Galapagos
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Galapagos
Information about the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador and South America
Curated by Dot MacKenzie
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Tackling Plastic Pollution in the Galapagos | Stories | WWF

Tackling Plastic Pollution in the Galapagos | Stories | WWF | Galapagos | Scoop.it
Around the world, humans produce an estimated 1.3 billion tons of plastic waste per year, a number that is set to increase to 2.2 billion by 2025. In countries such as Ecuador that have limited garbage collection services, some of this plastic waste inevitably ends up back in the oceans or on beaches, where it has the potential to harm and human health.
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Training: Get involved

Training: Get involved | Galapagos | Scoop.it

Avian awareness and avoidance training
DOC, in partnership with Kiwis for kiwi, has developed an avian (bird) awareness and avoidance training programme for dogs and their owners.

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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | Galapagos | Scoop.it

Scientists model where and when the debris from the March 2011 Japanese tsunami will be.  The likelihood that the debris (not radioactive) will reach the U.S. west coast is increasingly likely.  Look at the great video attached to the article.   

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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:37 PM

An example of how even without considering globalization the world is interconnected. The debris from the 2011 tsunami was never disposed of effectively and the United States may be effected more than they ever expected. If this pile of debris reaches US shores it will make many Americans consider how a tsunami across the globe will eventually hurt them at home. 

Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 9:05 PM
The devastation of the Japanese tsunami has left debris moving slowly across the Pacific and approaching the US. The issue is that this stuff is just floating around and destroying our ecosystem and less people are doing something about it. We need to understand that we are solution and have to figure out a way to fix this. 
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The Secret to a Sound Ocean

The Secret to a Sound Ocean | Galapagos | Scoop.it
Acoustics mean different things to different species.

As humans, we need sound to hear our favorite music, the roar of the crowd and sirens so we don’t get flattened by a firetruck or freight train. While hearing is an enjoyable part of living a fulfilled life, we can get by without it.

Whales on the other hand, have a harder time. Whales are auditory creatures, meaning hearing is essential to their communication, navigation, feeding, and breeding.

Whales depend on sound in every aspect of their lives: from using echolocation to orient themselves in the dark waters, to emitting mating calls during breeding season, or just having a whale chat.

When container ships, oil tankers, and other large vessels travel through waters that are populated by whales, the ships produce noise that throws the whales into a state of disarray and messes with their activities and daily life. The sound is so strong, it would be as if you were at a party and someone blasted music so loud you couldn’t even hear each other speak — let alone try and mate. Sound is important to the whales, and creating a beautiful sounding ocean will help them in all their future endeavors...


Via Lauren Moss, Greenroom Dweller
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Choco-Andino: A New Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador

Choco-Andino: A New Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador | Galapagos | Scoop.it
This UNESCO recognized biodiversity hotspot is full of great vacation destinations for the naturalist with an adventurous spirit.
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Costa Rica Prepares to Export 10 tonnes of Hammerhead Shark Fins

Costa Rica Prepares to Export 10 tonnes of Hammerhead Shark Fins | Galapagos | Scoop.it
Ten tonnes of hammerhead shark fins, stored in Costa Rican warehouses and obtained during a ban on the export of shark fins, are awaiting export approval from t
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Exclusive Economic Zones

Exclusive Economic Zones | Galapagos | Scoop.it

Today, a country’s marine economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line (hi-res image). This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).

 

Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 

 

Tags:  economic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.  

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