Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Iqaluit’s population turns to Amazon Prime

Iqaluit’s population turns to Amazon Prime | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Sky-high food prices in the North have led many residents of Iqaluit to turn to Amazon Prime to save on necessities. But is that a sustainable solution?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Nunavut is remote...far more remote than most of our students can imagine.  They live over 1,000 miles from any city with half a million people.  The entire territory is enormous, but sparsely populated with only 36,000 people.  Try to image getting commercial goods to such a remote location.  The Canadian government has invested heavily to subsidize systems to get food products and other necessities to Nunavut.  Still, the transportation costs are so high, and the numbers are so few that economies of scale can’t help this situation. 

Enter Amazon Prime in 2005, and the online retail giant began offering free shipping for “Prime” customers for a flat yearly subscription fee (today $99 in the U.S.).  This was simply too good to be true for many customers in far-flung settlements in Nunavut.  Amazon, probably not anticipating the overwhelming transportation costs associated with a place like Nunavut, in 2015 stopped offering Prime membership for Nunavut customers that do not live in the capital city of Iqaluit.  Still, the capital city looks to Amazon Prime more so than the Canadian or territorial government as their lifeline to the global economy.  Some even argue that Amazon Prime has done more to improve the standard of living  and providing food security for Nunavut residents than the government.            

Scoop.it TagsCanada, distanceindigenous, poverty, development, economicfood, food distribution, density.

WordPress TAGS: Canada, distance, indigenous, poverty, development, economic, food distribution, density.

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Here's How America Uses Its Land

Here's How America Uses Its Land | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 48 contiguous states alone are a 1.9 billion-acre jigsaw puzzle of cities, farms, forests and pastures.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of 15 maps on how land is used in the 48 contiguous U.S. states is a phenomenal resource to visualize how we use our land (admittedly this does exclude Alaska and Hawaii, but given that Alaska's land use patterns can skew the patterns considerably).  This is especially useful in agricultural units, but has many other applications. 

Scoop.it Tags: agriculture, food production, land userural, USA.

WordPress TAGS: agriculture, food production, land use, rural, USA.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, 5 October 2018, 14:11
Good for map analysis practice
K Rome's curator insight, 7 October 2018, 00:36

This set of 15 maps on how land is used in the 48 contiguous U.S. states is a phenomenal resource to visualize how we use our land (admittedly this does exclude Alaska and Hawaii, but given that Alaska's land use patterns can skew the patterns considerably).  This is especially useful in agricultural units, but has many other applications. 

Scoop.it Tags: agriculture, food production, land userural, USA.

WordPress TAGS: agriculture, food production, land use, rural, USA.

Ivan Valles's curator insight, 5 March, 04:06
Forthcoming comments....
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Drought and Famine

In which John Green teaches you a little bit about drought, which is a natural weather phenomenon, and famine, which is almost always the result of human activity. Throughout human history, when food shortages strike humanity, there was food around. There was just a failure to connect those people with the food that would keep them alive. There are a lot of reasons that food distribution breaks down, and John is going to teach you about them in the context of the late-19th century famines that struck British India.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Famine is exacerbated by natural factors such as drought, but those only stress the system, they rarely cause the actual starvation.  The real failure is that the political/economic systems created by governments and how they handle stains in the food production/distribution systems.  Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes.  Many of the recent examples have come from collectivation strategies that governments have implemented (currently Venezuela, but historically the Soviet Union and China).  The Choices program has some good resources about teaching current events with the famines today.

 

Tags: food, povertyhistoricalcolonialism, economic, political, governance, agriculture, crash course

 

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Where our food came from

Where our food came from | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Explore the geographic origins of our food crops – where they were initially domesticated and evolved over time – and discover how important these 'primary regions of diversity' are to our current diets and agricultural production areas."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly rich website with great interactive maps, dynamic charts, and text with rich citations.  This is one of those resources that an entire class could use as a starting point to create 30+ distinct project.  This is definitely one of the most important and best resources that I've shared recently, one that I'm going to use in my class.  Where did a particular crop originally come from?  Where is it produced today?   How do these historic and current agricultural geographies change local diets and economies around the world?  All these issues can be explored with this interactive that includes, but goes beyond the Columbian Exchange

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG, unit 5 agriculture, globalizationbiogeography, ecology, diffusion.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, 16 June 2016, 23:43

Great interactive map to illustrate the source regions of the world and foods that originated there. Hover over each region and the foods of that area popup.


Rory McPherson's curator insight, 3 July 2016, 22:39

Very informative! It's great to learn where our food comes from. The author is able to communicate this information through simple but effective maps and visualizations.

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NESTVAL 2015: The Geography of Food

"My 2015 NESTVAL presentation in an APHG session on the geography of food."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this presentation (PPTx file here), I share some of my favorite resources for teaching the content as well as some pedagogical tips.  Some of these resources are found in an article I wrote for National Geographic or have been shared on this site earlier.  Here are some pedagogical tips to APHG students about food systems:  

  • Tip#1: Don’t demonize agribusiness or romanticize the family farm. 
  • Tip #2: Use data and maps.  Here is a map in ArcGIS online on rural land use activities with a handy dandy instruction guide, ready to go (many more APHG GeoInquiries from ESRI set to be released soon). 
  • Tip #3: Connect them personally into the web of food systems and show how it impacts them. 
  • Tip #4: Let this be one of those units that connects to all the themes of the course, especially population, culture, political, and the environment.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 10 October 2015, 23:09

Things to consider when teaching about food production from a geographical perspective - remember to link to Biomes.

asli telli's curator insight, 15 October 2015, 06:40

#Food is #geographical and #mobile...

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, 26 January 2017, 18:36
unit 5
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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, 6 August 2015, 02:21

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 6 August 2015, 09:20

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, 6 August 2015, 23:06

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.


Tags: food distributionfoodeconomic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, 10 May 2015, 14:27

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, 10 May 2015, 20:55

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

Robert Slone's curator insight, 19 May 2015, 14:04

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.


Tags: agriculturefood distribution

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Emily Bian's curator insight, 25 March 2015, 21:53

This is a really cool article! I always enjoy looking at food from around the world, so I automatically scooped this when I saw it. This is a article with a slideshow of school lunches around the world. At the very end of the photo slide, there is a photo of an American school lunch which is pretty embarrassing compared to Brazil and Finland. This photo series was taken by SweetGreens, and the school lunches were put together to represent an average school lunch, not necessarily what they have every day. 

They talk about how each country eats what is grown around them, while US is processed food like chicken nuggets and chocolate chip cookie.

I really want to move to Brazil and eat their school lunch, haha! It looks so good. For dessert in Finland, they have a berry crepe on their plate! That's awesome! If you have some free time, then be sure to check this out! 

5) Interdependence among regions of food production and consumption

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, 25 May 2015, 23:46

Summary: This article showed a series of pictures, which showed traditional school lunches of different countries. Greece's lunch included a Mediterranean diet, while Brazil's had rice and beans with greens, and the United States had its classic chicken nuggets, chocolate chip cookie, and mashed potatoes. The goal of this article was definitely to show what foods were incorporated into different cultures and climates.

 

Insight: Food is one example of a cultural trait, and quite a prominent one. Tradition may prohibit or encourage eating a certain kind of food, while long term climate also makes a large difference on the crops traditional grown in a country. 

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, 10 February 2016, 14:16

This is an excellent way to compare the impact that agriculture and culture in general have on our schools! 

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Geography Education | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.
Seth Dixon's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates.   You can hear more about Tristram's work in this TED talk


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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Deborah Jones's curator insight, 25 October 2014, 14:58

PSA

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, 16 November 2014, 04:13

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, 21 November 2014, 17:18

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious

The Awful Reign of the Red Delicious | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For at least 70 years, the Red Delicious has dominated apple production in the United States. But since the turn of the 21st century, as the market has filled with competitors—the Gala, the Fuji, the Honeycrisp—its lead has been narrowing. Annual output has plunged."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The story of the Red Delicious is almost a perfect analogy for the food industry.  It was genetically selected for its marketable skin, an aesthetically sumptuous red.  The skin of the Red Delicious better covers bruises than other varieties and tastes more bitter.  Consumers were buying what the industry promoted and “eating with their eyes and not their mouths.”  But recently there has been a backlash in the United States and more American consumer are seeking out other varieties; meanwhile the apple producers are working on exporting this variety to around the world, but especially into Chinese markets.  


Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, USA

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 09:55

Oh how do I hate these waxy beauties. I remember in elementary school they offered these apples and I took a bite and had never tasted something so evil and wrong. Apples are supposed to be fresh, not tasteless and with no nutrients.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, 12 March 2016, 02:34
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40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada


Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

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Treathyl Fox's curator insight, 26 June 2014, 17:26

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, 22 November 2014, 19:16

With more people than ever living in cities and less people than ever working on farms, the future of our food is in question. The riskiness, labor, low gain,  and negative stereotypes of farmers combined with the fear of food conglomerates has led to a depletion of smaller scale farmers. Brain drain in rural farming areas is depleting the number of younger people willing to work in agriculture. With most of our food production being controlled and overseen by large corporations, people are now questioning the quality of our foods. Recently, the local food movement is educating people on the importance of food produced with integrity and supporting  local businesses.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, 16 March 2016, 19:51

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.  Additionally, here are some maps and chart to understand agriculture and food in Canada

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

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Spoof on Agricultural Standards

Seth Dixon's insight:

These spoofs are just for fun...but they are basic ways to start some conversations about  modern agricultural practices, especially the local and organic movements.  Here is another spoof, mocking paleo and crossfit trends.  

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Josune Erkizia's curator insight, 5 March 2014, 07:49

Very funny

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, 5 March 2014, 08:51

Good for sessions on Animal Welfare and Farm Assurance.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, 11 September 2014, 19:07

unit 5

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Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts'

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Baruch Ben-Yehudah is tackling Prince George’s County’s "food desert" problem. His vegan food truck delivers nourishment to neighborhoods lacking fresh groceries.

Via Natalie K Jensen
Seth Dixon's insight:

What are food deserts?  Why do they form?  What does this Washington Post video suggest about the demographic composition of food deserts?


TagsWashington DC, agriculture, food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic.

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nicole Musset's curator insight, 14 September 2013, 18:55

la terre peut offrir de la nourriture à tous ses habitants;mais les interets personnels,la recherche de profits et l'absence de plus en plus grande de conscience "écolologique"....une personne comme Baruch Ben Yehuda est tres importante pour ceux qui souffrent du manque de ressources.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, 21 September 2013, 03:38

After having just driven across country this year I am very in touch with the fact that this model needs to be replicated across the US.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, 24 October 2013, 18:03

This food truck is bringing healthy, vegan food, to food deserts. A food desert is a place where healthy food is not accesable to the population, which is always impoverished. These people typically rely on unhealthy/cheap foods that are high in fats, preservatives, and sugars. This leads to tremendous health issues for these populations. Sure, this food truck is making a profit but it is also providing a wonderful service to the community, exposure to healthy foods and an alternative to the norm.

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Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving

Here’s What Your Part Of America Eats On Thanksgiving | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every region enjoys pumpkin pie. But beyond that, there are three Americas: The America that disproportionately has apple pie (New England and the Middle Atlantic), the America that has pecan pie and sweet potato pie (the assorted South), and the America that consumes cherry pie (the Midwest and West)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In addition to this list of distinctive Thanksgiving recipes from each state (I'd love to try so many on this list), the NY Times has also produced this list of the most 'Googled' Thanksgiving recipes in each state.  This StoryMap from ESRI is my favorite map of food production, showing where the food on the thanksgiving dinner plate actually came from.  These are very late additions to my favorite Thanksgiving day resources. Happy Thanksgiving everyone, and may yours reflect some some regional distinctiveness and cultural context that you appreciate.   

GeoEd Tags: food, food distribution, food production, agriculture.

Scoop.it Tags: foodfood production, agriculture.

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dustin colprit's curator insight, 7 December 2018, 18:49
It is interesting to see what people from different regions prefer to eat for a holiday that's celebrated across the whole nation. Some of the results can be associated with food production in those regions. But it is still interesting how some choices have continued to remain with improved access and supply of goods. From being in the army I have been stationed at bases in different regions and have gotten to try some of the local dishes mentioned though there are still more I'd like to try. 
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The real reason Amazon buying Whole Foods terrifies the competition

The real reason Amazon buying Whole Foods terrifies the competition | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amazon’s zero-profit strategy is a disaster for anyone who goes up against it.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have more questions than definitive answers, so let's get right to it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How have technological and logistical shifts in various industries made this once unthinkable union workable?  How will a retailer like Amazon change the food industry on the production side of the equation? What are the advantages and disadvantages of creative destruction (eliminating old jobs by creating new ones)?  Who stands to benefit the most, and who are the most negatively impacted?    

 

Tagsindustry, economic, scale, agriculture, food production, agribusiness, food

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Mr Mac's curator insight, 22 June 2017, 14:35
Unit 5 - Commercial Agriculture, Agribusiness, Food Distribution; Unit 6 - Services, Distribution of Services, Service and Technology
mouthpaptops's comment, 24 June 2017, 07:34
good
charlytap's comment, 30 June 2017, 06:29
nice
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Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets

Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets | Geography Education | Scoop.it
During the Depression, cheap, nutritious and filling food was prioritized — often at the expense of taste. Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe, authors of A Square Meal, discuss food trends of the time.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Peanut butter and school lunches became fixtures of American culture during the Depression.  On the flip side, our modern preference for freshness is a reaction against the Depression's obsession to find ways to preserve food for longer amounts of time.  

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood distribution, historical, podcast.

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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Geography Education | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.
Seth Dixon's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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FDH Editor Team's curator insight, 10 March 2016, 00:50

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust). 

 

This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, 10 March 2016, 11:10

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, 12 March 2016, 02:29
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Reefer Madness

Reefer Madness | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There are around 6,000 cargo vessels out on the ocean right now, carrying 20,000,000 shipping containers, which are delivering most of the products you see around you. And among all the containers are a special subset of temperature-controlled units known in the global cargo industry, in all seriousness, as reefers.

70% of what we eat passes through the global cold chain, a series of artificially-cooled spaces, which is where the reefer comes into play."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportationfood distributiontechnology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, 10 October 2015, 23:19

An interesting addition to any study of global trade connections 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, 5 April 2016, 13:06

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportation, food distribution, technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

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With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating

With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores)."


Tags: food distribution, place, food, religion, ethnicity.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This report brings up three interesting tidbits about candy consumption in the United States, but this is also a good article to discuss how businesses should take geography and demographic statistics seriously when crafting their marketing strategies.  

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Ethan Bernick's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 01:29

Each region of the USA varies at different degrees. The distribution of Mormons in Utah greatly increases the amount of candy consumed in the area. This could be a perceived region.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 02:15

Me as a mormon completely understand the desire of candy. Yes alcohol, drugs, tobacco, ect is frowned upon but what intrigues me the most is how candy is so dominant in that region.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 18:08

More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores).

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've posted here several resources about the food systems and the geography of food production and distribution.  In this article for National Geographic Education I share ten of my favorites. 


Tagsfoodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture.

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Claire Law's curator insight, 26 April 2015, 07:01

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, 30 April 2015, 04:15

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, 26 May 2015, 07:10

I absolutely love this article. It touches on many of the most important and challenging issues facing food production in the world, ranging from food manufacturing ethics to global hunger. I think it's interesting how, although we all eat food everyday, we don't think about the many implications associated with the production and consumption of food. To more privileged people, food is not a big deal, as anyone can get food at any time of day. However, for people who are trying to solve the problems associated with food in the modern world or for people who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition, the information presented in this article is extremely important. Brilliant minds can come together to propose potential solutions for all the problems facing food distribution. I can't wait for the day every child can go to bed with a full stomach, and I am willing to do my part to help make that happen.

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Think the McDonald's Menu is the same everywhere?  Think again.  A fantastic geography teacher compiled these images and descriptions of the McDonald's menu from around the world and put them into an ESRI storymap.  This interactive feature shows how a successful global brand like McDonald's should be keenly aware of local tastes and customs.  Some call that "glocalization." 


TagsESRI, foodculturediffusion, globalization, consumption, APHG.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, 18 December 2014, 03:45

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, 22 January 2015, 02:40

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, 23 January 2015, 00:06

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   


Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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dilaycock's curator insight, 19 October 2014, 23:45

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, 24 October 2014, 15:55

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, 16 March 2016, 19:43

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

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HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, 31 July 2014, 15:56

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, 31 July 2014, 16:27

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, 16 March 2016, 19:45

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 

 

Tags: food production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Colombian Exchange is a term that describes the most dramatic biologic transfer in history.  European explorers brought animals and agricultural items from the Old World to the New and subsequently brought back items from the New World back to the Old.  This exchange profoundly reshaped many societies as agricultural diffusion of the potato lead to the changes across northern Europe. 


Tags: agriculture, food production, diffusionhistorical colonialism, Europe

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Gina Panighetti's curator insight, 4 August 2014, 22:35

Columbian Exchange Unit

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, 13 December 2014, 17:57

Potatoes are one of the most widespread foods in the world, due to its resiliency to harsh weather conditions and its ability to grow to large sizes. Potatoes can also be traced to show the beginning forces of globalization. Before modern communication and transportation technology, globalization occurred at a much slower rate. Globalization spread through trade routes in the forms of foods, resources, and therefore cultures and people. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, 16 March 2016, 19:52

The Colombian Exchange is a term that describes the most dramatic biologic transfer in history.  European explorers brought animals and agricultural items from the Old World to the New and subsequently brought back items from the New World back to the Old.  This exchange profoundly reshaped many societies as agricultural diffusion of the potato lead to the changes across northern Europe. 

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, diffusionhistorical colonialism, Europe

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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).

Seth Dixon's insight:

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, 17 November 2013, 11:14

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, 17 November 2013, 17:35

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"