Exposition Art Blog
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Exposition Art Blog: Amilcar Augusto de Castro - Brazilian Art

Exposition Art Blog: Amilcar Augusto de Castro - Brazilian Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Amílcar Augusto Pereira de Castro (6 June 1920 – 21 November 2002) was a Brazilian artist, sculptor and graphic designer. Starting his career as a graphic designer, de Castro revolutionized the design of Brazilian newspapers in the 1950s, notably Jornal do Brasil. From the 1960s he focused on sculpture and – alongside Lygia Clark, Ligia Pape and Helio Oiticica – was one of the leading figures of the Brazilian neo-constructivist movement.De Castro is particularly famous for large, bold simple iron forms nearly always characterized by a design based on "one cut, one fold."His method can be linked both to his earlier work with graphic design and paper, and to the mining heritage of his home state of Minas Gerais.De Castro did not just produce steel sculptures, he also used wood, marble and glass.


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Exposition Art Blog: Henriette Fauteux-Masse

Exposition Art Blog: Henriette Fauteux-Masse | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Henriette Fauteux-Masse (October 30, 1924 – March 5, 2005) was a Canadian painter living in Quebec.She was born in Coaticook and was first interested in dance. She later began painting, being largely self-taught. She visited New York City three times between 1946 and 1948, talking to artists and visiting museums. In 1951, she received a scholarship from the Quebec government which allowed her to study in Paris with André Lhote. She was known for her abstracts, landscapes and portraits. She participated in a number of shows in Quebec and in Paris.
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Exposition Art Blog: Paul-Emile Borduas - Abstract Paintings

Exposition Art Blog: Paul-Emile Borduas - Abstract Paintings | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Paul-Emile Borduas (November 1, 1905 – February 22, 1960) was a Québec painter known for his abstract paintings. He was the leader of the avant-garde Automatiste movement and the chief author of the Refus Global manifesto of 1948. Borduas had a profound impact on the development of the arts and of thought, both in the province of Quebec and in Canada. Paul-Émile Borduas is one of the most important figures in modern Canadian art. A leader of the group known as the Automatists, he developed a spontaneous style of non-figurative painting. Borduas was the principal author of the Refus Global, an influential manifesto calling for freedom of expression, and signed by many of Quebec's leading artists and intellectuals.


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Exposition Art Blog: Purvis Young - Outsider from Overtown - Avant Garde Art

Exposition Art Blog: Purvis Young - Outsider from Overtown - Avant Garde Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Purvis Young (February 4, 1943 – April 20, 2010) was an American artist from the Overtown neighborhood of Miami, Florida. Self-taught, Young's work was often a blend painting/drawing with collaged elements utilizing everyday discarded found objects. Inspired by documentaries, (art)books, American history and spiritual folklore his visual vocabuluary was vast; wild horses, urban landscapes, (self) portraits, figures, holymen, angels, warriors, boats, sports, musicians, erotica, processions and incarceration to name but a few


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Exposition Art Blog: Art & Fashion - Karl Lagerfeld - Egyptian-themed collection

Exposition Art Blog: Art & Fashion - Karl Lagerfeld - Egyptian-themed collection | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
“An ancient Egyptian temple at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art provided the setting for Chanel’s latest catwalk show, when the French fashion house debuted a collection featuring glittering tweeds, golden garments and bold jewels. The catwalk looped The Met’s Temple of Dendur – an Ancient Egyptian monument completed in 10BC – to create an appropriate setting for the debut of Chanel’s 2018/19 Métiers d'art collection earlier this week. With a taste for elaborate shows, creative director Karl Lagerfeld chose the decorative sandstone temple to provide the backdrop for the presentation, as well as inform the Egyptian-style aesthetic of the pieces. "Egyptian civilisation has always fascinated me: I get inspired by an idea, which I make a reality..”


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Exposition Art Blog: Michael Goldberg - Action Paintings & Abstract Expressionism

Exposition Art Blog: Michael Goldberg - Action Paintings & Abstract Expressionism | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Michael Goldberg (December 24, 1924 – December 31, 2007) was an American abstract expressionist painter and teacher known for his gestural action paintings, abstractions and still-life paintings... A veteran of World War II, Goldberg was one of the last few remaining survivors of the New York School;he was sometimes referred to as a member of the so-called "second generation" of Abstract Expressionists, although he began exhibiting his action paintings in important group shows in galleries in New York City in the early 1950s. Goldberg began taking classes at the Art Students League of New York at age 14. In the 1950s he studied painting with Hans Hofmann, and he discussed painting with Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Mark Rothko and several others of the New York School sometimes at The Eighth Street Club, a regular meeting place of modern artists working in and around Tenth Street in New York and sometimes at the Cedar Bar.


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Exposition Art Blog: Oldrich Kulhanek - Graphics

Exposition Art Blog: Oldrich Kulhanek - Graphics | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Oldrich Kulhanek (26 February 1940 – 28 January 2013) was a Czech painter, graphic designer, illustrator, stage designer and pedagogue. Kulhánek created the design for the current Czech banknotes and postage stamps.Kulhánek was born in Prague. Beginning in 1958, he studied at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague, in the atelier of Karel Svolinský. He graduated in 1964, with the cycles of illustrations to the poetry of Vladimír Holan and Christian Morgenstern (The Gallows Songs).In 1971 he was arrested by the StB (the Czechoslovak Secret Police) and imprisoned for "defamation of the allied socialist states". In a graphic cycle created from 1968 to 1971, he included "a distorted portrait of Joseph Stalin, perforated five-pointed red stars or joyful faces of socialist workers turned into a hideous grin". The graphics were identified as "ideologically dangerous" and condemned to destruction. Kulhánek spent a month in prison and was interrogated regularly for next two years. He was prohibited from publishing.In the 1980s, he created lithographs inspired by the development of the human body. Following the Velvet Revolution, he visited the USA and attended the Lithographic Workshop in Los Angeles. He also often travelled to Belgium, to study the works of old masters."


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Exposition Art Blog: Robert Juniper - Australian Landscapes

Exposition Art Blog: Robert Juniper - Australian Landscapes | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Robert Litchfield Juniper, AM (7 January 1929 – 20 December 2012) was an Australian artist, art teacher, illustrator, painter, printmaker and sculptor.Robert Juniper has been a significant figure in contemporary Australian painting since the 1960's and is recognised as a 'Living Treasure' in his home state of Western Australia . He has exhibited in London (Whitechapel, Tate galleries), and has twice been awarded the prestigious Wynne Prize for landscape painting. In 1984 he received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Western Australia , for his contribution to contemporary Australian art. In November 2005 a park in Perth was named after him by the Minister for Culture and Arts called Juniper Gardens , which showcases his magnificent bronze sculptures. Robert's work has shaped the way Australian's have imagined their country. He is best known and highly respected for his poetic and visionary approach to landscape, particularly the outback and desert.. His landscapes are a psychological and pictorial interpretation of space, blending his feelings about the landscape with what is visible to the eye. Although identifiable objects appear within his landscapes, the images are often metaphorical and the landscape represented stretches far further than the eye can see."


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Exposition Art Blog: John Davis - Australian Contemporary Sculpture

Exposition Art Blog: John Davis - Australian Contemporary Sculpture | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
John Davis (16 September 1936 – 17 October 1999) was an Australian sculptor and pioneer of Environmental art. An Australian exponent of Arte povera, he famously developed a new mode of Site-specific art at the Mildura Sculpture Triennial in the early 1970s. His most influential work, which was entitled Tree Piece, was made by encasing the trunks of several growing trees on the banks of the Murray River with, alternately, papier mache, mud, latex, coiled string, plastic cling wrap, and twigs bound together. The impermanent work was then allowed to weather and rot away. It was a breakthrough which lead many sculptors to reconsider the fate of outdoor works, and whether the fabrication of art might in some way adversely impact on the environment.Taking his cues from Aboriginal artifacts, Davis later became chiefly known for tender assembled works made of natural materials, including leaves and twigs, intended to highlight the fragile beauty of nature.


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Exposition Art Blog: Gustav Metzger - Auto-Destructive Art

Exposition Art Blog: Gustav Metzger - Auto-Destructive Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Gustav Metzger (10 April 1926, Nuremberg – 1 March 2017, London) was an artist and political activist who developed the concept of Auto-Destructive Art and the Art Strike. Together with John Sharkey, he initiated the Destruction in Art Symposium in 1966. Metzger was recognised for his protests in the political and artistic realms.His experience of twentieth century society’s destructive capabilities led Metzger to a concentrated ‘formulation of what destruction is and what it might be in relation to art.’ He was known as a leading exponent of the Auto-Destructive Art and the Art Strike movements. He was also active in the Committee of 100 - a ‘named’ memberIn 1959, Metzger published the first auto-destructive manifesto Auto-Destructive Art. This was given as a lecture to the Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) in 1964, which was taken over by students as an artistic 'Happening’. The Architectural Association published, in 2015, a facsimile edition of Metzger’s lecture transcript. In 1962 he participated in the Festival of Misfits organised by members of the Fluxus group, at Gallery One, London.Guitarist Pete Townshend from The Who studied with Metzger, and during the 1960s, Metzger’s work was projected on screens at The Who concerts.In 2005, he selected EASTinternational which he proclaimed to be “The art exhibition without the art.“Throughout the 60 years that Metzger produced politically engaged works, he incorporated materials ranging from trash to old newspapers, liquid crystals to industrial materials, and even acid.”


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Exposition Art Blog: Isaac Witkin - New Generation of sculptors

Exposition Art Blog: Isaac Witkin - New Generation of sculptors | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Isaac Witkin (American, 1936–2006), Succoth, 1975. Steel. Gift of Jacques and Donatella Lennon, 91.2.1 | Isaac Witkin rejected the idea that the human figure is necessary to sculpture, and instead explored abstraction in his work. The sculpture consists of welded steel plates painted bright orange. Each plate has an irregular geometric shape, some straight and rigid and others elegantly curved. The sheets slice into one another, delicately balancing on precise contact points. Their sharp edges pierce the space around them, as if Witkin is not only carving the sculpture but also carving air. The overlapped and stacked forms allow for a constantly changing play of light and shadow, assuming different configurations based on the viewing angle. Witkin had a consistent interest in how the scale of a sculpture can be determined by its relationship to the human body. He once stated that “I aim to establish a freedom to move in multiaxial space in a way that draws the spectator in and around the sculpture to experience different aspects of an evolving dynamic.”


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Exposition Art Blog: Sigmar Polke - Pop Art

Exposition Art Blog: Sigmar Polke - Pop Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Multi-media artist, Sigmar Polke, had the capacity to be at once irreverent, playful, and acerbic. From painting to photography and film to installations and prints, Polke's work, which often incorporated non-traditional materials and techniques, was above all a critique of art itself. Sometimes veiled and sometimes confrontational, the messages conveyed in his work raise serious questions about aesthetic, political, and social conventions. For Polke, the production of art was consistently a dialogue between himself and the viewer, which presented virtually limitless interpretive possibilities. Along with a group of fellow artists that included Gerhard Richter, he introduced the term, Capitalist Realism, which refers loosely to commodity-based art. Further, and specifically in the case of Polke's work, Capitalist Realism constitutes not only a critique of Pop art and the commodification of art and capitalism overall but also of the idealistic and overtly nationalistic Soviet Social Realism that Polke was particularly exposed (and opposed) to.The cynically witty Polke helped launch the Capitalist Realism style as a response to American and British Pop art. Rather than simply commenting on mass production and conspicuous consumption Polke went a step further.


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Exposition Art Blog: Kikuo Saito - Lyrical Abstraction

Exposition Art Blog: Kikuo Saito - Lyrical Abstraction | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Kikuo Saito (1939–2016) was a Japanese American abstract painter with ties to the Color Field tradition. Born in Tokyo, he came to New York City in 1966, where he worked as an assistant for such eminent painters as Helen Frankenthaler, Kenneth Noland, and Larry Poons. Saito's work infuses richly saturated colorscapes with delicately drawn lines. Saito was the creator of sui generis theatre and dance events, working under Ellen Stewart at La MaMa Experimental Theatre Company and collaborating with innovative and influential directors and choreographers Robert Wilson, Peter Brook, Jerome Robbins and Eva Maier.Saito's paintings have been featured in numerous solo and group shows worldwide, and are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Aldrich Contemporary Museums, and numerous private and corporate collections. KinoSaito, a non-profit museum and art space in Verplanck, New York, will open in 2020, in honor of Saito's interdisciplinary practice and spirit."


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Exposition Art Blog: Amilcar Augusto de Castro - Brazilian Art

Exposition Art Blog: Amilcar Augusto de Castro - Brazilian Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Amílcar Augusto Pereira de Castro (6 June 1920 – 21 November 2002) was a Brazilian artist, sculptor and graphic designer. Starting his career as a graphic designer, de Castro revolutionized the design of Brazilian newspapers in the 1950s, notably Jornal do Brasil. From the 1960s he focused on sculpture and – alongside Lygia Clark, Ligia Pape and Helio Oiticica – was one of the leading figures of the Brazilian neo-constructivist movement.De Castro is particularly famous for large, bold simple iron forms nearly always characterized by a design based on "one cut, one fold."His method can be linked both to his earlier work with graphic design and paper, and to the mining heritage of his home state of Minas Gerais.De Castro did not just produce steel sculptures, he also used wood, marble and glass.."


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Exposition Art Blog: Henriette Fauteux-Masse

Exposition Art Blog: Henriette Fauteux-Masse | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Henriette Fauteux-Masse (October 30, 1924 – March 5, 2005) was a Canadian painter living in Quebec.She was born in Coaticook and was first interested in dance. She later began painting, being largely self-taught. She visited New York City three times between 1946 and 1948, talking to artists and visiting museums. In 1951, she received a scholarship from the Quebec government which allowed her to study in Paris with André Lhote. She was known for her abstracts, landscapes and portraits. She participated in a number of shows in Quebec and in Paris


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Exposition Art Blog: Purvis Young - Outsider from Overtown - Avant Garde Art

Exposition Art Blog: Purvis Young - Outsider from Overtown - Avant Garde Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Purvis Young (February 4, 1943 – April 20, 2010) was an American artist from the Overtown neighborhood of Miami, Florida. Self-taught, Young's work was often a blend painting/drawing with collaged elements utilizing everyday discarded found objects. Inspired by documentaries, (art)books, American history and spiritual folklore his visual vocabuluary was vast; wild horses, urban landscapes, (self) portraits, figures, holymen, angels, warriors, boats, sports, musicians, erotica, processions and incarceration to name but a few..


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Exposition Art Blog: Art & Fashion - Karl Lagerfeld - Egyptian-themed collection

Exposition Art Blog: Art & Fashion - Karl Lagerfeld - Egyptian-themed collection | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
“An ancient Egyptian temple at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art provided the setting for Chanel’s latest catwalk show, when the French fashion house debuted a collection featuring glittering tweeds, golden garments and bold jewels. The catwalk looped The Met’s Temple of Dendur – an Ancient Egyptian monument completed in 10BC – to create an appropriate setting for the debut of Chanel’s 2018/19 Métiers d'art collection earlier this week. With a taste for elaborate shows, creative director Karl Lagerfeld chose the decorative sandstone temple to provide the backdrop for the presentation, as well as inform the Egyptian-style aesthetic of the pieces. "Egyptian civilisation has always fascinated me: I get inspired by an idea, which I make a reality..”


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Exposition Art Blog: Michael Goldberg - Action Paintings & Abstract Expressionism

Exposition Art Blog: Michael Goldberg - Action Paintings & Abstract Expressionism | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Michael Goldberg (December 24, 1924 – December 31, 2007) was an American abstract expressionist painter and teacher known for his gestural action paintings, abstractions and still-life paintings... A veteran of World War II, Goldberg was one of the last few remaining survivors of the New York School;he was sometimes referred to as a member of the so-called "second generation" of Abstract Expressionists, although he began exhibiting his action paintings in important group shows in galleries in New York City in the early 1950s. Goldberg began taking classes at the Art Students League of New York at age 14. In the 1950s he studied painting with Hans Hofmann, and he discussed painting with Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Mark Rothko and several others of the New York School sometimes at The Eighth Street Club, a regular meeting place of modern artists working in and around Tenth Street in New York and sometimes at the Cedar Bar.


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Exposition Art Blog: Oldrich Kulhanek - Graphics

Exposition Art Blog: Oldrich Kulhanek - Graphics | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Oldrich Kulhanek (26 February 1940 – 28 January 2013) was a Czech painter, graphic designer, illustrator, stage designer and pedagogue. Kulhánek created the design for the current Czech banknotes and postage stamps.Kulhánek was born in Prague. Beginning in 1958, he studied at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague, in the atelier of Karel Svolinský. He graduated in 1964, with the cycles of illustrations to the poetry of Vladimír Holan and Christian Morgenstern (The Gallows Songs).In 1971 he was arrested by the StB (the Czechoslovak Secret Police) and imprisoned for "defamation of the allied socialist states". In a graphic cycle created from 1968 to 1971, he included "a distorted portrait of Joseph Stalin, perforated five-pointed red stars or joyful faces of socialist workers turned into a hideous grin". The graphics were identified as "ideologically dangerous" and condemned to destruction. Kulhánek spent a month in prison and was interrogated regularly for next two years. He was prohibited from publishing.In the 1980s, he created lithographs inspired by the development of the human body. Following the Velvet Revolution, he visited the USA and attended the Lithographic Workshop in Los Angeles. He also often travelled to Belgium, to study the works of old masters."


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Exposition Art Blog: Robert Juniper - Australian Landscapes

Exposition Art Blog: Robert Juniper - Australian Landscapes | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Robert Litchfield Juniper, AM (7 January 1929 – 20 December 2012) was an Australian artist, art teacher, illustrator, painter, printmaker and sculptor.Robert Juniper has been a significant figure in contemporary Australian painting since the 1960's and is recognised as a 'Living Treasure' in his home state of Western Australia . He has exhibited in London (Whitechapel, Tate galleries), and has twice been awarded the prestigious Wynne Prize for landscape painting. In 1984 he received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Western Australia , for his contribution to contemporary Australian art. In November 2005 a park in Perth was named after him by the Minister for Culture and Arts called Juniper Gardens , which showcases his magnificent bronze sculptures. Robert's work has shaped the way Australian's have imagined their country. He is best known and highly respected for his poetic and visionary approach to landscape, particularly the outback and desert.. His landscapes are a psychological and pictorial interpretation of space, blending his feelings about the landscape with what is visible to the eye. Although identifiable objects appear within his landscapes, the images are often metaphorical and the landscape represented stretches far further than the eye can see."


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Exposition Art Blog: John Davis - Australian Contemporary Sculpture

Exposition Art Blog: John Davis - Australian Contemporary Sculpture | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
John Davis (16 September 1936 – 17 October 1999) was an Australian sculptor and pioneer of Environmental art. An Australian exponent of Arte povera, he famously developed a new mode of Site-specific art at the Mildura Sculpture Triennial in the early 1970s. His most influential work, which was entitled Tree Piece, was made by encasing the trunks of several growing trees on the banks of the Murray River with, alternately, papier mache, mud, latex, coiled string, plastic cling wrap, and twigs bound together. The impermanent work was then allowed to weather and rot away. It was a breakthrough which lead many sculptors to reconsider the fate of outdoor works, and whether the fabrication of art might in some way adversely impact on the environment.Taking his cues from Aboriginal artifacts, Davis later became chiefly known for tender assembled works made of natural materials, including leaves and twigs, intended to highlight the fragile beauty of nature


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Exposition Art Blog: Teresa Rudowicz - Collage Art

Exposition Art Blog: Teresa Rudowicz - Collage Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Teresa Rudowicz born in 1928 in Torun, he died in 1994 in Krakow. She was one of the most distinct personalities in the Krakow artistic community. Teresa Rudowicz studied in the years 1948-50 at the State School of Fine Arts in Gdańsk, later the Academy of Fine Arts (Painting Faculty), obtaining the diploma in 1954 at the studio of Czesław Rzepiński. She was a co-founder of the Cracow Group Artistic Association (November 1956). She took part in the majority of the Cracow’s Group exhibitions in Poland and abroad. In the 50’s of the 20th century she painted and created lithographical compositions according to the spirit of informel abstraction. Since the beginning of the 60s she started creating her most characteristic collages, which are sometimes compared to the similar artistic streams like matter or assemblages. The artist was known by adding authentic objects to her works (often being accused of “spoiling” old prints). When martial law was declared in Poland in the 80’s, she created some religious theme compositions


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Exposition Art Blog: Gustav Metzger - Auto-Destructive Art

Exposition Art Blog: Gustav Metzger - Auto-Destructive Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
Gustav Metzger (10 April 1926, Nuremberg – 1 March 2017, London) was an artist and political activist who developed the concept of Auto-Destructive Art and the Art Strike. Together with John Sharkey, he initiated the Destruction in Art Symposium in 1966. Metzger was recognised for his protests in the political and artistic realms.His experience of twentieth century society’s destructive capabilities led Metzger to a concentrated ‘formulation of what destruction is and what it might be in relation to art.’ He was known as a leading exponent of the Auto-Destructive Art and the Art Strike movements. He was also active in the Committee of 100 - a ‘named’ memberIn 1959, Metzger published the first auto-destructive manifesto Auto-Destructive Art. This was given as a lecture to the Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) in 1964, which was taken over by students as an artistic 'Happening’. The Architectural Association published, in 2015, a facsimile edition of Metzger’s lecture transcript. In 1962 he participated in the Festival of Misfits organised by members of the Fluxus group, at Gallery One, London.Guitarist Pete Townshend from The Who studied with Metzger, and during the 1960s, Metzger’s work was projected on screens at The Who concerts.In 2005, he selected EASTinternational which he proclaimed to be “The art exhibition without the art.“Throughout the 60 years that Metzger produced politically engaged works, he incorporated materials ranging from trash to old newspapers, liquid crystals to industrial materials, and even acid.”
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Exposition Art Blog: Isaac Witkin - New Generation of sculptors

Exposition Art Blog: Isaac Witkin - New Generation of sculptors | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Isaac Witkin (American, 1936–2006), Succoth, 1975. Steel. Gift of Jacques and Donatella Lennon, 91.2.1 | Isaac Witkin rejected the idea that the human figure is necessary to sculpture, and instead explored abstraction in his work. The sculpture consists of welded steel plates painted bright orange. Each plate has an irregular geometric shape, some straight and rigid and others elegantly curved. The sheets slice into one another, delicately balancing on precise contact points. Their sharp edges pierce the space around them, as if Witkin is not only carving the sculpture but also carving air. The overlapped and stacked forms allow for a constantly changing play of light and shadow, assuming different configurations based on the viewing angle. Witkin had a consistent interest in how the scale of a sculpture can be determined by its relationship to the human body. He once stated that “I aim to establish a freedom to move in multiaxial space in a way that draws the spectator in and around the sculpture to experience different aspects of an evolving dynamic.”


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Exposition Art Blog: Sigmar Polke - Pop Art

Exposition Art Blog: Sigmar Polke - Pop Art | Exposition Art Blog | Scoop.it
"Multi-media artist, Sigmar Polke, had the capacity to be at once irreverent, playful, and acerbic. From painting to photography and film to installations and prints, Polke's work, which often incorporated non-traditional materials and techniques, was above all a critique of art itself. Sometimes veiled and sometimes confrontational, the messages conveyed in his work raise serious questions about aesthetic, political, and social conventions..."


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