Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The Sounds of the Landscape

The Sounds of the Landscape | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We often think of the only what we can see as a part of the landscape, but often forget that the cultural landscape can be a full sensory experience. The architecture of the Hagia Sophia is recognized as a iconic landmark, but the acoustics of the building are a major part of the creating the experience of being in that place. Once a cathedral, then a mosque, and now a museum, this building is one of the classic examples of sequent occupance. This NPR podcast shows how some have recreated the soundscapes of the Hagia Sophia, back when is was the preeminent medieval Christian place of worship. This YouTube playlist has the Capella Romana’s album, The Lost Voices of the Hagia Sophia.
exfoliatetaffrail's comment, June 5, 7:08 AM
nice
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Amid a Pandemic, Geography Returns with a Vengeance

Amid a Pandemic, Geography Returns with a Vengeance | Geography Education | Scoop.it

As I mentioned in my last Coronavirus post, there are geographic factors and implications everywhere when dealing with this truly global issue that has profoundly local ramifications. True, I am guilty as charged if I stand accused of seeing geography everywhere, but now even non-geographers are seeing geography, place, distance, regions, interactions, and connections as more important than ever. I would like to share three additional resources that point to the centrality of geographic thought to all that is happening these days: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2U5 ;

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How to Recapture the Muslim World’s Lost Hope

How to Recapture the Muslim World’s Lost Hope | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What happened to us? The question haunts us in the Arab and Muslim world. We repeat it like a mantra. You will hear it from Iran to Syria, from Saudi Arabia to Pakistan, and in my own country, Lebanon. For us, the past is a different country, one not mired in the horrors of sectarian killings. It is a more vibrant place, without the crushing intolerance of religious zealots and seemingly endless, amorphous wars.
Seth Dixons insight:
This opinion piece is a somewhat controversial, but that is part of its value. The core of the author’s thesis is that to understand the modern Middle East, especially if one is searching for a way to create a more democratic Middle East, we must look to the past to see how we got there. 1979 is seen here as the pivotal year that changed the trajectory of the Middle East, in large part because of the Islamic Revolution in Iran, but for many other region-wide changes. Questions to Ponder: What were the big shifts that occurred in 1979? What are things that you think that the author gets correct about their historical analysis of the Middle East? What are some positions where you disagree with the author?

Read with links here: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2TM
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GPS Tracking

GPS Tracking | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Maps are powerful tools to demonstrate spatial ideas and concepts. Wolves are territorial, and using GPS trackers to understand this really drives home the point. Here is a similarly fantastic map of an eagle’s flight paths shows the patterns amid noise.
Gilbert C FAURE's comment, March 10, 2:30 PM
did you register on https://info.scoop.it/edu-and-nonprofit, according to my e-mail, then Scoop.it should release your previous posts.
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Tools for Student Projects

Tools for Student Projects | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In many geography classes, teachers will assign students a country to help them gain some depth about one particular country as a way to explore economic, demographic, cultural, political, and environmental issues. These are some data visualization tools that deals with big data; the listed tools are some of my favorite in part because they can easily to incorporated to an ArcGIS StoryMap (especially in the Map Journal template).
Seth Dixons insight:
The Top four include:
1-Dollar Street
2-Observatory of Economic Complexity
3-Population Pyramid dot net
4-Gapminder Tools
See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Sx

ezra low's curator insight, May 7, 6:36 AM
Great tools for teachers and useful classroom lessons can be based around just a couple of these ideas. Gapminder has a great resource that could create an entire lesson sequence around. These tools make it really easy for educators to redefine the learning environment without much effort. Students are able to control their learning journey with some inquiry led learning processes, depending on where he teacher wants to take them. Make sure to look at this and explore the tools that are offered. This tool is really based for human geography in secondary education.
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Delhi riots: City tense after Hindu-Muslim clashes leave 23 dead

Delhi riots: City tense after Hindu-Muslim clashes leave 23 dead | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The deadliest violence in India's capital for decades leaves 23 people dead and scores injured.
Seth Dixons insight:
It is so disheartening to see the news that India is undergoing a wave of religious unrest. As citizen and immigration laws have been enacted that have a religious component to it, many feel that this is unfairly targeting Muslim migrants and refugees. Some see this as the beginning of a delegitimization of Muslim citizenship within India. As people are protesting these laws, there are groups that are also a violently clashing with protesters in the streets. Some are targeting Mosques, and the police have been unable to keep the peace. This is some nasty business that I hate to see anywhere, but if you need an example of how religion can be a centrifugal force in a country, this is a perfect example.  See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2S4
Bruno BK Kesangana's curator insight, March 22, 1:47 PM
article à lire absolument
Bruno BK Kesangana's curator insight, March 22, 2:55 PM
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VIDEO: My Dear Kyrgyzstan

VIDEO: My Dear Kyrgyzstan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Emil is a social media-obsessed entrepreneur in one of the most remote places on earth: An abandoned Soviet mining village in Kyrgyzstan. Emil has returned to put his village on the map as an international tourist destination.
Seth Dixons insight:
This delightful video shows the former Soviet mining town of Jyrgalan and a local entrepreneur that wants to revitalize the village economy, bring in the outside world, and make is home a tourist destination. It serves several purposes for a geography teacher. One, it’s a great portal into a Central Asian country where most of my students don’t have any real reference points. Two, the video highlights important geographic concepts such as tourism’s impact on indigenous cultures and globalization’s impact on previously isolated locations. Three, this is a great case study for a cultural landscape analysis. The video has some incredible juxtapositions; nomads wearing traditional clothes encountering adventure tourists outfitted in Patagonia gear, people in town cutting grass with scythes as well as gas lawn mowers, and traditional architectural styles intermixed with signs of modernity such as satellite antennas. The physical and cultural landscapes in this are absolutely stunning and worth the twelve minutes of your time. See with links on: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2RG
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These students make maps for the Philippines and Belize. They never leave campus to do it.

These students make maps for the Philippines and Belize. They never leave campus to do it. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"With Queen’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ humming in the background, about two dozen students at George Washington University traced skinny lines and square-shaped landmarks on a satellite image of a rural chunk of Mindanao, the second-largest island in the Philippines. They are in the early stages of piecing together a map of the region where half of the country’s food is grown but where most people live in poverty. The students carefully scanned the photos to scope out buildings and roads tucked between thick trees. The task is painstaking but necessary to create an up-to-date map. This corner of the Philippines — like large swaths of the planet — does not have any recent digital maps."


Seth Dixons insight:
Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency and one of the best ways to put geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action. Many high school and college students around the country are learning mapping skills by creating maps for places that aren’t well-mapped and in great need. Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters. Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets. My students and I are working on this over the weekend; can you join in and help? The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now. Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM). The embedded TEDx talk below discusses the advantages of using OSM in geography teaching.  See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Ru
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Mapping the Wind –

Mapping the Wind – | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It is incredibly cold in New England right now. How can maps help us to understand the weather patterns we are facing? How is what we are facing in our community connected to global patterns? Maps help us to contextualize information and understand processes. So to investigate this our freezing wind conditions we will look at a series of online resources.

Dynamic Wind Map of USA (Visualization).
Interactive wind map (Ventusky).
Interactive wind map (WindyTy).
Digital Globe with Wind patterns (Null School)
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Helping Students to Expand Their Worldview

“People cling to outdated ideas, even in the face of new information; this makes our job as educators especially difficult because simply teaching accurate information is not enough. We have to teach our students how to contextualize new information into their expanding worldview in a way that infuses and updates all of their learning.”  https://geographyeducation.org/presentations/tedx/


Seth Dixons insight:
At the same TEDx event where I presented this talk, many other geographers and educators spoke and I was inspired by their dreams, passions, and professional interests.  To see all of these videos, go to: https://geographyeducation.org/presentations/tedx/  
Catherine Pearce's comment, January 13, 7:49 AM
I find many of my students struggle to see past their current experiences.
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South Korea Population in APHG

"This is the 2019 NCGE presentation showing how case studies can be brought into the APHG classroom. In this presentation, South Korea's shifting population trends are used as the example of a case study worth bringing into the classroom."
Seth Dixons insight:
Global fertility rates have been steadily dropping since 1960 (Bloomberg article) and South Korea is probably the best example to use to discuss the rapid shifts in this trend. Above is the 2019 NCGE presentation that shows how to use the National Atlas of Korea in the APHG classroom using population as the prime case study (here are the powerpoint version and the PDF version). Read more with additional links here: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Qg
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Masters of Tradition: A Cultural Journey Across America

Masters of Tradition: A Cultural Journey Across America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"Explore the Masters of Tradition story map. Discover the rich diversity of cultures and artistic traditions that enliven our nation. Meet extraordinary artists from across the country who have been awarded the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, the nation’s highest honor for excellence in the folk and traditional arts. Together they represent a remarkable portrait of America’s diverse cultural heritage."
Seth Dixons insight:
This is an excellent StoryMap that to see examples of local and indigenous cultures that are being practiced by some in the United States. The NEA Fellowship also shows how preserving local and indigenous cultural traits in the face of popular cultural influences is difficult and is seen as a national priority and part of a treasured cultural heritage. Also, read this article on how to plan a good storymap.  Read with additional links here: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/11/05/masters-of-tradition-a-culture-journey-across-america/
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Geopolitics interfering with business, and business interfering with geopolitics –

Geopolitics interfering with business, and business interfering with geopolitics – | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“After Daryl Morey, the Houston Rockets’ general manager, tweeted in support of protestors in Hong Kong, he found himself at the center of an NBA-wide controversy concerning everyone from Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta to the Chinese government. The tweet has been deleted, but the debates on China’s role in the NBA continue.” 

This has been an interesting last few weeks for NBA commentators, as the most important topic of conversation in basketball circles has been (surprisingly) about the Hong Kong protests and China’s response to them. The origin of the story is lengthy, but some NBA employees tweeted support for the Hong Kong protesters and the Chinese government, the Chinese Basketball Association, and Chinese media platforms did not like it one bit.

China is a massive market that the NBA has been nurturing since Yao Ming’s playing days, and it is almost too tantalizing a market to ignore. The NBA is now discovering that there is a price to pay to do business in China, and we are watching this tension between a league with a history of politically outspoken players, coaches, and general managers. Many are backpedaling (like LeBron James and Stephen Curry) as China keeps flexing.

In a similar vein, the new DreamWorks movie Abominable has a scene that shows the 9-dash line of the South China Sea. Vietnam and Malaysia have both pulled the movie from theaters in their countries. This is just another recent example of soft power being used to promote a political perspective through business connections.

Ben Seaman's curator insight, October 23, 2019 6:30 PM
In the 2018 Nba Season, 300 million people watched a portion of an NBA game in China. Recently, protestors in Hong Kong have led demonstrations fighting for basic human rights that in America we are used to as the normal. Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey shared his support via twitter for the Hong Kong citizens fighting for human rights. Following the tweet, the Chinese Government cut all deals with the NBA, censored opening night games from being viewed in China, and also demanded that the Morey be fired immediately. 
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Remembering a Geography Education Legend

Remembering a Geography Education Legend | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Last year, I was considering ways to get some of the “ancestors” of AP Human Geography to the reading. Alec Murphy was the Professional Development Night speaker at the 2019 APHG reading. I was hoping to have James Marran address the APHG reading community but he has passed away. ETS has asked me to share this letter to remember him as a pioneer for the APHG community and geography education.
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Geography and the Coronavirus

Geography and the Coronavirus | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are far too many geographic issues that stem out of the Coronavirus pandemic to create anything close to comprehensive, but I wanted to share some of the articles that caught my eye recently because they touch on particularly geographic themes. So, this will not give a global overview, predictions, or breaking news, but some of the underlying issues and questions that we are now grappling with as so many are now in some form of self-isolation.
Seth Dixons insight:
Linked here are 10 resources that educators can use to link COVID-19 to geographic concepts.  It's all geography folks. 
ezra low's curator insight, May 7, 6:30 AM
Informative link to a blog that supports real world learning. This blog type entry provides several different catergories of data. Options include an interactive map as pictured, in which you can choose a certain country to investigate. Additional options allow you to look at a bell curve of cases, live cases or total cases. Very god exploratory map that could allow students to utilise a web-based tool that supports real world learning. The blog additionally has links to how the world has been effected by this pandamic, with some information on nature affects etc. Good for secondary educators, and can easily utilise some of this content for human geography - disease being endemic, epidemic and pandemic.
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Learning From Home

Learning From Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As all of us are hunkering down, universities and high schools are adopting some online teaching strategies. Many people are streaming entertainment content to pass the time with family or roommates as our lifeline to the outside world. While these might not be top on your streaming list of videos, podcasts, or online content, all of these are solid content that teach us plenty about the cultural landscape or about the world around us. This list will continue to be updated as I haven’t watched/listened to everything here as of yet (I’ll be glad to take your suggestions @ProfessorDixon)." https://wp.me/P2dv5Z-2T9

Bruno BK Kesangana's curator insight, March 22, 3:05 PM
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The Beauty of Terraced Fields

The Beauty of Terraced Fields | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"For thousands of years, when farmers in mountainous regions have expanded their farms to grow crops on the steep slopes, they have carved massive steps into the terrain, forming terraces of many small platforms. Following the contours of the mountains, the edges of the terraces create sinuous patterns in the landscape, presenting picturesque images. Gathered here are photos from China, Switzerland, Vietnam, Peru, the Philippines, and Japan."
Seth Dixons insight:
This gallery of 27 terraced rice fields is absolutely fabulous. I find these to be some of the more beautiful cultural landscapes; I’m drawn to the great extent of agricultural modifications of the environment, coupled with the rugged physical landscape. Read with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2St ;
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Which Countries are in the European Union in 2020, Which Aren't, and Which Want to Join?

Which Countries are in the European Union in 2020, Which Aren't, and Which Want to Join? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The UK has finally officially left the European Union (EU), almost four years after its famous "Brexit" vote, and taken the British territory of Gibraltar out with it. Here's our updated map and list of which countries are in the EU, which ones are trying to join, and which European countries are in neither group.
Seth Dixons insight:
Today I’m teaching the my first class on “the Geography of Europe” since the UK has officially withdrawn from the European Union. As I went looking for any updated map of the EU, I found this excellent article along with the map and thought it was worth sharing. Since Brexit has finally been formalized, these snarky tweets were fun (but only visible with the links here): https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Sf
Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, March 18, 2:38 PM
Use for UN unit and Revolutions
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Mapping the Coronavirus

Mapping the Coronavirus | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Empty description
Seth Dixons insight:
After several inaccurate maps spread misinformation (dare I say, in a viral fashion?), I felt it would be important to not only share some good maps, but the most data-rich maps as well. Here is a link to the Center of Disease Control’s (CDC) page about the Coronavirus.and a copy of their map (accurate as of Feb 24) in the image below.
My favorite source is a GIS dashboard from John Hopkins that is incredibly detailed. This is a great way to show how big data, mapping, and geography become very relevant. Check it out with the links here: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2RS
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Exploring Landscapes through Sport

"Way Back Home is the incredible new riding clip from Danny MacAskill, it follows him on a journey from Edinburgh back to his hometown Dunvegan, in the Isle of Skye."


Seth Dixons insight:
I love Danny Macaskill’s video that puts Scotland’s cultural and physical landscapes on display. This extreme sports clip is in many ways more about the places that are being shown that infused with gorgeous physical landscapes. The architecture, the historic sites, the everyday towns, and transportation infrastructure all speak to the importance of landscape in creating a place that is beloved by its people. GeoED Tags: landscape, sport, UK, video. Not surprisingly, I’m also a fan of this other video, The Ridge. The Ridge is far more about the physical landscapes of Scotland than the cultural landscapes, but both are stunning. See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2RB
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On the edge of America, census begins in a tiny Alaska town

On the edge of America, census begins in a tiny Alaska town | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"The first Americans to be counted in the 2020 census live in [Toksook Bay, Alaska], a tiny community of 661 on the edge of the American expanse. Their homes are huddled together in a windswept Bering Sea village, painted vivid lime green, purple or neon blue to help distinguish the signs of life from a frigid white winterscape that makes it hard to tell where the frozen sea ends and the village begins. Once the spring thaw hits, the town empties as many residents scatter for traditional hunting and fishing grounds, and the frozen ground that in January makes it easier to get around by March turns to marsh that’s difficult to traverse. The mail service is spotty and the internet connectivity unreliable, which makes door-to-door surveying important. For those reasons, they have to start early here."


Seth Dixons insight:
This article is a reminder that while we are on preparing for the constitutionally-mandated 2020 census (get ready for updated maps everyone!!), the census is tasked with counting everyone. Some populations such as this indigenous village in Alaska are harder to count than others.

Questions to Ponder: What are other populations that might be under-represented in the census? What would be measures that census employees could take to count those people? How does the census improve our ability to understand geographic patterns? See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Rn
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Why 40% of Vietnamese People Have the Same Last Name

Why 40% of Vietnamese People Have the Same Last Name | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the United States, the most popular last name is Smith. As per the 2010 census, about 0.8 percent of Americans have it. In Vietnam, the most popular last name is Nguyen. The estimate for how many people answer to it? Somewhere between 30 and 40 percent of the country’s population. The 14 most popular last names in Vietnam account for well over 90 percent of the population. The 14 most popular last names in the US? Fewer than 6 percent.
Seth Dixons insight:
So many things are cultural beyond language, religion, and ethnicity, but those are the biggies in book chapters and in the curriculum. Should you strike up a conversation with that stranger in the elevator? How far from home is it appropriate for children to go from the house unattended? What clothes are appropriate for a teacher to wear in the classroom? These are all questions about cultural norms, but we don’t think about them as cultural at times because we are so used to our own cultural context that it seems natural. The importance of last names and naming conventions aren’t natural but are created by cultural norms and institutions. See with links on: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2QP
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Different Dialects

See post with Geo Ed links here: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Qx
Seth Dixons insight:
This is a flippant, silly video (with some language that you might not want young kids hearing), but it shows that the speakers of the same language can still has some have some significant barriers to understanding each other. Dialects of a same language have different pronunciations but also distinct vocabulary that is often place-specific. Dialects and accents create variety in cultural geography that makes traveling around the world enticing and exhilarating because there is always something else to learn about this crazy Earth.
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Economies of South America

World Economic Outlook, April 2019 - http://bit.ly/2vAxtak
Seth Dixons insight:
There are many stories in this video in the nearly 40 years of economic history of South America since 1990.The two most important stories portrayed (or at least the most dramatic) in the animated chart are decline of Venezuela’s economy and the rise of Chile’s. This video can act as a primer to get students to consider the regional context of economic growth as well as the differing historical, political, and geographic context that leads to distinct results in any given country. See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Qa


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Around world, more support taking in refugees than immigrants

Around world, more support taking in refugees than immigrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On balance, people around the world are more accepting of refugees fleeing violence and war than they are of immigrants moving to their country, according to a new analysis of public opinion data from 18 nations surveyed by Pew Research Center in spring 2018.
Seth Dixons insight:
We know that there are diverse perspectives on migration in our own country, but it is important to remember that our country’s conversation is also a part of a global conversation. As many developed countries are trying to limit some of the permeability of their borders, and as economic migrants seek to improve their economic opportunities, the immigration debates become more central to Since there has been As the Pew Research data shows, in North America, the immigration discussion and the refugee discussion have converged, where in countries such as Greece they are very much different conversations.
Questions to Ponder:
Why might the immigration and refugee assistance questions elicit a greater distinction in European countries (such as Germany, Italy, and Greece) then it did in North American countries (such as the U.S. and Canada)?
What are some impacts of the convergence of the political conversations surrounding immigration and refugee assistance for the United States and its policies?

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