy and in turn slavery.  Today, Jamaica is restructuring their agricultural production to address local food security issues rather than global market commodities.  This push will increase food security and to do so the government started a campaign with the slogan “grow what we eat, eat what we grow.” Grocery stores in Jamaica now identify local produce with large stickers and prominent displays as school children, backyard gardens and local businesses are all a part of the new agricultural initiative.  


Tags: agriculture, locavore, Jamaica, Middle America.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:34 PM

I have discussed Jamaica with some former classmates of mine, and they informed me that a lot of people are really poor there.  They said that the people there were very friendly, and hooked my friends up with some outstanding agricultural products at a really good price, but these people are very poor.  I think that because Jamaica was involved in the slave trade, and they didn't really as much of have slaves to do work like the US, but Jamaica was still involved in the slave trade, which ensured the presence of slaves.  While the US was building as a country, Jamaica was not thriving as much.  I think that the agriculture in Jamaica is (by what my friends say) fabulous as far as illegal crops go, but the agriculture FOR the Jamaicans (such as food) is lacking.  I read in the article that a European Development Agency sent money to Jamaica to help them be able to build chicken coops... So the chickens are enslaved too, and doomed to lay eggs or become a Sunday dinner.  That is kind of sad.  In all truth, I enjoy the taste of meat, but look forward to when meat and plants will be synthesized with no living tissue involved, because, after all, plants are alive too.  There are so many things that people have taken from the Earth, without giving anything back.  We are approaching the era where people should be more concerned with the environment, and what they can do for the Earth.  I think Jamaica should be given new technology that serves synthetic meat and synthetic vegetables, as a way to aid their agricultural and economic situation, rather than money for chicken coops from some pompous European cults.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 2014 1:53 PM

The article describes how Jamaica and a couple other Caribbean nations are beginning to focus more on food crops than cash crops. Being dependent on imports for food can be disastrous for these islands when a global food shortage makes prices skyrocket. Being food independent will likely allow Jamaica to increase its net agricultural gains so long as the production and demand for its cash crops of bananas and sugarcane remain high.

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 12:56 PM

Understanding how other countries survive their everyday lives is an important part of being a civil human being. As shown in one of the clips, a boy is putting on a tie before school and is on his way to eat breakfast. Not only does he have to eat breakfast at home, but he also is eating a stew that he picked the crops for. I could never imagine picking my own food in order to survive life. This scoop is enlightening in many ways.

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Persuasive Maps

Persuasive Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
John F. Smith's smartly-designed biblical anti-slavery map of the mid-19th Century United States. Prepared in 1888; excerpted from “Maps for an emerging nation”.


Maps don't just convey information--they can also shape the way that we think about the world that is being represented by that map.  Maps are texts and sometimes they have very strong perspectives that the cartographer put into that map.  This persausive map shows one way of interpreting American history after the end of reconstruction.  Notice that in addition to the very overt religious, moral tone condemning the South for slavery, the ideas of Manifest Destiny are also woven into the fabric of this map. 


Tags: cartography, historical, USA.

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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    

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8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 16, 2017 7:55 AM
This article and YouTube clip is talking about the child labor and modern slavery going on in West Africa. These regions are mostly used for cocoa bean plantations and harvesting. The guy leading this investigation also interviews people who are in charge of the chocolate making factories and asks them where the cocoa beans come from. Almost everyone answers, "the Ivory Coast" and have no idea what so ever what is actually going on there. They just order the amount of beans needed and have no clue what children have to go through to provide these people what they need. In this documentary they also interview some of the children having to go through this and it's very terrible and wrong. These children get taken away from their homes to work and get tricked that they're getting payed even though they don't get anything for all they do. In this clip I also get to see what the owners of the cocoa bean plantations say about what's going on and all the lies are just so silly and I cant believe what their thinking and why they're doing this.

This article connects a lot to what we've been working with in class. We even saw this movie about cocoa farms spread all over Wast Africa and this movie basically talked about the same things the other movie talked about. I enjoyed this movie a lot. Even though the information given was very sad and heart breaking I learned a lot of new things about the conditions of these slaves and and what they actually have to go through to please their "master" and how sad their lives are. When seeing this movie I just felt so bad and I just feel like I want to help these people so much.  
Ping Ping W's curator insight, February 15, 2018 11:33 PM

“Although slavery is no longer legal, there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa…”  Even though cocoa drinks are very delicious, have you ever stop to consider where how and who collected them? Here’s how they do it: slavery. It is still very common on cocoa plantations in West Africa. Children are smuggled from all over Africa (Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso, etc), then, they are placed on remote, isolated plantations. Also, thirty-five percent of world’s chocolate is produced by slave labour.

 

This helped me better understand Africa by informing me about how children were kidnapped and force to work...some children work at such a young age too. Before doing this research, I didn’t know how Cocoa even came to be! However, now that I know that children slavery was how cocoa was produced, it made me wonder if the factory knew? All the factory that bought their cocoa from Africa, do they know this is how they’re getting their products? And if they do, why don’t they do anything to stop children slavery or pay the workers at least? I think that cocoa factories in Africa must have really low budgets, or else they wouldn’t be kidnapping kids or adults to do the work in the form of modern slavery (without paying them too). 

K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, June 23, 2018 11:32 AM

The youth are not the only ones that have history and could improve or do things better or just in different way but the older generation also have our cross to bare. As this article i must admit put the fact that not everything that is seen as good come from good reasonings as chacolate is not seen as sinful when we purchase it from the store but to know that atleast some of it got its original origin from thd blood sweat and tears of others thru and by the means of slavery. Just because a thing is not counted as a sin in the eyesight of man it does not make it right to God. Just because slavery is no longer legal does not make it not done and even to the point we can become enslaved in the mindset.  Which is more crippling than the chains of bondage by being physically enslaved by others. 

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Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy

Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In [recent years], the South’s 150-year reverence for the Confederacy was shaken. Public officials responded to the national mourning and outcry by removing prominent public displays of its most recognizable symbol [the flag]. It became a moment of deep reflection for a region where the Confederate flag is viewed by many white Southerners as an emblem of their heritage and regional pride despite its association with slavery, Jim Crow and the violent resistance to the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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Treathyl Fox's comment, August 17, 2017 10:22 AM
Nobody in Iraq is debating the pulling down of the statue of Saddam Hussein. It's about what his statue "represented" to a people. It's the same thing with the Confederate symbols. America has an “80%” minority population. (The 80% is a joke.) From the Native Americans to anybody else in that percentage, you won't hear any of them arguing to defend the Confederacy as their “history” and “heritage”. Get real!
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:57 PM

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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Why America Needs a Slavery Museum

"The Whitney Plantation near Wallace, Louisiana, is the first and only U.S. museum and memorial to slavery. While other museums may include slavery in their exhibits, the Whitney Plantation is the first of its kind to focus primarily on the institution. John Cummings, a 78-year-old white southerner, has spent 16 years and more than $8 million of his own fortune to build the project, which opened in December of last year.

Cummings, a successful trial attorney, developed the museum with the help of his full-time director of research, Ibrahima Seck. The duo hope to educate people on the realities of slavery in its time and its impact in the United States today. 'The history of this country is rooted in slavery,' says Seck. 'If you don’t understand the source of the problem, how can you solve it?'"

 

Tags: raceconflictracism, historicalthe Southlandscape.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 2016 10:25 AM

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

Aris Pastidis's curator insight, March 11, 2016 1:24 AM

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest
Seth Dixon's insight:

One thing that baffles many students is how a resource-rich region can be an area of underdevelopment and poverty.  Understanding the historical geography is key for students being able to see that natural wealth does not correlate to enriching the local population.  Kinshasa, the capital that seemed so promising as the site of the famous "Rumble in the Jungle between Ali and Frazier, is now a city of chaos.  


Tags: Congo, political, conflict, resourcespolitical ecology, Africa.

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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 31, 2018 4:47 PM
(Africa) This article chronicles why the Democratic Republic of the Congo is among the lowest ranked countries on the Human Development Index despite its plethora of resources. The inciting action leading to DRC's modern problems is slavery. The Portuguese promoted internal warfare to topple the advanced Kingdom of Kongo in the late 1400s to allow better access to slaves. Later, the Congo's vast natural resources would actually be their bane; Europeans would be attracted to the land's fertile river soil, gold, diamonds, oil, and other minerals. The British and Belgian conquered the region ruthlessly first for rubber, then copper for WWI, then uranium for WWII, all the while keeping the Congolese subjugated without rights.

When the DRC gained independence in 1960, there was no framework or educated citizens who could provide stability and civil war predictably ensued, leading to a dictator unchallenged by the modernized world because of his sale of resources. Several African countries invaded, leading to hundreds of domestic and foreign militants fighting in chaos. Now, there is almost no infrastructure. The country's problems go back hundreds of years to a series of inhumane foreign interventions powered by the DRC's wealth potential.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, November 19, 2018 1:45 PM
It is mind blowing sometimes to look at a country at face value having that much wealth yet  being poor. There has been a struggle in the Congo for hundreds of years ranging from colonialism, to civil war, to today with rebel groups fighting for mineral control. The issues of needing minerals from the Congo, with its unstable corrupt government, will always lead to rebel groups (or the government itself) creating conflict to attain resources for wealth.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 1:30 PM
Why are so many resource-rich countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo so poor and unstable? More modern reasons like the corruption, the dictators, and wars come to mind sure, but what put countries like the DRC is these positions? Naturally, it all goes back to colonialism and slavery. The second that Europeans learned of the immense resources they carve up the territory, they have a skirmish to see who gets a bigger slice, and oppress the people so there is no chance of rebellion. In the DRC after Belgium finally left the Congolese had none of their own who were trained or had the experience to run a nation. I am sure there are people fighting for the best of the country, but when you have been kicked down for so long by so many peoples it is tough to get back up.
 
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'I will sell them,' Boko Haram leader says of kidnapped Nigerian girls

'I will sell them,' Boko Haram leader says of kidnapped Nigerian girls | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Fears for the fate of more than 200 Nigerian girls turned even more nightmarish when the leader of the Islamist group that kidnapped them said he'll sell them.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have hesitated to post about this topic for several reasons (unsure of the regional context, painful topic, religious overtones, etc.) but feel that it is important enough that it simply can't be ignored.  The abductions have triggered massive protests as we see the convergence of modern social mobilization and intelligence versus old-fashioned brute force.  This video is a quick introduction to the group Boko Haram and this article discusses their current activities.  Boko Haram came to power because of ecological disaster, oil politics and corruption.  Amnesty Internat'l answers the difficult question, "what can be done?"

 

Tags: Nigeria, slavery.

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SwagQueen's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:28 PM

i think Boko Haram is a Stupid moron who should be put into jail. the Nigerian government to save our girls. Innocent girls are being taken away from their homes and their parents want them back.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 2014 12:33 PM

Every one should see this video 4 reasons why Boko Haram does what it does. A bunch of idiots

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."


Tagsmapping, historical, cartography.

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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:33 AM

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.



Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 31, 2015 4:34 PM

A truly sad reality is exposed in this well-produced video.  Many of us hear about slavery still happening around us but I think most of us brush it off as little more than taboo.  To see these photos and to hear this woman's firsthand account is shocking.  If you are not instantly moved to want to help, I don't know if you're human.  This is atrocious and I only pray that one day this reality comes to an end.

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The Underground Railroad - National Geographic Education

The Underground Railroad - National Geographic Education | Geography Education | Scoop.it
You are a slave in Maryland in the 1800s. Can you escape? Learn what challenges slaves faced in National Geographic's Underground Railroad adventure. Get information, pictures, photographs, biographies, resources, and more.

 

This is a good interactive to explore the historical geographies of slavery and abolition.  Hopefully, AP HG readers will get to learn more about the Underground Railroad in Cincinnati, OH.   

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