Family Law and Divorce
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Learned from Divorce | Life Lessons | The Divorce Magazine

Learned from Divorce | Life Lessons | The Divorce Magazine | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
There's alot that Caroline learned from divorce. Here she shares her tips and divorce advice on how to cope with the effects of this experience.
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Family Law and Divorce
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7 Ways to Separate Yourselves from the High Cost of Divorce - DailyFinance

7 Ways to Separate Yourselves from the High Cost of Divorce - DailyFinance | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
7 Ways to Separate Yourselves from the High Cost of Divorce
DailyFinance
If you're thinking about divorce, it's too late for a prenup. But you and the soon-to-be-ex can go for a saner and financially sensible breakup that will be easier on you both.
Charles Morriss insight:

Divorce should be about the future, not the past. "What you're really doing is cementing or obtaining the resources you need to move on with the rest of your life under a new context,"

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Effective Ways to Find Yourself Again After a Hard Divorce

Effective Ways to Find Yourself Again After a Hard Divorce | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Find Yourself Again After a Hard Divorce-Divorce procedure takes away a lot of time, efforts and money.You pause your normal life to file for divorce...
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Children Of Divorce Are Affected By Conflicting Parental Lifestyles

Children Of Divorce Are Affected By Conflicting Parental Lifestyles | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Understanding the impact on children of divoce when both paents have conflicting values and lifestyle...
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8 Strategies for Helping Kids Adjust to a Divorce

8 Strategies for Helping Kids Adjust to a Divorce | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Children can emerge from a divorce in good shape if parents work hard to create a stable environment.
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Henry VIII's Divorce of Catherine of Aragon – Who had the Better Case in the Great Divorce? Part 3: Catherine’s Case for the Marriage —

Henry VIII's Divorce of Catherine of Aragon – Who had the Better Case in the Great Divorce? Part 3: Catherine’s Case for the Marriage — | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
King Henry VIII of England’s divorce, or annulment, of Catherine of Aragon in 1533 is one of the most infamous separations in history. And while we nearly all know the end result of the divorce proceedings, in hindsight who had the stronger case?
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Dating After Divorce: Questions to Never Ask

Dating After Divorce: Questions to Never Ask | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
When venturing into the world of dating following a divorce, it's important to focus on the present and those things you're looking for in a future relationship....
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Budgeting After a Divorce | Focused Finances, LLC

Budgeting After a Divorce | Focused Finances, LLC | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Divorce is the second most stressful time in a person's life. Here's some tips to get through it.
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How COVID-19 Can Impact the Outcome of Your Divorce

How COVID-19 Can Impact the Outcome of Your Divorce | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
A job loss and accumulation of debt due to COVID-19 could have a significant impact on the outcome of your divorce. Learn more here.
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Treating Relational Trauma in Children of Divorce and Separation –

Treating Relational Trauma in Children of Divorce and Separation – | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Relational trauma in divorce and separation is seen when children carry the consequences of their parents behaviours. Alienation in a child is caused by a process of events, behaviours in parents, the environment in which they occur and the child's own resilience or lack of it.
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Preparing for Divorce is More Than Just Finding the Best Online Divorce Website

Preparing for Divorce is More Than Just Finding the Best Online Divorce Website | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Most people get confused and stressed when they find their marriage on the rocks. And most of them see no other ways out than a divorce.
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‘A Waiting Game’: Coronavirus Shutdowns Cause Unprecedented Backlog In Divorce, Family Law Cases – CBS Los Angeles

‘A Waiting Game’: Coronavirus Shutdowns Cause Unprecedented Backlog In Divorce, Family Law Cases – CBS Los Angeles | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Another unexpected consequence of the coronavirus - couples across the state who have to wait to untie the knot.
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3 benefits when you hire a divorce lawyer

3 benefits when you hire a divorce lawyer | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Why hire a divorce lawyer? Find the top 3 benefits here. By carefully negotiating the best terms for everyone involved, a positive outcome is reachable.
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5 Reasons to Hire a Divorce Coach

5 Reasons to Hire a Divorce Coach | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
A divorce coach has skills in communication, mediation and counseling. They can help you attain a new perspective and think beyond the traditional definitions and stereotypes about divorce. Divorce coaching is not therapy or counseling, it is support and guidance for someone going through divorce...
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Preparing your finances for divorce in the current environment

Preparing your finances for divorce in the current environment | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
When you consider finances are a leading cause of stress in Australians it is not surprising to hear it is also one of the top reasons for separation and divorce. So, how can you prepare and manage your finances for divorce or separation and what extra steps should be taken into consideration...
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How to plan your finances after getting a divorce | John Hancock

How to plan your finances after getting a divorce | John Hancock | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Research shows that there were 16.7 divorces per 1,000 married women in 2016 — such circumstances are stressful and can be exacerbated when children are involved: Parents may experience difficult financial and legal issues through the process, even as they contemplate how to minimize the impact on their children.     Katelyn* found herself in that situation upon learning that her husband wanted a divorce. Her first thoughts were to ensure the future security of her then four-year-old daughter in every possible way. Katelyn's ex-husband planned to move to another country after the divorce, which meant for all practical purposes, she would be both mom and dad, full-time.   “I knew the financial and support responsibilities of being a single parent would be enormous,” says Katelyn, a CPA and MBA expert in technical accounting and regulatory policy.    In most respects Katelyn's skilled financial background and the aid of experts like a divorce financial professional helped her safeguard her child and the assets that mattered to their futures. Though she annually funds her 401K to the full extent, she expects to work past retirement age – approaching in about five years – to maintain her lifestyle and support her daughter’s college endeavors. If you, too, unexpectedly become a single parent, there are a few steps you can take to help prepare yourself and your family for the transition:   Reviewing college fund plans Katelyn and her ex regularly contributed to a 529 plan once their child was born, including a final payment each made as part of concluding the divorce. “Not much has gone into it since,” she says; future payments weren’t included in the divorce agreement. Even if they were, current circumstances likely would prevent additional contributions on her ex's part as he is now unemployed and even monthly child support payments are sporadic.  At this point, she knows she’ll probably pay more towards her daughter’s education than her ex. “The cost of college is very high, and depending on your salary as a professional, your child’s financial aid opportunities may be less,” she says. Sheri Conklin, principal of Conklin Financial Planning, says that depending on a couple's income and the expenses of going from one to two households, more often than not a divorce will mark the end of college fund contributions – at least for a short while and probably longer for all but the most high-income earners. Even if contributions are stipulated in a divorce agreement, “when funds get tight usually that’s something people can’t afford to do,” she says. She recommends preparing children for other ways to support their education, such as scholarships and jobs. Alternately, “if you can fund a Roth IRA and meet your retirement projections, you can always pull some money from there to help with college” without incurring penalties, Conklin says.    Managing disability insurance  Katelyn is fortunate that her current employer in Manhattan provides very good disability insurance. But others who have existing policies and have recently become single parents may want to look into a “Future Purchase Option” rider, recommends Jason P. Veirs, owner and president of Insurance Experts. This “allows an insured to increase their coverage while not having to medically re-qualify again,” he says. “This is important as a person’s income tends to increase throughout their career, and they can continue to increase their coverage as their liabilities increase.”  Disability insurance can have pitfalls for the self-employed and individuals who work for small companies. They won’t get the benefit of the group rates that large companies can negotiate. But if “you can’t afford to get a policy that covers up to 60% of your salary [the industry standard], maybe look at covering a portion of it,” Conklin advises. Altering guardianship arrangements  One of Katelyn’s most important divorce agreement requirements was that her daughter remain in the states while a minor. Since it’s not likely that her ex wants to return to live here, Katelyn named her sister, a lawyer in New York, to assume the role of guardian should circumstances warrant. Updating legal documents to cover this issue is particularly critical if a parent has reason to want to avoid or mitigate the other parent’s say in who becomes the legal guardian upon his or her death. “He or she should create a comprehensive estate plan, including a will, guardian nominations, and even exclusions (a list of folks who should not be named guardian),” says Anthony S. Park of Anthony S. Park, PLLC, a NY law firm of probate attorneys and professional executors.     Aligning life insurance To protect their child, Katelyn’s divorce agreement specified that each party take out 20-year, $200,000 term insurance policies. Katelyn has further secured her daughter’s future by taking advantage of additional life insurance through her employer. While divorced partners can serve as each other’s trustee or guardian for a life insurance policy in which the child is the beneficiary, that’s not always the best approach. Katelyn is custodian for her daughter as the beneficiary of her ex’s policy; but Katelyn’s sister serves that function for her policy, where her daughter is also the beneficiary. Conklin says it’s in the best interest of the child to “name someone you know will make sure that the money gets to the kids or goes to help the kids. You want someone who will put their interests first,” she says.   Maintaining good health Your health and fitness can fall by the wayside when you lose a partner to lean on. Katelyn initially tried to take art, dance and workout classes. But “working in NYC, with age advancing, has been draining my energy,” she says. It can be difficult to find the time, money and energy to stay in good health as a single parent, but it’s important to make self care part of your parenting strategy. One way to minimize time and cost is to exercise with your child so that it becomes healthy quality time as a family.   For Katelyn, and many single parents, it’s all about persistence. “I know I need to get a healthier lifestyle, and I plan to get back into things.” She wants to provide as much support for her daughter for as long as she can.   “I have every intention of being there for her,” says Katelyn.
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Divorce

Divorce | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
It’s crucial that we find people in our lives who are experienced in listening to and talking with God to guide us into recognizing His voice in our lives.
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The Faults in Our Stars: Divorce in the Time of Corona

The Faults in Our Stars: Divorce in the Time of Corona | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
I wondered when had "always" changed to "not anymore".
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Divorce rates have tripled among boomers 55 and older, study shows

Divorce rates have tripled among boomers 55 and older, study shows | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Soul searching empty nesters suffering through subpar marriages find that divorce after 60 can be an improvement, especially if they realize they can’t stand the person they’re married to.
“People are living longer.
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Helpful Tips To Rebuild Your Life After A Divorce

Helpful Tips To Rebuild Your Life After A Divorce | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Building a new life after divorce can be a frightening and unnerving process. Where will I go? Who will I spend my time with?What...
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9 Tips for Dating After a Divorce and With Children | Natural Kimberly Elise Natural Living

9 Tips for Dating After a Divorce and With Children | Natural Kimberly Elise Natural Living | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Here are tips to keep in mind while navigating the dating world after a divorce with children.
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Thinking About Filing for Divorce? Here Are 5 Things You Must Consider

Thinking About Filing for Divorce? Here Are 5 Things You Must Consider | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Unfortunately, the number of divorces that happen every year both in this country and internationally are ever-increasing. A statistic that’s been rapidly rising throughout the years, it’s a hard decision that millions make.
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Seven common divorce myths

Seven common divorce myths | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Before you and your spouse officially separate, here are common divorce myths you’ll want to consciously avoid.
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Here's What To Do When You Get Pregnant Mid-Divorce

Here's What To Do When You Get Pregnant Mid-Divorce | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
What happens if you find out you're pregnant mid-divorce? Having conversations with your ex & planning finances are great places to start. Learn more here.
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Pandemic’s silver lining: Updating your paperwork as a divorce looms –

Pandemic’s silver lining: Updating your paperwork as a divorce looms – | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
Wills, trusts, powers of attorney and health care directives are dynamic. They should change as often as your life does.One of the most important times one should review and revise (or implement) …...
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Divorce – USLegal, Inc.

Divorce – USLegal, Inc. | Family Law and Divorce | Scoop.it
DIVORCE Divorce is a legal proceeding governed by state law that terminates a marriage relationship. Divorce is referred to in some states as dissolution of marriage. Once a divorce is final, parties to a divorce are free to remarry. Grounds for divorce vary by state statutes, with some states allowing divorce based on fault and no-fault grounds.  Examples of fault grounds for divorce include physical or mental cruelty, adultery, attempted murder, desertion, habitual drunkenness, addictive drug use, insanity, impotency, infection of one spouse by another of a venereal disease and imprisonment for a specific amount of time. Start your Divorce Online Now! – Uncontested Divorce Only.  All States.  Prepare all the documents you need online Divorce Highlights Parties who wish to obtain a divorce without assigning blame or guilt may seek a no-fault divorce. Some states require a period of separation prior to obtaining a no-fault divorce or require that irreconcilable differences or incompatibility exists between the parties for a particular period of time resulting in the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage. Parties may obtain a divorce without the counsel of an attorney, but may need to seek legal advice for complicated cases. Divorce actions can be uncontested or contested depending on whether the individuals agree on the terms and conditions of the divorce, such as property division, maintenance or spousal support, and child custody, visitation and support issues. Residency requirements for filing for divorce in a particular state vary by state statutes, but usually require that at least one party to the divorce be a resident of or establish domicile for a particular period of time in the state where they wish to file for divorce. Some states allow a simplified divorce process called a summary divorce or dissolution to parties who meet certain requirements, such as having a marriage of short duration, having no children, having minimal marital and separate property, and having waived the right to spousal support. Some states only require that the parties prove in writing that they have agreed to all significant issues, such as property division, support and issues relating to the children of the marriage. The procedure for obtaining a divorce begins with one party filing a petition or complaint of divorce with the family court or civil division of the county or district branch of the state superior or circuit court. The party filing the petition is usually referred to as the plaintiff or petitioner. The petition or complaint sets forth the parties’ names and addresses, the location and date of the parties’ marriage, the names and ages of the parties’ children, the grounds for divorce and the parties’ desires regarding property, support and issues relating to children. The petition or complaint may also include requests for temporary orders relating to financial obligations, occupation of the marital residence, alimony, custody, visitation, and child support. The petition or complaint must be legally delivered to or served on the other party according to state requirements to provide notice of the divorce, along with a summons requiring a response or answer to the petition or complaint. The person served with the petition or complaint and the summons is usually referred to as the defendant or respondent. He or she must answer within a specific amount of time acknowledging receipt of the petition or complaint and either agreeing with the petition or complaint or setting forth his or her disagreements. Failing to answer the petition or complaint is the equivalent of agreeing to its terms and a default will be entered against the defendant respondent. The parties to a divorce must share financial information with one another, including documents detailing each party’s assets, liabilities and income in order to properly divide property and establish amounts of support. Couples often reach a settlement regarding such issues by negotiating privately or entering mediation. If the parties reach a settlement, they can present it to the judge who will determine the parties’ intent and understanding of the agreement. The judge will issue a divorce decree if he or she approves the settlement agreement setting forth the parties’ agreement to various terms of the divorce. When a court is determining the divorce terms, it may take into consideration fault of the parties and any prenuptial or postnuptial agreements. If the parties cannot reach a settlement agreement or if the judge does not approve the parties’ agreement, the parties go to a trial to determine the contested issues of their divorce. Typically, only a judge will hear a divorce trial, but the parties may have the right to seek a jury trial. Based on state law and evidence presented at trial, the judge will decide the outstanding issues and grant a divorce judgment. If the parties do not agree with a judge’s decision regarding their divorce, they may file a motion to modify the divorce judgment or appeal to a higher court. A divorce decree provides for distribution of property and debts, spousal support payments, as well as custody, support and visitation of children of the marriage. When a party cannot agree on the process of dividing their property and debts, the court will distribute the property according to either state community property or equitable distribution laws. In several states, property owned equally by both parties is considered community property and is divided equally between parties to a divorce. In these states, each party retains his or her own separate property. In most states, however, the court distributes property and debts equitably or fairly according to equitable distribution principles. Marital or community property usually includes all the income and property acquired during the marriage. Non-marital or separate property includes property obtained prior to the marriage, gifts, inheritances or awards made to and kept separate by an individual party during the marriage and property purchased with a party’s separate funds. The court may award alimony or spousal support to one of the parties to a divorce who has fewer financial resources. The support award can be based on many factors, including the fault of the parties, the higher-earning party’s ability to pay, the lower-earning party’s age, physical, emotional and financial condition, earning capacity, educational level and vocational skills, length of time needed to become self-supporting, custodial responsibilities, standard of living, financial and non-financial contribution to the marriage, and the duration of the marriage. Spousal support may be considered temporary or rehabilitative and enforced only for the amount of time it takes the lower-earning spouse to become self-sufficient or permanent, if a party will likely not ever have the ability to support himself or herself. Most states allow either type of spousal support to end upon a change in circumstances, including the remarriage of the lower-earning spouse. If parties to a divorce who have children of the marriage cannot agree on custody and visitation rights, the court will decide these issues based on the best interests of the children. Typically, one parent will receive physical custody of the children, allowing them to reside with that parent most of the time, and both parents will share legal custody of the children. Parents with legal custody can make important decisions, such as those relating to the children’s education, religion and medical care. Joint custody results in the children spending an equal amount of time with each parent, while split custody allows one parent to receive custody of one or more children and the other parent custody of the remaining children. In determining the best interests of the children in an award of custody, the court will consider several factors, including the children’s preference (if the children are of a certain age), age and sex of the child, children’s development and progress in school and other activities, which parent serves as the children’s primary caretaker, the parents’ mental and physical health, religious beliefs, stability of home environment, relationship with other members in parents’ home, support the parent will provide the child in interacting with the other parent or the children’s family, abuse by a parent and the lifestyle of a parent, including drug or alcohol use. In certain situations, persons other than parents may obtain custody of children, such as grandparents or other close family members. Some states consider such persons guardians of the child. The court will also award a non-custodial parent visitation rights, either through a reasonable visitation schedule left to the parties to establish or a fixed visitation schedule. Parents who have a history of physical abuse or violence may only receive rights to supervised visitation, requiring another adult to be present during the visits with the children. Grandparents of children of divorced parents may also seek visitation rights when the parents of the children divorce or when one or both parents die. Some states have enacted restrictive visitation statutes for grandparents only, while others allow visitation by persons other than grandparents, including foster parents or stepparents, even when the parents have not divorced or died. Finally, a court will set forth the required amount of income to be paid by the non-custodial parent for the support of the children. Federal law requires all states to implement guidelines for determining child support. The guidelines consider the income of the parties, the number of children and the needs of the children. Although the formulas set forth in the guidelines are used to calculate a specific amount of support, parties can request that the amount be modified due to certain circumstances, such as the parents having joint physical custody of the children. Likewise, parties can seek modification of child support orders based on a change in circumstances, such as an increase or decrease in income, child’s needs or cost of living. When a party fails to pay child support, a child support withholding order or wage deduction can require that the amount of child support be automatically deducted from the party’s paycheck. A party may face state and federal penalties for failure to meet child support obligations, such as having his or her tax refunds collected, property seized, being imprisoned or fined for being held in contempt of court or having his or her driver’s license or other professional license revoked. Divorce Forms Locate many different types of Divorce forms and packages at US LegalForms, including Uncontested No-Fault Agreed Divorce Forms for Persons with No Children, Uncontested No-Fault Agreed Divorce Forms for Persons with Adult Children, Uncontested No-Fault Agreed Divorce Forms for Persons with Minor Children or Minor and Adult Children, Separation Agreements, Divorce Worksheets, and much more. Information and Resources Divorce Definitions, for divorce-related terms, as well as Law Digests for general divorce information, child custody, child support, grandparents’ visitation, and separation agreements and Q&A Services for various divorce categories are all available at US Legal. USLF also offers Document Completion/Preparation Services for many of its divorce products for those persons who need assistance in preparing their divorce forms. Find Divorce Attorney Use the US Legal Lawyer Directory to locate a Divorce attorney in your area if you need expert legal advice and/or services.
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Thoughts of Divorce Intruding on Your Everyday Life?

Are you questioning your marriage right now? Asking yourself questions like: Do I feel close and connected to my spouse? Are we more like roommates than lovers? Would I be better off on my own?If…...
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