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Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy

Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In [recent years], the South’s 150-year reverence for the Confederacy was shaken. Public officials responded to the national mourning and outcry by removing prominent public displays of its most recognizable symbol [the flag]. It became a moment of deep reflection for a region where the Confederate flag is viewed by many white Southerners as an emblem of their heritage and regional pride despite its association with slavery, Jim Crow and the violent resistance to the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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Treathyl Fox's comment, 17 August 2017, 15:22
Nobody in Iraq is debating the pulling down of the statue of Saddam Hussein. It's about what his statue "represented" to a people. It's the same thing with the Confederate symbols. America has an “80%” minority population. (The 80% is a joke.) From the Native Americans to anybody else in that percentage, you won't hear any of them arguing to defend the Confederacy as their “history” and “heritage”. Get real!
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, 13 September 2017, 01:57

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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New Orleans to remove prominent Confederate statues and monuments

New Orleans to remove prominent Confederate statues and monuments | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Statues to Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee and P.G.T. Beauregard and Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis will be removed.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I find issues such as these endlessly fascinating because it the cultural politics behind the shaping of the landscape are so evident. The cultural landscape clearly isn't just an innocent reflection of the society, but is actively constructed and contested.  Some, including the NOLA mayor, claim that it isn't political, but preserving or reconfiguring a place's public cultural heritage is always political.

 

Tags: monuments, New Orleansthe Southurban, architecture, landscape.

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, 27 April 2017, 15:15
So long as they are not destroyed. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, 9 February 2018, 02:47
It is interesting to see the cultural and political implications of the removal of monuments to the Confederacy.  It is also interesting to see how ethnicity and race come into play on this issue.  On the one hand, the mostly black population of New Orleans sees these monuments as celebrating an institution of abuse, exploitation, and white supremacy that likely impacted a majority of their ancestors.  These people voted overwhelmingly for politicians who promised to remove these symbols of the movement that aimed to preserve that institution.  On the other hand, there are people in the community that view the removal of these monuments as the erasure of the city's history.  It is a sensitive topic for many, but it is important that we remember the past with out celebrating negative parts of it. 
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Investing in Monumental Architecture

Investing in Monumental Architecture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

City Hall in Philadelphia is a fantastic example of using architecture to create civic pride by investing in iconic, public buildings. Monumental architecture helps to create a sense of place and communal identity. This building has open air access, making the public feel that this is more their building."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Question to Ponder: Is it "worth it" for government's to invest taxpayer dollars on ornate architecture? 

 

Tags: space, monumentsurban, architecture, place, landscape.

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Unlocking The National Mall

Unlocking The National Mall | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Lisa Benton-Short, author of The National Mall: No Ordinary Public Space talks about the overlooked urban National park sites, getting inspired by her own neighbourhood, and more.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The National Mall has been transformed so much in that last 200 years.  Lisa Benton-Short, in this interview about her book says, "The Mall has been a place where I connect to American history and identity, and our country’s founding principles and ideals. It is place where you can feel the power of the monuments and memorials, the legacy of events, marches and protests. The Mall is an incredibly meaningful place. This book is the result of my intellectual curiosity as a scholar, but also my personal attachment to this place."

 

Tags: historicalspace, monumentsplace, landscape.

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ringacrux's comment, 27 August 2016, 06:14
Interesting...!!
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A Graphic Guide to Cemetery Symbolism

A Graphic Guide to Cemetery Symbolism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
To convey the lives of the people buried beneath them, and the expectations for what comes after death, symbolism has long been part of tombstones. Below is our guide to some of the most prevalent cemetery symbols. Take it along on your next wander through the necropolis!


Tag: cemetery, monumentslandscape.

Seth Dixon's insight:

A good friend of mine always calls October 1st, the first day of Halloween.  Enjoy exploring the geography of cemeteries!

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asli telli's curator insight, 15 October 2015, 06:44

#cemetery #symbols might alleviate #pain of #families...#Ankaradayız

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, 7 November 2015, 15:04

unit 3...I also shared a bit of this during unit 2 when we looked at CDR

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, 25 December 2015, 16:01

When you explain the symbolism, graveyards don't seem as spooky.  :)

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Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong.

Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
False history marginalizes African Americans and makes us all dumber.


Tags: raceconflict, racism, historical, the Southlandscape, monuments.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Admittedly, I've got a thing for monuments in the cultural landscape.  This is a very nice article for a historical geographer on how memory and heritage are enshrined in the landscape; this process politicizes history in ways that shape the national narrative, and that shapes how we think in past.   Using historical geography to understand the debates in the news?  No way!!  Here James Loewen writes in the Washington Post on the topic for a general audience. 

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LoisCortez's curator insight, 3 July 2015, 06:05

well

ed alvarado's comment, 4 July 2015, 05:31
Thats amazing
Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, 5 August 2015, 23:22

Admittedly, I've got a thing for monuments in the cultural landscape.  This is a very nice article for a historical geographer on how memory and heritage are enshrined in the landscape; this process politicizes history in ways that shape the national narrative, and that shapes how we think in past.   Using historical geography to understand the debates in the news?  No way!!  Here James Loewen writes in the Washington Post on the topic for a general audience. 

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Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments

Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Ever since I researched the meanings of monuments in the cultural landscape in Mexico City, I’ve been fascinated by the cultural politics of memory and heritage. The removal of a statue is a cultural 180, acknowledging what was once honored and revered is now something that is not worthy of that distinction. This sort of change is not without protests on both sides and a cultural rearticulation of who 'we' are when 'we' make a public memorial."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Cecil Rhodes was the namesake for the Rhodes scholarship at Oxford University and the colonial names of Zambia (Northern Rhodesia) and Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia).  He was deeply connected to British colonialism and was one of the most ambitious colonizers that expanded the British Empire.  This week a statue of Cecil Rhodes on the University of Cape Town campus was removed.  See the BBC article, Yahoo News!, and PRI podcastfor more details


Questions to Ponder: Why do you think this monument to Cecil Rhodes was established in 1934?  Why was it removed in 2015?  What does this say about South African politics and culture?  How might we characterize the supporters and opponents of the statue?


Tags: South Africa, Africa, historical, colonialism, political, landscape.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, 15 April 2015, 02:41

There's a lesson here in the symbols of conflict resolution....what symbolic monuments do we have to move to solve social conflicts?

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, 30 October 2015, 10:50

The removal of an historical statue, is a broader reflection of what the population of a particular place is thinking. Who a people choose to honor, is a statement of the ideals they hope to espier to. For many people in South Africa, Cecil Rhodes is a symbol of racist colonial tendencies. You can not separate Rhodes from the age of western imperialism. He was one of the leading figures in the scramble for Africa in the late 19th century. In the United States we have seen a similar push to remove statues of historical figures with connections to slavery and racism. Many have called for the removal of statues honoring confederate leaders such as Jefferson Davis or Robert E Lee. The push has even spread to figures beyond those directly connected to the confederacy. The democratic party has removed the names of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson from there annual party dinners. There connections with slavery and Native American treatment are just too much for some outraged democrats to handle. I am uneasy about the removals of these statues. History can never be erased. It is futile, to even attempt to do such a thing. Historical figures should be judged by the context of the times in which they lived. It is unfair to judge Thomas Jefferson by the standards of our modern age  society. The overt political correctness is troubling to say the least. It is a whitewash of history.

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How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood

How a Buddhist shrine transformed a neighborhood | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Sometimes, rehabilitating a rough neighborhood is a tough process. But in one West Coast American city, it was as simple as adding a Buddha statue.  Since the statue's installation, a street corner has been transformed from a notorious eyesore to a daily prayer spot for local Vietnamese Buddhists.  For this Geo Quiz, we're looking for the city where this shrine is located — can you name it?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This podcast is a great glimpse into an urban transformation that took place without any central planning nor can the changes be classified as gentrification. 


Tags: neighborhood, place, culture, economic, urban.

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Burning Man and Ephemeral Geographies

"An aerial perspective on Burning Man 2013, in Black Rock Playa, NV"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This annual arts festival with a strong counter-cultural ethos literally is an experiment in producing alternative urban and cultural geographies that reject normative regulations embedded within societies. These geographies created last only about a week, as an escape from the regular strictures of society. Burning Man celebrates alternative spiritualities and creates monuments to impermanence while allowing people to wear zany costumes. Many feel that in leaving behind ‘the real world’ they find their true home at Burning Man. The ephemeral alternative geographies then fade back into the desert but not without creating a visually remarkable place. Some feel that the festival has become too popular and famous to be what it truly was intended to be as the rich and famous descend on the playa as well.


Questions to Ponder: Part of Burning Man’s success is due to its impermanence; if this community were created to exist year-round, would it still work? Why or why not? Why do festivals like this attract so many? What does it culturally say about the participants and the societies that they leave behind?


Tags: communityplace, architectureimages, art, landscape.

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Barbara Goebel's curator insight, 13 September 2014, 16:58

Fascinating topic for research...connect it to ecology themes, economics, psychology...what else?

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Issues with Ukrainian Nationalism

Issues with Ukrainian Nationalism | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Images of toppled statues notwithstanding, 'revolution' has never been the right word to describe recent events in Kiev. Ukraine, after all, has been here before. At the heart of the country’s present struggle is its resistance to any 'strategic partnership' with Russia and its understanding of Europe as a potential economic and political savior from corrupt government. But the tensions between East and West -- both psychological and geographic -- are deeply rooted in Ukraine's national identity. Those Ukrainians most concerned about their country’s future would do well to recognize that identity’s inherent fragility. The original generation of Ukrainian nationalists suffered precisely for their failure to do so."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This image (hi-res here) and those like it captured me while I was looking for more information on Ukraine's opposition leaders


Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, devolution.

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Amy Marques's curator insight, 24 April 2014, 16:43

The situation in Ukraine with the tensions between the East and West are something that could possibly cause WWIII, and that is something that fears a lot of people. The former power of the Soviet Union and corrupt government is embedded in Ukraine's national identity with many different ethnic groups speaking different languages.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, 14 December 2015, 17:39

This image that we see here is astonishing. The Maidan (Independence Square)  in Kiev is a beautiful place and to see it look like this is breathtaking (in a bad way). The whole problem with this situation is, you have the Ukrainian Nationalists living on the West that want to be part of the EU and you have the Ukrainian Pro Russians living on the East that want to be part of Russia. Due to protesting at Maidan, because of Yanukovych not signing  an agreement with the EU, the Police, Berkut and Titushky are called in to take care of the situation and a lot of this led to violence between the weaponized forces and the pretty much defenseless protesters. The problem is, half the country wants to be free from "tyranny" and have the free lives of Europeans, while the other half see's themselves as part of Russia and nothing else. 

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Incredible Landscapes Carved Into Books

Incredible Landscapes Carved Into Books | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Artwork by GUY LARAMEE   Hailing from Quebec, fellow Canadian Guy Laramee is a man with many talents. Not only is he a very accomplished painter and sculptor, but Guy is also a h...

 

These are some amazing pieces of art that (mainly) depict desert landscapes.  What a great 'hook' for introducing places such as Petra, Jordan or the Buddhist statues of Afghanistan.  Also, in teaching about elevation and countour lines, this would provide a nice visually intuitive way to convey that concept to students, as each page represents a step up in elevation. 

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Burning Man at 25 years

Burning Man at 25 years | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 25th Burning Man festival, with a theme of "Rites of Passage," took place Aug. 29 to Sept. 5, 2011, 120 miles outside Reno, Nev., in the Black Rock Desert, its home since 1990.

 

This link shows counter-cultural festivals, alternative spiritualities and monuments to impermanence.  Why do festivals like this attract so many?  What does it culturally say about the participants and the society they leave behind?

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Donald Dane's comment, 10 December 2013, 15:21
A CRAZY HIPPY EVENT HELD IN THE DESERT OF NEVADA. ill be going next year though looked out of this world. this land has a very unique shape and can be seen from google earth as this perfect circle formation.
Derian Brown's curator insight, 10 November 2014, 02:40

This article shows the 25th Burning Man Festival held in its usually location. A true cult following.

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Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments

Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The protests in Charlottesville, VA in August 2017 were all about Confederate statues, and they were never about monuments all at the same time.  This video from HBO’s Vice news has some f-bombs, but frankly, that isn’t the most disturbing content of this unflinching look into the Alt-Right/White nationalist protests and the subsequent counter-protests.  Despite the graphic display of violence, overt racism, and coarse language, I find the video incredibly illuminating and insightful.  It is hard to sanitize and sugar-coat the facts and still give an accurate portrayal of these events.

As I said, it’s about the statues, but not truly.  At stake is the control over public space and the normative messages within the cultural landscape.  Who decides what history gets etched into our public squares?  What are the meanings within this landscape?  Even 20 years ago, the thought of marshalling political power in Southern cities and states to remove Confederate statues was unthinkable what these symbols meant is different then what they were mean today.  Modern southern politicians are seeing that supporting them vigorously is the new lost cause. Could we have a cultural landscape that has no public memorials to the Confederacy in 25 years?  What would that say about the society that restructured the landscape?  The cultural landscape isn’t just a reflection of society; it also shows political, ethnic, cultural and economic struggles to as “who were are” and what our communal values are continually get remade.

The symbols of the Confederacy have long been venerated by some as symbols of southern heritage, but implicitly a white heritage.  Today, many are seeking to create public spaces that foster an sense of inclusion of African Americans into that definition of “who we are” in the public places.  In May 2017, New Orleans removed some of their Confederate statues, and Mayor Mitch Landrieu gave a powerful speech that contextualizes (one perspective on the) historical meanings embedded in these statues.  I find his perspective to be the most appropriate for a South that respects all of its citizens and honors its past.

FURTHER READING:  Geographer Jonathan Leib gives a fantastic analysis of the competing politics of the juxtaposition of Confederate statues and Arthur Ashe in Richmond, VA.  Some geographers (Derek Alderman and Joshua Inwood) in an op-ed argue that this is the time for the Trump administration to explicitly repudiate white nationalism.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I added some links to this old article to include a fifth example, that of Charlottesville, VA. 

 

Tags: monuments, architecturerace, racism, landscape.

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Matthew Austin's curator insight, 18 September 2017, 06:03
This article talks about the cultural significance behind certain monuments, among those being the Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, VA. It provides an interesting context for discussion of the alt right.
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Memorializing Manzanar

Memorializing Manzanar | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“During World War II the US government incarcerated over 110,000 Japanese Americans, in ten different detention centers throughout the United States.  One of these sites was Manzanar; in 1992, Manzanar was declared a National Historic Site. But apart from the cemetery, there was little there. The committee did not want to settle for a staid, sterile museum and so they worked with the National Park Service to rebuild portions of the camp exactly as they had been during the war. The most powerful symbol might be the site’s newest addition, a replica of the women’s latrine with a trough sink and row of five toilets with no dividers between them. It’s a stark reminder of the humiliation felt by many Japanese Americans during their incarceration.  The annual pilgrimage of Japanese-Americans and others will take place on April 29th, 2017.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

How we collectively remember history in the landscape?  Do you erase national embarrassments that open wounds of the past or is the act of memorialization cathartic and part of becoming a better country?  After Pearl Harbor, the U.S. listened to the fears of the public and military officials and interned U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry.  Today, how this history is remembered is deeply important to many groups in the United States.  There are some great images, videos and primary sources in this episode of the 99 Percent Invisible podcast. 

 

Tagspodcast, culture, California, historical, monumentsplace, landscape.

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'Charging Bull' sculptor says New York's 'Fearless Girl' statue violates his rights

'Charging Bull' sculptor says New York's 'Fearless Girl' statue violates his rights | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Arturo Di Modica says ‘advertising trick’ placed in Wall Street before international women’s day infringed artistic copyright
Seth Dixon's insight:

The meanings embedded in the cultural landscape can shift, and often carry meanings that the artists, architects, and planners never intended.  Certain meanings in the landscape are going to be more valuable to particular cultural groups and there will always be attempts to shape the narrative about the meanings of a given place and what it 'should' be.  Power and resistance to power are both deeply ingrained in many landscapes.  

 

Tags: gender, space, monumentsurban, architecture, NYC, place, landscape.

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Historical Figures, Campus Controversies

Historical Figures, Campus Controversies | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Around the world, student activists are demanding that building and statutes commemorating historically figures whose legacies are now seen as morally dubious.

 

A new wave of international student activism has targeted names, mascots, statues and other symbols of historical figures at colleges and universities. Activists argue that the symbols should be removed as offensive reminders of hatred and violence. Many school officials acknowledge the historical complexities, but they argue that a better approach would be to teach students about the morally questionable acts of the past. Still others defend the symbols as harmless traditions.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Everyone who was been on a road trip with me knows I love monuments and statues.  As markers of memory, history, and place, monuments both reflect regional identity and are simultaneouly used to reshape how we think about communal identities.  Consequently, they can be hotly contested or be seen as a great unifying symbol.  This article has some great examples from the news about how identity and heritage are being recontructed with some controversial monuments. 

  • Jefferson Davis at UTexas
  • Brown U and Slave Trade
  • Harvard and 'Veritas'
  • Amherst and its namesake
  • John Calhoun and Clemson/Yale
  • Cecil Rhodes at Oxford and Cape Town

Tags: historical, monuments, landscape.

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Dennis Swender's curator insight, 9 February 2016, 14:49

James Banks' authentic unum eventually becomes the imposed unum, without which progress cannot be measured. 

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History Revisited, Heritage Reshaped

History Revisited, Heritage Reshaped | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Notes on an Imagined Plaque to be Added to the Statue of General Nathan Bedford Forrest, Upon Hearing that the Memphis City Counci has Voted to Move it and the Exhumed Remains of General Forrest and his Wife, Mary Ann Montgomery Forrest, from their Current Location in a Park Downtown, to the Nearby Elmwood Cemetery
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a very insightful podcast that explores some of the many ways that the South is remembered.  History happened, but heritage is carefully crafted, remolded and contested--geographers are especially interested in seeing how these competing visions of heritage are inscribed in the landscape.     


Tags: historical, monuments, the Southlandscape, podcast.

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99 Percent Invisible

Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don't have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I’m not ashamed to admit that I love flags; I enjoy thinking about the cultural, economic and geopolitical symbolism embedded in the flags and what that means for the places they represent.  I share the above video for that purpose, but more importantly because it is an introduction to the audio podcast 99 Percent Invisible with a special ‘behind-the-scenes’ peek and how this podcast on flag design was made (and here is a snarky critique of all U.S. state flags).  Great geography resources rarely fall under the title “Geography” with a capital G.  It takes geographic training to “see the geography” in the world around us.  I’ve recently discovered the 99 Percent Invisible Podcast and while it is not explicitly (or even always) geographic, it is loaded with excellent materials about design and the details of the world around us that often go unnoticed, but deserve greater scrutiny.  For example the episodes on the Port of Dallas as well as reversing of the Chicago River show how the physical and human systems intersect within urban areas.  These two geo-engineering projects also were conceived on in very particular social, economic and technological contexts.

I also loved the episode Monumental Dilemma, about the uncomfortable 1800s New England memorialization of Hannah Duston for scalping Native Americans…this is incredibly awkward culturally as our society and social values have changes over the years.  Do we tear it down? Ignore it?  Apologize?  Since the historical legacy is unsettled, so is the monument.  So I’ll keep listening to the 99 Percent Invisible podcast and please recommend some especially geographic past episodes as I dig through the archives.                

 

Tagspodcast, architecture, TED.

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On St. Patrick’s Day, Mexico remembers the Irishmen who fought for Mexico against the US

On St. Patrick’s Day, Mexico remembers the Irishmen who fought for Mexico against the US | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amid the celebrations this St Patrick's Day, there are also more somber commemorations taking place. In Mexico and in a small town in Galway, Ireland, they are remembering the hundreds of Irishmen who died fighting for Mexico against the United States: the San Patricio Battalion.
Seth Dixon's insight:

On St. Patrick's Day and afterward, many people shared happy pictures of Ireland, and that's lovely but I wanted this story.  This is not a well-known story in the United States because it reveals the cultural prejudice against the Irish that was prevalent in the United States in the 1840s.  I first learned about them in Mexico City, walking by a monument, that memorialized St. Patrick's Battalion.  They were a group of soldiers that deserted from the U.S. army and chose to fight with their Catholic brethren on the Mexican side.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are these historical events not usually mentioned in the U.S. national narrative?  Why is this seen as very significant for Mexican national identity?  What were the 'axes of identity' that mattered most to the those in St. Patrick's Battalion?   

 

Tags ethnicitywar, Mexico, Irish, racismreligion.

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Connor Hendricks's curator insight, 23 March 2015, 20:40

This is a good way to show how countries can work togeter and respect each other. A group of irishmen fought to defend mexico during the Mexican-American war

 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, 23 March 2015, 22:44

This is definitely interesting this breakers down cultural barricades and sets inside differences 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, 22 September 2015, 13:15

The story of the San Patricio Battalion was completely unknown to me. The Mexican War is a largely glossed over event in United States History. Our national narrative seems to jump right from the Jackson years  to the crisis years before the Civil War. When the Mexican War is brought up, it is usually in reference to how it influenced the debate over slavery's expansion into the west. Even more glossed over in our national  narrative is the widespread discrimination aimed at German and Irish immigrants in the mid ninetieth century. The discrimination aimed at the Irish explains this battalions decision  to fight for Mexico. The Irish had more ties to Mexico than the United States. The Irish were often persecuted for their Catholic faith in the United States at that time. Their decision is quite understandable  when viewed in the proper context.   

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Digital mapping uncovers ‘super henge’ that dwarfed Stonehenge

Digital mapping uncovers ‘super henge’ that dwarfed Stonehenge | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every summer solstice, tens of thousands of people throng to Stonehenge, creating a festival-like atmosphere at the 4,400-year-old stone monument. For the 2015 solstice, they will have a bit more room to spread out. A just-completed four-year project to map the vicinity of Stonehenge reveals a sprawling complex that includes 17 newly discovered monuments and signs of a 1.5-kilometre-around ‘super henge’.

The digital map — made from high-resolution radar and magnetic and laser scans that accumulated several terabytes of data — shatters the picture of Stonehenge as a desolate and exclusive site that was visited by few, says Vincent Gaffney, an archaeologist at the University of Birmingham, UK, who co-led the effort."


Tags: Mapping, geospatial, remote sensing, landscape.

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Renata Hill's comment, 16 September 2014, 22:14
Fascinating. Thank you for posting!
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Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims

Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A slice of rock removed from the mainland near the island of Utoeya is the winning design for a memorial to commemorate the victims of Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Monuments are not just in a place...they can create place and place can infuse added meaning to a memorial.  This is a great example of the interplay between memorials, place, artistic and cultural meanings. 

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, 7 March 2014, 08:43

Il 22 luglio 2011 il fanatico cristiano Anders Breivik ha ucciso 69 ragazzi nell'isola di Utøya in Norvegia e procurato la morte di altre 8 persone in un attentato con esplosivo a Oslo. Una tragedia che ha colpito tutto il mondo e ha lasciato impietrita la civilissima Norvegia.

Per ricordare le vittime di questo massacro sarà creato un monumento. Questo il design selezionato. Un monumento che riesce a riprodurre in modo fisico il dolore procurato dall'esperienza di chi ha dovuto provare in prima persona la perdita improvvisa, brutale e permanente di tante persone care.

JoseMªRiveros's curator insight, 7 March 2014, 19:36

Espectacular !!!!

Un trozo de roca retirado de la parte continental cerca de la isla de Utoya. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, 12 March 2014, 15:32

This is a creative and beautiful idea for a monument. I have never come across a design similar to this one. This is a great example of taking advantage of the surroundings around you, such as the water, rocks and trees. 

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The Joe Paterno Statue on Penn State campus

The Joe Paterno Statue on Penn State campus | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I never imagined that this picture would be awkward or evoke such ambivalent feelings within me.  This picture was taken while I was working on my Ph.D. in geography at the Pennsylvania State Unive...

 

As a geographer, much on my career has centered on researching monuments in public spaces and their cultural meanings.  As a Penn State graduate, I felt that it was time for me to write a post about my thoughts on the future of the JoePa statue.  Please let me know what you think in the comment section below.   

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, 15 July 2012, 18:13
It seems that wrong always overshadows good, but people choose to remember what they want. I would hope that the statue and what it stands for is still given the proper respect and not to invoke emotions and memories of the lower side.
Don Brown Jr's comment, 4 September 2012, 03:57
In more than one way a statue can represent the themes or image of the surrounding area serving as an emotional funnel point. Throughout history statues and monuments such as the Colossus of Rhodes have served as a reminder to all who gaze at them of what the idea and values of the surrounding area are. In the case of Penn State the football legacy, the reputation of the school, the surrounding community and state as well as personal pride were all intertwined into this statue of Joe Paterno. Indeed statues carry a significant share of the culture, history and emotional attachments individuals have to a particular landscape and when you remove that image you risk creating a void in the area and peoples conception of it. Presently, the image Penn State will need to fill this vacuum remains to be discovered.
Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, 19 December 2013, 04:09

The significance of Joe Paterno at Penn State was huge. At one point Joe Paterno was the heart beat of the Penn State football team and to fans. This statue meant a lot to Penn State fans and all college football fans all over. Until a sex scandal broke out that involved Joe Paterno although he did not commit any sexual acts people started to think differently about him and the program he was running. A statue that symbolized greatness at one time now is only looked at as a terrible crime.

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World's most controversial monuments

World's most controversial monuments | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Prodigal spending, political disputes and divisive revolutionaries have made these historical markers stand out for more than their physical enormity.

 

Admittedly, I have a 'thing' for statues.  Their powerful to redefine place and to mold communal identity is powerful.  Some of these attempts to both redefine place and mold a communal identity can spark controversies as the narrative that the monument embodies can be perceived as marginalizing alternative narratives or groups.   

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