Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Bir Tawil - the land that nobody wants

There's a patch of land between Egypt and Sudan that no country owns. Why? Can anybody claim it for themselves? (No.)
Seth Dixon's insight:

VIDEO SOURCE: If it's new to you, the Map Men YouTube channel is very entertaining with fun, quirky, interesting trivia, but most importantly, these videos are rooted in geographic concepts.  The Map Men, as Chris Fitch wrote, "tap into a rich vein of geographical quirks to teach through comedy."

 

VIDEO CONTENT: Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

GeoEd Tags: mapping, fun, video, political, Sudan, Egypt.

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Healthy Nation Rankings: These Are the Healthiest Countries

Healthy Nation Rankings: These Are the Healthiest Countries | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Maybe it’s something in the gazpacho or paella, as Spain just surpassed Italy to become the world’s healthiest country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This data offers excellent insight into regional developmental patterns around the world--it is very much worth exploring.  However I'm sharing this also for it's mapping project potential; the data behind this map is available in the article and students can make their own maps with it.  

 

GeoEd Tags: mortality, medical, development, food, mapping.

Scoop.it Tagsmortality, medicaldevelopmentfood, mapping.

 

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Renee's curator insight, May 14, 5:45 AM
This data will be helpful for students to exam how where a person lives influences their wellbeing (health with a focus on two Asian countries, as per curriculum descriptors). This can be a starting point for learner investigations of; reasons for, and consequences of, spatial variations in human wellbeing on a regional scale within India or another country of the Asia region (ACHGK079 - Scootle )
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U.S. Counties Vary by Their Degree of Partisan Prejudice

U.S. Counties Vary by Their Degree of Partisan Prejudice | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A guide to the most—and least—politically open-minded counties in America
Seth Dixon's insight:

I would like to start off by saying that I've lived in Red America and Blue America, and I love the people and places of both.  This is a fascinating set of maps because it isn't just about where are the Republicans and Democrats--we've all seen those maps.  More important to to me is attempting to discern where people can still see their neighbors as neighbors, even if they strongly disagree politically.  "In general, the most politically intolerant Americans, according to the analysis, tend to be whiter, more highly educated, older, more urban, and more partisan themselves."

 

 

GeoEd TAGS: electoral,  political, mapping.

Scoop.it Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Why Asia is the center of the world again

"Asians don't think of themselves as Asian, but as the new Silk Roads re-emerge and propel Asia to the center of the world economy, Asians are rediscovering their greatness and forging a new Asian identity for the 21st century."

Seth Dixon's insight:

When discussing global economic growth, it is impossible not to mention Asia. Parag Khanna is the author of the book, The Future is Asian, and in this TED talk he highlights how Asia is growing.  More importantly, he looks at how discrete Asian cultures are becoming more intermixed as the economic infrastructure of Asia becomes increasingly interconnected (a summary article is titled, We are all Asians Now).  His 2009 TED talk, Mapping the Future of Countries, about border conflicts, is an APHG classic.       

 

GeoEd Tags: regions, political, globalization, culture, economic, TED, video.

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The Man Behind Most of the Ski Maps in America

The Man Behind Most of the Ski Maps in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The ski trail map at your local mountain was probably painted by James Niehues. Now you can see his life's work in one beautiful book."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This new book looks to be a wonderful cartographic coffee table piece.  Good cartography lies at the intersection of rigorous scientific data display and an aesthetic touch of beauty. 

 

GeoEd Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art.

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Leading the Location Intelligence Revolution

"As GPS devises, sensors, and drones proliferate, the power of location intelligence increases exponentially. This means LI can bring clarity to the most pressing business challenges – even those that at first glance don’t seem location related. Esri has location down to a science – The Science of Where. Examples from the Bavarian Police Department, Switzerland’s largest retailer, Migros, the Port of Rotterdam, and the European Environment Agency, provide just a taste of the broad scope of challenges that can be tackled through the lens of where."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is a good demonstration of the value of GIS, geospatial technologies, and locational intelligence. 

GeoEd Tags: GIS, esri, video, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

Scoop.it Tags: GIS, ESRIvideo, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

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Catherine Pearce's curator insight, November 26, 2018 5:02 PM
Clearly illustrates the degree to which Geographic concepts of space are critical to modern systems.
Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2018 8:31 PM
The Location Revolution
Ivan Valles's curator insight, March 4, 10:57 PM
A great introductory video that provides real-world examples of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) at work to help create solutions to complex geospatial phenomenon. 
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USGS's Streamer Tool

USGS's Streamer Tool | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Streamer is a new way to visualize and understand water flow across America. With Streamer you can explore our Nation's major streams by tracing upstream to their source or downstream to where they empty.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Streamer is the online mapping application that lets anyone explore downstream and upstream along America’s rivers and streams (here is a YouTube tutorial). Streamer can be used to follow the paths of rivers up to their headwaters and down to the sea, to view location-related information such as weather radar and near real-time streamflow data, and to discover hydrologic connections between distant places.

 

Scoop.it Tags: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

WordPress TAGS: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

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Identifying Illegal Overfishing

Identifying Illegal Overfishing | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The vast majority of fishing vessels follow the rules governing fishing – but many are not, and these bad actors can cause a lot of damage. Vessels may take too many fish ­– overfishing – which is causing our fisheries to collapse. Then there is the problem of illegal fishing, which can occur in protected areas, in another country’s waters or on the high seas. This threatens jobs and food security for millions of people, all around the world.

The trouble is, so much of this illegal activity is hidden – it happens out to sea, making it difficult to scrutinize what individual vessels are getting up to. Fortunately, we are now beginning to see what happens after commercial fishing vessels leave port.

The interactive map we created allows anyone in the world with an internet connection to see the activities of the commercial fishing fleet globally."

 

Scoop.it Tags: water, conservation, biogeography, environmentpollution, resourcesmappingfood production, agriculture.

WordPress TAGS: water, biogeography, environment, pollution, resources, mapping, food production, agriculture.

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Political Bubbles and Hidden Diversity: Highlights From a Very Detailed Map of the 2016 Election

Political Bubbles and Hidden Diversity: Highlights From a Very Detailed Map of the 2016 Election | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Times’s interactive map of precinct results shows that even within partisan strongholds, there are contrary-voting enclaves.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This feature that shows the 2016 election results at the precinct level is astounding, revealing, and a testament to the difficulty of putting all this information together.  The built-in features in this interactive map to explore selected “voter islands” and one-sided places are especially helpful, but much like Google Earth, many people are eager to zoom in to their own neighborhoods.  The article that accompanies the interactive had some excellent case-studies at a variety of scales.  Geography always matters and the maps reveal so many telling patterns. 

 

Tags: electoral, politicaldensity, mapping.

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Five Tips and Strategies on How to Interpret a Satellite Image

Five Tips and Strategies on How to Interpret a Satellite Image | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What do you do when presented with a new satellite image? Here's what the Earth Observatory team does to understand the view.
  1. Look for a scale
  2. Look for patterns, shapes, and textures
  3. Define the colors (including shadows)
  4. Find north
  5. Consider your prior knowledge
Seth Dixon's insight:
  1. Look for a scale
  2. Look for patterns, shapes, and textures
  3. Define the colors (including shadows)
  4. Find north
  5. Consider your prior knowledge

Question #2: READ TO ANSWER FOR MORE INFO ON THE FIVE TIPS: earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Question #3: Also search through NASA’s Earth Observatory (Images or Articles) and the Jefferson Grid Instagram account.

 

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as can satellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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The art of making globes

"In the era of Google Maps, who makes a living out of creating globes - by hand? Peter Bellerby, of Bellerby & Co. Globemakers, for one. Headquartered in London, he talks with Martha Teichner about how a desire to purchase a globe led to him becoming one of the masters of the craft."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Yes, these globes are precise archives filled with geospatial data and locational information–however, that pales in comparison to the artistic brilliance of the globes. These hand-crafted globes are truly works of art.  Marvel at the merger of mathematical precision and artistic design that makes a globe such as these a cartographic gem. 

FUTURE WATCHING: Here is the longer video of the Bellerby Globes being produced.     

 

Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

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Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal

Maya civilization was much vaster than known, thousands of newly discovered structures reveal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya.

 

Archaeologists have spent more than a century traipsing through the Guatemalan jungle, Indiana Jones-style, searching through dense vegetation to learn what they could about the Maya civilization. Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya: defense works, houses, buildings, industrial-size agricultural fields, even new pyramids.

The lidar system fires rapid laser pulses at surfaces and measures how long it takes that light to return to sophisticated measuring equipment. Doing that over and over again lets scientists create a topographical map of sorts. Months of computer modeling allowed the researchers to virtually strip away half a million acres of jungle that has grown over the ruins. What's left is a surprisingly clear picture of how a 10th-century Maya would see the landscape.

Tags: lidar, spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciplesGuatemala, Middle America.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 2018 1:57 PM
Archaeologists are using new high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools to discover Mayan structures that have gone undetected for hundreds of years. This new method for archaeology has proved very successful as well, since tens of thousands of hidden Mayan structures have been detected using these new tools. This helps paint a different picture of what Mayan civilization was really like. For example, archaeologists now believe that the Mayan civilization may have had a population two to three times the size originally estimated and a much larger extension of land than previously thought. At the end of this article, what really made me think was how the Guatemalan jungle once hindered archaeologists from discovering Mayan structures, but now the jungle is seen as useful in preserving these structures over time, so they are not destroyed by people. It seems as though there is still much to learn about the Mayan civilization and their culture.
David Stiger's curator insight, September 23, 2018 8:38 PM
Thanks to new aerial scanning technology, a device called lidar, archaeologists cannot better use geological maps to create three dimensional scans of the earth and uncover buried ruins without moving a rock. Relying on advanced technology to help reveal humanity's past is exciting. Understanding how a civilization lived and functioned, how big it was, its activities, and its achievements brings modern day people closer to the past. 

Geography played a major role in this recent Mayan excavation. The jungles which once prevented archaeologists from seeing what ruins were left actually preserved the ruins by preventing farmers from changing the land. If it were not for the dense areas of jungle, agricultural development would have eroded and destroyed these last remnants of the Mayan civilization. Luckily, farmers avoided these areas and the new technology made available to archaeologists has allowed this once problematic obstacle to become a blessing in disguise and a massive opportunity. 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 29, 2018 8:46 PM
Technology is an amazing tool. Using technology to find old temples and buildings is truly astounding. The lidar mapping tools used have created something that would take people years to do. Acres upon acres of forest in Guatemala would have to be mapped and traversed by foot to find any signal of the Maya civilization under the centuries of reclaimed land. If you have ever been to the Mayan temples you would know they are a sight to behold, glorious and awe-inspiring. Technology like this gives us a whole new view of the world and civilizations. Using these could help find many old forgotten cities, not only in Guatemala but all over the world. 
 
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Story Map Swipe and Spyglass Gallery

Story Map Swipe and Spyglass Gallery | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Story Map Swipe and Spyglass app template enables users to interact with two web maps or two layers of a single web map, depending on how you build your story. The app enables you to present a single view, or to develop a narrative showing a series of locations or views of the same maps."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The ESRI template to create swipe and spyglass feature is an engaging way to compare and contrast two data layers. For the SPYGLASS maps, I've always enjoyed this historical interactive of Chicago. Chicago is displaced during a economic boom period as the U.S. was expanding westward.  Where were the railroads located then?  Why have some of them vanished today?  Notice anything curious about the coastline along Lake Michigan?  Follow this link to see similar interactives of other major U.S. cities.

For the SWIPE maps, I love exploring this one showing how human activities has reshaped the physical environment.  What activities are creating the new patterns that you see? 

 

Tags: historical, mappingESRIStoryMap.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 16, 2018 9:18 AM
Geographical Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 2018 6:35 AM

A great Esri tool for examining change over time 

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Will the Supreme Court End Gerrymandering?

Will the Supreme Court End Gerrymandering? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Justices will be reviewing the case of North Carolina, where Republicans drew a map to maximize their power in the House. Plaintiffs challenging the map say it’s unconstitutional. A companion case centers on Maryland’s 6th Congressional District, which Democrats admit they redrew in 2011 to make it harder for the Republican incumbent there to win re-election. The two cases hold the potential to set the course of American politics for generations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: Do you trust the politicians that are in charge of your state to create better districts than a computer-generated set of districts that are optimized for compactness?  What are some of the potential limitations of compact districts?  Would an independent committee/bipartisan group do a better job?

GeoEd Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, cartography, unit 4 political.

Tags: gerrymandering, politicalmapping, cartography, unit 4 political.

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GFPLAIN250m, a global high-resolution dataset of Earth’s floodplains

GFPLAIN250m, a global high-resolution dataset of Earth’s floodplains | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Identifying floodplain boundaries is of paramount importance for earth, environmental and socioeconomic studies addressing riverine risk and resource management. However, to date, a global floodplain delineation using a homogeneous procedure has not been constructed. In this paper, we present the first, comprehensive, high-resolution, gridded dataset of Earth’s floodplains at 250-m resolution (GFPLAIN250m).
Seth Dixon's insight:

Satellites see the world as a bunch of pixels.  In this recent article in the journal Nature, the authors used a global set of satellite images to create the first global layer of floodplains.  This data is now publicly accessible as a free download (one you can put into ArcGIS after the files are extracted and zipped).     

 

GeoEd Tags: mapping, ESRI, GIS, remote sensing.

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Connecticut's Changing Landscape

Connecticut's Changing Landscape | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Changing Landscape is a remote sensing-based land cover study that charts landscape changes in Connecticut and portions of New York. It covers the 25-year period from 1985 to 2010 (with in-between dates of 1990, 1995, 2002 and 2006). It includes information on basic land cover, as well as subsidiary analyses of riparian corridor land cover, impervious cover and agricultural field and soil analysis."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This story map, created with the Story Map Journal application in ArcGIS Online, is a great example of how to use the "Story Action" features.  Story Action features can move the map view to a particular location or change what is being displayed on the main stage of the story map.  These can also be used to navigate to a different section of the a story map.

Here are two excellent Story Maps that use "Story Action" features.  Please take some time to explore both of them and note how these features enhance the presentation of this spatial information:

  1. Connecticut's Changing Landscape
  2. Damaged and Defiant: Houston Stories
  3. And just for fun, the Cross-Section of elevation along the meridians.

 

Scoop.it Tagsurban ecology, mappingESRIStoryMap.

WordPress TAGS: urban ecology, mapping, esri, storymap.

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Beautiful Maps of the World's Watersheds

Beautiful Maps of the World's Watersheds | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Nothing is more fundamental to life than water - so see the world's watersheds like never before with these colorful and absolutely stunning maps.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love the cartographic design of these three maps that shows the importance of river basins. In this one in particular, highlights the Danube and Volga river basins as the most extensive river basins in their regions. For countries in the Danube basin without a coastline, these fluvial connections are critical. The Volga river basin is enormous, but the fact that it flows into the Caspian Sea limits the natural advantage of this river system (this shows exactly why the Volga-Don Canal was such a massive project during the Soviet era).

Often we focus on political boundaries to define regions, but watersheds are natural ecological regions that shape transportation and trade connections.    

 

Scoop.it Tags: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

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Steve Dann's curator insight, May 7, 8:59 AM
Great map - useful
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Using BatchGeo

"Quick tutorial on using BatchGeo to create a map using your own spreadsheet (Excel) data."

Seth Dixon's insight:

BatchGeo is incredibly easy to use mapping platform...think of it as GIS-lite, but only for simple points on a map (no lines or polygons). If you have a spreadsheet full of point data, you can make a map with your own data. You can grab data straight from an online list (like Wikipedia), but you can also use spreadsheets, databases, or any other tab delimited dataset.

Scoop.it Tagsmapping, CSV, edtech.

WordPress TAGS: mapping, edtech.

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New census data projects which states could gain or lose congressional seats in 2020 reapportionment

New census data projects which states could gain or lose congressional seats in 2020 reapportionment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
the Census Bureau released its population estimates for 2017 for every state, detailing how many residents each state has gained or lost since the 2010 census. The firm Election Data Services has used these estimates to project how many congressional seats each state might gain or lose in the 2020 round of reapportionment, which assigns each state its share of the House’s 435 districts based on its population.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Reapportionment is a forgotten step.  Before a state can redistrict the congressional districts within the state, every 10 years, the Federal government is constitutionally required to conduct a census with the main goal of being able to reapportion the congressional seats based on the decennial census.  The upcoming 2020 Census is big deal, showing regional population shifts with political ramifications.   

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Ventusky - Wind, Rain and Temperature Maps

Ventusky - Wind, Rain and Temperature Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Animated wind, rain and temperature maps, detailed forecast for your place, data from the best weather forecast models such as GFS, ICON, GEM
Seth Dixon's insight:

With people on the East Coast concerned about the possible trajectories for Hurricane Florence, I think it is the right time to share these two interactive maps: Ventusky and Windy.  In the past, I also shared NullSchool's  mesmerizing digital globe with wind data and many other options.  Collectively, these my three favorite online visualization of meteorological data.  Any other favorites?  To friends and family in the Carolinas, stay safe.   

  

Scoop.it Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

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K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 2018 7:37 PM

With people on the East Coast concerned about the possible trajectories for Hurricane Florence, I think it is the right time to share these two interactive maps: Ventusky and Windy.  In the past, I also shared NullSchool's  mesmerizing digital globe with wind data and many other options.  Collectively, these my three favorite online visualization of meteorological data.  Any other favorites?  To friends and family in the Carolinas, stay safe.   

  

Scoop.it Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

WordPress TAGS: physical,  weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

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Damaged and defiant: Hurricane Harvey

Damaged and defiant: Hurricane Harvey | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Houston holds strong in the wake of devastation left by Hurricane Harvey.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I am sharing these three interactive webmaps of Houston with my mapping courses to demonstrate what is technologically possible.  Texts, charts, pictures, videos, and maps can be seamlessly integrated to present spatial information in an incredibly engaging and accessible manner.  

Houston's Hurricane Harvey was incredibly impactful but the factors leading to this were also very complex.  These three Story maps lay out:

  1. Houston's urban ecological context
  2. The geographic origins of Hurricane Harvey
  3. The human stories from Hurricane Harvey

 

Scoop.it Tagsphysical, watercoastal, urbanurban ecology, disasters, mappingESRIStoryMap.

WordPress TAGS: physical, water, coastal, urban, urban ecology, disasters, mapping, esri, storymap.

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Mapping Apps May Make Traffic Worse

Mapping Apps May Make Traffic Worse | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Apps like Waze, Google Maps, and Apple Maps may make traffic conditions worse in some areas, new research suggests.

 

In the pre-mobile-app days, drivers’ selfishness was limited by their knowledge of the road network. In those conditions, both simulation and real-world experience showed that most people stuck to the freeways and arterial roads. When there are more app-using drivers, congestion builds up at off-ramps, creating more traffic on the freeway. While it’s clear that traffic on local roads gets worse with the use of these apps, Bayen said that nobody has managed to do a multi-scale analysis that can determine if the apps, even if they create local problems, are better or worse for whole traffic basins.

 

Tags: urbantechnology, transportation.

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Houston’s stories of Hurricane Harvey

Houston’s stories of Hurricane Harvey | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Blue and her team selected 45 stories, each plotted with ESRI’s ArcGIS software on a map of Greater Houston and tied to the exact location where it was first told. The resulting story map of Hurricane Harvey, ‘Damaged and Defiant: Houston Stories,’ was published in the Houston Chronicle in December. The map shows short narratives gathered by Chronicle staffers from people across the area — from Crosby to Kingwood to Katy — each a unique perspective on the storm; told together, they’re the collective account of a city that experienced one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These interlinked Houston story maps show some of the key elements of a good story map: 1) strong spatial analytical components, 2) a powerful narrative, 3) rich visuals, 4) solid cartography, and 5) well-sourced information.

 

Tags: fluvialwatercoastal, urban, disasters, physical, mappingESRIStoryMap.

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The Two Koreas

The Two Koreas | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"While the Korean War of the early 1950s never formally ended, its aftermath has created starkly divergent worlds for those living on either side of the north-south divide. What follows is a look at life in the two Koreas; how such a night-and-day difference came to be; and where the crisis could go from here. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate rulers of the peninsula. Tensions between north and south gradually mounted, until finally, in June 1950, hundreds of thousands of North Korean troops stormed across the 38th parallel. The unsuspecting South Korean defenders were outgunned and outnumbered, and beat a hasty retreat southward."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This excellent interactive was created by Esri's Story Maps team using the Story Map Cascade app--making it an great resources of the geography of the Korean Peninsula as well as a stellar example of how maps, infographics, videos, images and text can be combined using ArcGIS online.

 

Tags: mappingESRIStoryMapinfographic, visualizationNorth KoreaSouth Korea, East Asiaborders, political, geopolitics, historical.

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Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 9:10 PM
The two Koreas are polar opposites literally, North and South. The Korean war that took place some 68 years ago never formally ended because they could not come to peace agreements. So the border between North and South Korea known as the DMZ is the most heavily fortified border in the world because tensions still run high. The DMZ is the cease fire line. Both sides fear invasion, however in the current state of things it seems as if the North is more aggressive towards invasion that the South, as the South has found some secret tunnels and fear there's more by the North Koreans. Economically the North is severely behind in the world because of there dictators. While the South has become an economic Tiger thanks to the UN and USA trying to promote democracy in the area.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 3:51 PM
The two Koreas are a great example of how Capitalism, Democracy, and liberty are far better than Communism. Just the difference in light visible from satellites at night in the two countries speaks volumes. The war being technically not over and only under cease-fire always leaves that chance for the conflict to reopen. Though today they are taking major steps toward peace and making moves that have never been done before. The amount of famine and overall  sub quality of life in North Korea is mind blowing, and with much of it kept secret its hard to imagine how bad it really is.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 3:54 PM
For the two Korean nations, there are stark contrasts in the standard of living and wealth of the people. While the Korean war began in the 1950's it never formally ended a ceasefire was called and has just not flared up in a massive battle again. The two nations are uneasy with each other having different ideas for what Korea should be, but both nations do want a joint Korea. Looking at a map of the energy consumption by the two nations there is a line between those who have it and those who do not. These two have shown solidarity as well in the Olympics joining as one nation, but tensions will continue to flare for a long time.
 
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Mercator Puzzle Redux

Mercator Puzzle Redux | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Play this interactive game--move the 15 red countries to their appropriate locations to turn the countries green.  If you give up, you can double click on a red country to locate it (but it will turn blue)." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

The old link to this map quiz no longer works but here is a new version.  This online game where you return the “misplaced” country on the map is more than just and exercise in locating places (there are many online map quizzes for that sort of activity).  What makes this one unique is that as you move the country further north or south the country expands or contracts according to how that country would be projected if that were its actual location on a Mercator map.  This is a great way to introduce the importance of map projections.

 

Tags: map projections, mapping, cartography.

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allbuild.construction's comment, February 14, 2018 12:33 AM
good
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 16, 2018 9:22 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance; Patterns and Trends
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 2018 7:18 PM
This is an interesting quiz to test your world geography skills. It gives you the shape of a country in red and you have to place the shape on the correct country. If you can't find the correct country, just double tap the shape and it will show you which country it belongs to. This was definitely a challenge for me since I only got two of the countries correct. I found particular difficulty with locating the smaller countries with less features that stand out. Although I only got two answers right, I did enjoy this map quiz because it helped me to realize that I should brush up on my world geography skills more to help me stay informed with what's going on in the world.