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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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U.S. Counties Vary by Their Degree of Partisan Prejudice

U.S. Counties Vary by Their Degree of Partisan Prejudice | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A guide to the most—and least—politically open-minded counties in America
Seth Dixon's insight:

I would like to start off by saying that I've lived in Red America and Blue America, and I love the people and places of both.  This is a fascinating set of maps because it isn't just about where are the Republicans and Democrats--we've all seen those maps.  More important to to me is attempting to discern where people can still see their neighbors as neighbors, even if they strongly disagree politically.  "In general, the most politically intolerant Americans, according to the analysis, tend to be whiter, more highly educated, older, more urban, and more partisan themselves."

 

 

GeoEd TAGS: electoral,  political, mapping.

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Italy’s practically perfect food

Italy’s practically perfect food | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Pound for pound, Parmigiano-Reggiano can compete with almost any food for calcium, amino acids, protein and vitamin A – and is prescribed by doctors to cure ailments."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this article focuses often on the nutritional aspects of Parmigiano-Reggiano, I want people to notice the understated importance of place and the cultural ethos surrounding the production of this product. True, it is an economic industry for the region, but it is also a defining cultural characteristic of the place and a way of life. The place makes the product and the product makes the place. 

 

GeoEd Tags: culture, place, Italy, Europe, food, food production, agriculture.

Scoop.it Tags: culture, place, ItalyEurope, regions, foodfood production, agriculture.

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Why Asia is the center of the world again

"Asians don't think of themselves as Asian, but as the new Silk Roads re-emerge and propel Asia to the center of the world economy, Asians are rediscovering their greatness and forging a new Asian identity for the 21st century."

Seth Dixon's insight:

When discussing global economic growth, it is impossible not to mention Asia. Parag Khanna is the author of the book, The Future is Asian, and in this TED talk he highlights how Asia is growing.  More importantly, he looks at how discrete Asian cultures are becoming more intermixed as the economic infrastructure of Asia becomes increasingly interconnected (a summary article is titled, We are all Asians Now).  His 2009 TED talk, Mapping the Future of Countries, about border conflicts, is an APHG classic.       

 

GeoEd Tags: regions, political, globalization, culture, economic, TED, video.

Scoop.it Tags: regionspolitical, globalization, culture, economic, TED, video.

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Kosovo-Serbia land swap could end conflict – or restart war

Kosovo-Serbia land swap could end conflict – or restart war | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A land swap proposal between Kosovo and Serbia could end the last ethnic conflict of the Yugoslav Wars, or it could reignite it. The proposal involves swapping Serbian-majority district of Mitrovica in north Kosovo, and the Albanian-majority Presevo Valley, in southwest Serbia. The deal excludes 6 Serbian-majority municipalities within Kosovo."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Land swaps are about fixing problematic borders--and we know that the world is full of problematic, contentious, and disputed borders.  Yet land swap are incredibly rare because it upends the status quo.  A few years back Belgium and Netherlands swapped some land, but more often then not, calls to simply give land to another country just because the land appears to be controlled by the 'wrong' country usually go unanswered.  This proposed swap is especially intriguing because (to an objective outside observer) it could benefit both countries and lead to a mutual recognition of their shared border.  This BBC podcast explores local impacts and opinions about borders, ethnic identity, and place.   

 

GeoEd Tags: borders, political, territoriality, unit 4 political, Serbia, Kosovo, Europe.

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Spotify data shows how music preferences change with latitude

Spotify data shows how music preferences change with latitude | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The farther from the equator, the greater the seasonal swings."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I’m not posting this in spite of its controversial nature—I am sharing this precisely because it raises eyebrows.  Many have read this and see elements of environmental determinism while simultaneous recognizing some of its core assumptions.  Arctic communities have devastatingly high suicide rates that most agree is in part impacted by the cold weather, the lack of sunshine, or in other words, the physical environment.

  

Questions to Ponder: How much environmental determinism actually is in this research and its assumptions?  How much does latitude impact the human condition?  How much of a factor is the environment in shaping cultural patterns?  How would you adapt to the physical environment if you lived north of the the Arctic Circle? 

 

GeoEd Tags: environment, musicArcticenvironment adapt, unit 1 geoprinciples.

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The last Blockbuster: 'I'm proud that we've survived'

The last Blockbuster: 'I'm proud that we've survived' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The company was founded in 1985 in Dallas, Texas, and it was worth billions of dollars at its peak, employing dozens of thousands of people. It was so popular across the US that, in 1989, a new store was opening every 17 hours. The rapid rise of digital services such as Netflix, which launched in 1999, and online retailers, like Amazon, made Blockbuster's video and DVD business model practically obsolete."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In my neighborhood, as in neighborhoods around America, there is an old Blockbuster building that is used to sell fireworks before the 4th of July and Halloween paraphernalia in October.  Most of the year however the property is a vacant lot where you might find police officers filling out their paperwork in the parking lot.  If video killed the radio star, Netflix killed the Blockbuster storeCreative destruction leaves littered industries that, because of technological innovations, are no longer viable.  

In addition to technological changes, some product shifts hint at societal and demographic changes (see this witty article about the demise of mayo). 

GeoEd TAGS: globalization, industry, economic.

Scoop.it Tags: globalizationindustry, economic.

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Petition calls for U.S. to give Northwest Angle to Canada

Petition calls for U.S. to give Northwest Angle to Canada | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There's a petition that calls for the United States government to adjust the border near Manitoba to give Canada the geographic oddity known as the Northwest Angle."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Enclaves and exclaves are often bizarre examples that test the normal rules regarding the political organization of space.  Historical quirks, landform oddities, competing national goals, and irregular demographic patterns mean that the world is filled strange little case studies about places that seem to defy our normal expectations.  However, the most enduring rule seems to be this: never voluntarily give up territory that you can easily control. 

 

GeoEd TAGS: borders, politicalterritoriality, USA, Canada.

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U.S.-Mexico border: An interactive look at the barriers that divide these two countries

U.S.-Mexico border: An interactive look at the barriers that divide these two countries | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What is along the nearly 2,000 miles of border that divides the U.S. from Mexico?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map allows users to fly over the length of the U.S.-Mexico border.  At key locations you can see how the border is part of communities and an integral part of the economic and social of these cities.  Borders, while on the surface may seem to only divide, often unite people together.  All borders are semi-permeable and this interactive highlights some of the connections across this particular border that is perpetually under intense political scrutiny.   

 

GeoEd Tags: Mexico, Political, borders, North America.

Scoop.it Tags: Mexico, borders, politicalNorth America.   

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 11 February, 12:49
Political geography
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Manila Times Gives China The Finger With Its Own “Nine Dash Line” Map

Manila Times Gives China The Finger With Its Own “Nine Dash Line” Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Philippines’ oldest newspaper recently made what could be considered a provocative gesture towards China regarding its notorious nine-dash-line."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've shared some more substantial resources about maritime claims in the South China Sea than this flippant political cartoon.  Still, this cartoon beautifully illustrates a geopolitical perspective quite powerfully.  As always, use your own discretion when sharing resources in your own classroom (my college students love this). 

 

GeoEd Tags: borders, Political, conflict, water, Philippines, China.

Scoop.it Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, PhilippinesChina.

  

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The Man Behind Most of the Ski Maps in America

The Man Behind Most of the Ski Maps in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The ski trail map at your local mountain was probably painted by James Niehues. Now you can see his life's work in one beautiful book."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This new book looks to be a wonderful cartographic coffee table piece.  Good cartography lies at the intersection of rigorous scientific data display and an aesthetic touch of beauty. 

 

GeoEd Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art.

Scoop.it Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art.

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Iqaluit’s population turns to Amazon Prime

Iqaluit’s population turns to Amazon Prime | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Sky-high food prices in the North have led many residents of Iqaluit to turn to Amazon Prime to save on necessities. But is that a sustainable solution?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Nunavut is remote...far more remote than most of our students can imagine.  They live over 1,000 miles from any city with half a million people.  The entire territory is enormous, but sparsely populated with only 36,000 people.  Try to image getting commercial goods to such a remote location.  The Canadian government has invested heavily to subsidize systems to get food products and other necessities to Nunavut.  Still, the transportation costs are so high, and the numbers are so few that economies of scale can’t help this situation. 

Enter Amazon Prime in 2005, and the online retail giant began offering free shipping for “Prime” customers for a flat yearly subscription fee (today $99 in the U.S.).  This was simply too good to be true for many customers in far-flung settlements in Nunavut.  Amazon, probably not anticipating the overwhelming transportation costs associated with a place like Nunavut, in 2015 stopped offering Prime membership for Nunavut customers that do not live in the capital city of Iqaluit.  Still, the capital city looks to Amazon Prime more so than the Canadian or territorial government as their lifeline to the global economy.  Some even argue that Amazon Prime has done more to improve the standard of living  and providing food security for Nunavut residents than the government.            

Scoop.it TagsCanada, distanceindigenous, poverty, development, economicfood, food distribution, density.

WordPress TAGS: Canada, distance, indigenous, poverty, development, economic, food distribution, density.

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The Enlightenment Is Working

The Enlightenment Is Working | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Don’t listen to the gloom-sayers. The world has improved by every measure of human flourishing over the past two centuries, and the progress continues, writes Steven Pinker."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great article that only reiterates what was said in Hans Rosling's Book, FACTFULNESS, that the world is getting better. 

Scoop.it Tagsstatistics, development, perspective.

Wordpress Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Renata Hill's comment, 7 December 2018, 21:17
I'm aware that the book was written by the most privileged of people on the planet: a white male. Of course he has a rosy view. For those of without such privilege, especially people of color in poor socio-economic stratas, life is difficult.
#CheckYourself
dustin colprit's curator insight, 10 December 2018, 14:35
It is important for more information providing facts supporting how the world is in fact becoming more enlightened. In today's current society a lot of people gather information from social media and other information outlets that are not always accurate. But their research will often stop here and they will already form an opinion. I think moving away from this and getting more accurate information to people would help the progress of enlightenment. 
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Leading the Location Intelligence Revolution

"As GPS devises, sensors, and drones proliferate, the power of location intelligence increases exponentially. This means LI can bring clarity to the most pressing business challenges – even those that at first glance don’t seem location related. Esri has location down to a science – The Science of Where. Examples from the Bavarian Police Department, Switzerland’s largest retailer, Migros, the Port of Rotterdam, and the European Environment Agency, provide just a taste of the broad scope of challenges that can be tackled through the lens of where."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is a good demonstration of the value of GIS, geospatial technologies, and locational intelligence. 

GeoEd Tags: GIS, esri, video, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

Scoop.it Tags: GIS, ESRIvideo, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

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Catherine Pearce's curator insight, 26 November 2018, 22:02
Clearly illustrates the degree to which Geographic concepts of space are critical to modern systems.
Geography's curator insight, 15 December 2018, 01:31
The Location Revolution
Ivan Valles's curator insight, 5 March, 03:57
A great introductory video that provides real-world examples of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) at work to help create solutions to complex geospatial phenomenon. 
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Connecticut's Changing Landscape

Connecticut's Changing Landscape | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Changing Landscape is a remote sensing-based land cover study that charts landscape changes in Connecticut and portions of New York. It covers the 25-year period from 1985 to 2010 (with in-between dates of 1990, 1995, 2002 and 2006). It includes information on basic land cover, as well as subsidiary analyses of riparian corridor land cover, impervious cover and agricultural field and soil analysis."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This story map, created with the Story Map Journal application in ArcGIS Online, is a great example of how to use the "Story Action" features.  Story Action features can move the map view to a particular location or change what is being displayed on the main stage of the story map.  These can also be used to navigate to a different section of the a story map.

Here are two excellent Story Maps that use "Story Action" features.  Please take some time to explore both of them and note how these features enhance the presentation of this spatial information:

  1. Connecticut's Changing Landscape
  2. Damaged and Defiant: Houston Stories
  3. And just for fun, the Cross-Section of elevation along the meridians.

 

Scoop.it Tagsurban ecology, mappingESRIStoryMap.

WordPress TAGS: urban ecology, mapping, esri, storymap.

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Gender and Mobility in the Middle East

Gender and Mobility in the Middle East | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The adult daughter of Dubai’s ruler tried to escape a life of stultifying restrictions. She was captured at sea, forcibly taken back, and has not been heard from since. For all its megamalls, haute cuisine and dizzying skyscrapers, Dubai can flip at speed from international playground to repressive police state."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Both of these particular case studies are incredibly interesting but I want to talk about how this is connected to a larger cultural and political issue: that of female mobility in Persian Gulf countries.  The ability to move freely without familial supervision or approval is something that adults in most countries take for granted, but that is not the case in some countries in the Middle East.  How we experience place is dependent of our mobility—this is why there is no one singular geography or story of any given place, but there are many geographies that help to explain a place.  The story of the ‘vanished princess’ of Dubai and the woman seeking a divorce but trapped by her family cast a different light on the glamorous and glitzy reputation of the United Arab Emirates.    

 

GeoEd Tags: culture, cultural norms, gender, mobility, UAE, MiddleEast, political.

Scoop.it Tagsculture, cultural norms, gender, mobility, UAE, MiddleEast, political.

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How an emerging African megacity cut commutes by two hours a day

How an emerging African megacity cut commutes by two hours a day | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The next 15 megacities #2: Could Dar es Salaam’s experiment with Africa’s first ‘gold standard’ bus rapid transit system offer an alternative to a future dependent on private cars?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good article about the critical nature of transportation infrastructure to a growing city in the developing world.  More important than this one article, I want to highlight the entire Guardian series entitled "The Next 15 Megacities." 

In 1975 there were only 3 megacities (cities population over 10 million) in the world.  Today there are 33 megacities and by 2035, there are expected to be 48.  This acceleration is one of the more astounding and important facts about how the world is changing today. This series explores these emerging megacities that will have over 10 million by 2035; overwhelmingly these cities are in Asia.  

 

GeoEd Tags: Tanzania, Africa, urban, transportation, planning, megacities, regions, APHG.

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Language Warriors

Language Warriors | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The three Dixon brothers: one goes about teaching how geography influences global culture while another goes around the world teaching about how language learning improves global culture.  The smart one makes money."

Seth Dixon's insight:

My brother recently he introduced me to his new online course, Learning How to Learn a Language (complete with a really fun book), as well as a companion website.  If you want to improve your language skills, you will find a lot of free resources on his Facebook group (just search Language Warriors) and his website. 

 

In fact, in the Our Story portion of the website, you get the story of what made me go back to grad school and eventually become a geography professor.  My brother, ever the storyteller, explains how this family story relates to the challenges of learning a language. 

 

As you fellow geographers know, learning a new language is a great way to explore the world.  For the next five days, he’s offering geography teachers a 60% discount on his online course and book by clicking here.  I'm loving this course so far and would love to hear about your experiences learning other languages. 

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Macedonia signs NATO accession agreement

Macedonia signs NATO accession agreement | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This comes after Greece backed a deal to rename its neighbour North Macedonia, ending a long row.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Oh, what's in a name?  National pride, fear of irredentist dreams, border disputes and supranational exclusion...that's all.  Ever since the collapse of Yugoslavia, Greece has opposed an independent neighbor using the name "Macedonia" when they have an adjacent region of the same name.  This has be a point of contention, in part, over the historic memory of Alexander the Great and Hellenic grandeur which Greece feels have been wrongfully appropriated.  It is also regarding expansionist ambitions of a "greater Macedonia" so Greece has blocked Macedonia's entry to NATO and the EU.  To appease Greece, lessen international strife, and gain greater access to the global community Macedonia approved this change, but this move has lead to internal strife as many Macedonians feel that this name change is unfair.           

GeoEd Tags: culture, Political, place, toponyms, historical.

Tagsculturepolitical, placetoponyms, historical.

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an older article (2012), but the pattern mentioned here is all the more relevant.  Belize has a much higher Human Development Index ranking that its Central American neighbors such as Guatemala.  That fact alone makes Belize a likely destination for migrants.  Given that Belize was 'British Honduras' during colonial times, English is (still) the official language, but that is changing as increasingly Spanish-speaking immigrants are changing the cultural profile of Belize.      

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, 4 October 2015, 16:49

You won't BELIZE this link.... get it.

I'm hilarious.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, 7 December 2015, 00:48

This country of Belize seems to be a very interesting place. I never knew that in Central America, there was a country who's official language is English. It is made up of a lot of retired British soldiers and North American "sun seekers." Migration into Belize comes from other place in Central America, of its 300,000 person population, 15% are foreign born. It is now becoming a very mixed country and Spanish is making a gain on English. Schools teach in English, but Spanish lessons are mandatory. A  population boom both helps and hurts the economy. Most migrants are of working age and are willing to work low wages in brutal conditions. A lot of Belizeans tell census that they are not working and with Spanish gaining ground, a lot of monopolistic people are losing jobs to those who are bilingual. Although there are frictions between ethnic groups, in general things are good and political party lines are not divided by ethnicity. 

Lisa Lui's curator insight, 2 February, 15:56
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Beautiful Maps of the World's Watersheds

Beautiful Maps of the World's Watersheds | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Nothing is more fundamental to life than water - so see the world's watersheds like never before with these colorful and absolutely stunning maps.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love the cartographic design of these three maps that shows the importance of river basins. In this one in particular, highlights the Danube and Volga river basins as the most extensive river basins in their regions. For countries in the Danube basin without a coastline, these fluvial connections are critical. The Volga river basin is enormous, but the fact that it flows into the Caspian Sea limits the natural advantage of this river system (this shows exactly why the Volga-Don Canal was such a massive project during the Soviet era).

Often we focus on political boundaries to define regions, but watersheds are natural ecological regions that shape transportation and trade connections.    

 

Scoop.it Tags: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

WordPress TAGS: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

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Steve Dann's curator insight, 7 May, 13:59
Great map - useful
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Language shapes the way we think

"There are about 7,000 languages spoken around the world -- and they all have different sounds, vocabularies and structures. But do they shape the way we think? Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky shares examples of language -- from an Aboriginal community in Australia that uses cardinal directions instead of left and right to the multiple words for blue in Russian -- that suggest the answer is a resounding yes. 'The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is,' Broditsky says. Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Sense of direction, numerical concepts, gendered traits, even the colors that we perceive with our own eyes...all these are shaped by the language(s) we speak.  If language shapes how an individual shapes their own worldview, a cultural group's worldview is also powerfully impacted by the language that frames how they think.  

 

Scoop.it Tags: languagecultureTED, video.

WordPress TAGS: language, culture, TED, video.

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The Mysterious Life (and Death) of Africa’s Oldest Trees

The Mysterious Life (and Death) of Africa’s Oldest Trees | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Learn about one of the world's most iconic tree species, the baobab tree, and discover why these endangered trees might be on their way to extinction—or might outlive us all."

Seth Dixon's insight:

So are the endangered baobab trees victims of the effects of climate change?  The baobab, which has made so many wax poetic, is undergoing a steep decline.  Although scientists are unsure of the reasons and possible solutions, this is a nice piece exploring the cultural and ecological significance of one of the more magnificent trees on our planet.      

 

GeoEd Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Africa,political ecology, Botswana.

 Scoop.it Tags: biogeography, environmentecologyAfrica, political ecology, Botswana.

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99 Good News Stories You Probably Didn’t Hear About in 2018

99 Good News Stories You Probably Didn’t Hear About in 2018 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the last 12 months, the global media has been focused on a lot of bad news. But there were other things happening out there too: conservation successes, huge wins for global health, more peace and tolerance, less war and violence, rising living standards, some big clean energy milestones, and a quiet turning of the tide in the fight against plastic. Stories of human progress, that didn’t make it into the evening broadcasts, or onto your social media feeds.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world isn't all sunshine and rainbows, but far too often the news will give us an overly pessimistic viewpoint about the world (as mentioned in Hans Rosling’s Book, FACTFULNESS).  Slow, incremental progress isn't dramatic enough to make the headlines, and consequently we often miss the evidence that will demonstrate the ways in which the world is improving.  This article wrapping up some positive news from 2018 then, is a welcome bit of news that might change how we perceive some aspects of world.  

 

Scoop.it Tagsstatistics, development, perspective.

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Using BatchGeo

"Quick tutorial on using BatchGeo to create a map using your own spreadsheet (Excel) data."

Seth Dixon's insight:

BatchGeo is incredibly easy to use mapping platform...think of it as GIS-lite, but only for simple points on a map (no lines or polygons). If you have a spreadsheet full of point data, you can make a map with your own data. You can grab data straight from an online list (like Wikipedia), but you can also use spreadsheets, databases, or any other tab delimited dataset.

Scoop.it Tagsmapping, CSV, edtech.

WordPress TAGS: mapping, edtech.

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OPEC's Worst Nightmare: Permian Is About to Pump a Lot More

OPEC's Worst Nightmare: Permian Is About to Pump a Lot More | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An infestation of dots, thousands of them, represent oil wells in the Permian basin of West Texas and a slice of New Mexico. In less than a decade, U.S. companies have drilled 114,000. Many of them would turn a profit even with crude prices as low as $30 a barrel. OPEC’s bad dream only deepens next year, when Permian producers expect to iron out distribution snags that will add three pipelines and as much as 2 million barrels of oil a day."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Overall global commodity prices are impacted by countless local production costs. A large shift in how business is done in one place (in this example, Texas' Permian Basin) can have reverberating impacts on the local productions of other places that focus on that same global commodity (OPEC).  

GeoEd Tags: energy, resources, economic, political ecology.

Scoop.it Tagsenergy, resources, economic, political ecology.

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