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Understanding the challenges affecting Africa’s water economy

Understanding the challenges affecting Africa’s water economy | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

According to ReCirculate, 50% of Africans live in areas without adequate water and the number is expected to grow to 800 million people by 2025.

 

Joining CNBC Africa to discuss the challenges of Africa's water economy are Professor Nigel Paul Director for Global Eco-innovation at Lancaster University, Professor Kirk Semple, Director for International Engagement at the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University and Akanimo Odon, Africa Strategy Adviser for the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University.

ESRC's insight:

Director of ReCirculate, Nigel Paul and his colleague Kirk Semple were interviewed about the project on CNBC Africa.

 

ReCirculate is funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund, and managed on behalf of UKRI by ESRC.

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The decline of the gradable adverb: 'quite', 'rather' and 'fairly' are becoming a relic of the past

The decline of the gradable adverb: 'quite', 'rather' and 'fairly' are becoming a relic of the past | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
Tip-toeing around a subject, doing one’s best to avoid causing offence, and taking a little longer than necessary to get to the point are all quintessentially British conversational habits.
ESRC's insight:

This research was carried out by researchers at the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS)

 
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Teachers told to stop stressing about split infinitives, as study finds they are now part of everyday language

Teachers told to stop stressing about split infinitives, as study finds they are now part of everyday language | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
Splitting an infinitive and starting a sentence with “so” or “like” are all habits that any self-respecting grammar pedant would abhor.
ESRC's insight:

This research was carried out by the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) and Cambridge University Press. 

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Science finds surprising differences in men and women

Science finds surprising differences in men and women | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Ever wondered who out of women and men have the better memory? Or perhaps you’re curious to know who swears the most. The answers may surprise you…

ESRC's insight:

The article highlights findings from a study at the ESRC-funded Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) 

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Women have overtaken men in their use of profanities 

Women have overtaken men in their use of profanities  | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
Women are ten times as likely as men to say ‘s***’, according to a new survey carried out by the Social Research Council, Lancaster University and Cambridge University Press.
ESRC's insight:

Article cites research funded by the ESRC at Lancaster University and Cambridge University Press 

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Do you promise not to tell?

Do you promise not to tell? | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Professor Paul Baker talks to Stephen Fry on the BBC Radio 4 English Delights show focused o the mysterious appeal of secret language.

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Professor Paul Baker of the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences speaks to Stephen Fry on Radio 4 about coded language - specifically polari.

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Twitter expands anti-abuse arsenal, but has long way to go to silence trolls

Twitter expands anti-abuse arsenal, but has long way to go to silence trolls | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it

Those suffering abuse, threats, or generally unpleasant behaviour on Twitter – of which is there is much – may welcome Zero Trollerance, an initiative that aims to tackle trolls by bombarding them with tweets containing helpful life tips and advice on how to be less angry and aggressive.

ESRC's insight:

This article cites Claire Hardaker from the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) based at Lancaster University

Article originally published 27 April 2014