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Twice as many poor students attend universities since fees started

Twice as many poor students attend universities since fees started | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Since fees were introduced at universities in 1997, the amount of students from the bottom fifth of incomes has increased from 10  to 20 per cent.

ESRC's insight:

The article refers to a study by the ESRC-funded Centre for Global Higher Education

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Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits'

Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Teaching children to read using sounds rather than individual letters, the traditional method, has been found to be far more effective by researchers at the London School of Economics (LSE).

ESRC's insight:

The research was carried out by the ESRC-funded Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) 

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Heidi Williams Brown's curator insight, May 30, 2016 3:06 PM
This is an article about how beneficial teaching phonics is when teaching children to read.
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Children from poor homes 'facing bias'

Children from poor homes 'facing bias' | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Even when youngsters from lower income families perform as well as their classmates on independent tests, they are still less likely to be judged as 'above average', research suggests.

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Article cites findings using data from the ESRC-funded Millennium Cohort Study based at the Institute of Education

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Scientist locate obesity genes which affect our size and weight

Scientist locate obesity genes which affect our size and weight | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

These obesity genes seem to work by changing how the brain regulates appetite and energy use, rather than changing the body's metabolism, said the researchers, writing in the journal Nature.

ESRC's insight:

The article cites a study by the ESRC-funded Centre for Economic Performance.

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Jess Goris's curator insight, February 19, 2018 6:38 PM
- Just reading the headline by gears started to grind. Thinking of obesity being genetic kind of, possibly, crossed my mind before. Usually when children's parents are overweight or obese, their children tend to be as well...from what I have noticed.
- With the will power of knowing obesity is genetically linked to your DNA, you know exactly why you are more likely to gain the weight in your middle region of the body (stomach).
- "In fact, more than a fifth of the differences between people's weight can be explained by 'obesity genes' they said." This is so shocking to be me knowing that nearly 70% of americans are overweight/obese. This could be one of the reasons for that -- not just fast foods and unhealthy eating behaviours.
- In the article, they state that from studies they found how these genes affect people. Diseases such as diabetes and high cholesterol. With that being said, this could help them in future with ways to treat these diseases. I've always been told, when one door closes, the next one will open. They closed the door on trying to find what causes obesity because they finished their findings. Now, the next one opens with using this research for future reference when finding a cure for such diseases.
- "This means it might be possible to be both overweight and healthy." This makes so much sense to me because we know having a little bit of meat on our bones is always a good thing. Just because our waists aren't paper thin and stomachs flat as paper doesn't mean we're unhealthy. Just means you're overweight and healthy!
- It was also predicted that in the "future people can be screened to assess whether their weight meant they were likely to develop a disease."
- Going back to my first point saying overweight/obese parents tend to have overweight/obese children...the article later states "the two studies come after an analysis published yesterday suggested parents' lifestyle - rather than their genes - is responsible for their children being overweight." This is what I meant! A parent parents their children based off of how they were raised, so if they were raised in big portions, no exercise, unhealthy foods, they're more likely to feed their children that way -- it's the only way they are familiar with.
ALEX HALL's comment, May 4, 2018 4:17 AM
https://topweightlossteasaustralia.wordpress.com/2018/05/03/drinking-weight-loss-tea-your-lifestyle/
ScientificAnimations's comment, August 17, 2018 5:29 AM
In 1997, the WHO formally recognized obesity as a global epidemic. Let's pay attention to it. http://sco.lt/56vvhh
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Why wealthy, single men are the biggest drinkers in later life

Why wealthy, single men are the biggest drinkers in later life | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
A study found most over-45s cut their alcohol consumption after a ‘life event’ such as bereavement.
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The article cites an ESRC-funded study of 4,500 men and women in England.

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Only 1 in 20 unwed parents will stay together until first-born is 15

Only 1 in 20 unwed parents will stay together until first-born is 15 | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
Most young couples who do not get married are heading for a life of failed relationships and single parenthood, but many are put off marriage by the cost of a wedding, research suggests.
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Article references projections from Understanding Society, an ESRC-funded longitudinal study.

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Americans and Brits are genetically programmed to be MISERABLE 

Americans and Brits are genetically programmed to be MISERABLE  | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
  • Scientists at Warwick University discovered the gene responsible for serotonin levels in the brain is responsible for setting your mood
  • The shorter the gene, the lower the levels of the mood-enhancing hormone
  • Longer the gene the higher the levels of serotonin, thus people are happier
  • Danes found to be happiest, and have longest form of the gene
  • But those in France are most miserable, with the shortest form
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Article discussing research to be presented at the Happiness Around the World Festival of Social Science event.

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Minister set to offer further £2 million of grants in bid to make Britain female employment capital of Europe 

Minister set to offer further £2 million of grants in bid to make Britain female employment capital of Europe  | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
Almost half a million women are expected to enter the labour market by the start of 2016 – largely thanks to government tax breaks.
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The article cites the ESRC-funded Institute for Fiscal Studies.

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