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'Good vibration' hand pumps boost Africa's water security

'Good vibration' hand pumps boost Africa's water security | ESRC press coverage | Scoop.it
The simple up-and-down motion of hand pumps could help scientists secure a key water source for 200 million people in Africa.

Via NERC Press Office
ESRC's insight:

The study cited in this article is funded by ESRC, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the DFID UPGro programme.

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8A NoemieP.'s curator insight, March 1, 2017 5:48 AM
This article is about how some low cost mobile sensors attached to a pump can help Africa's water security, for example help record the real depth of the water from the well. This helps me understand that Africa needs a lot of help with their water security. This makes me feel sad for many African people that doesn't have enough water and have to drink and use water that are unclean. Since unclean water can be dangerous for your health because of the bacteria inside of it, it also makes me feel lucky that I have enough clean water to drink everyday and not have to work hard to get water like many people in Africa. 
8B AlexL's curator insight, March 2, 2017 5:19 AM
        This article is about how the simple up-and-down motion of hand pumps could help secure water source for 200 million people in Africa. Demand for groundwater is putting pressure on the resource while researchers struggle to accurately estimate the future supply. Oxford University says that the pumps can solve the problem. Their study show that the pump can reach great depth of water. It is estimated to be 100 times greater than the annual renewable fresh resource. They discovered that when the water is being drawn from a deep rock, it produces different vibrations than when the liquid comes from a shallow one. 

         This article helps me understand Africa because now have a better understanding of how desperate Africans needed fresh water. I am grateful that there are hand pumps that can help secure water source for 200 million people in Africa. I think that there should be more hand pumps because Oxford University already proved to us that this method works.


8B YuminM's curator insight, March 2, 2017 10:31 AM
  The growing demands for groundwater is pressuring our resources, and scientists are trying to find out how much resources we have left for the future. In Africa, many people use pumps in order to get usable water. In 2012, the Oxford research team put on data transmitters on the water pumps, so they were able to get information about the amount of water extracted on a hourly basis. Also, if the pump didn't work, they were able to get to the pump quickly and fix it right away, instead of people having to wait like 3 days until the pump was fixed. Now, these scientists have found out that when the water is being drawn from a deep aquifer, it produces different vibrations than when the liquid comes from a shallow one.
   This can relate to what we are learning because we have learned about how much basic resources African people are lacking and how they're living in such bad conditions. This article is showing one tiny help for the Africans. If a pump suddenly didn't work, they couldn't get water supply from it for about 3 days, but now they are able to get water pretty soon since the pump is fixed in a few hours. I was glad reading this article that there are people out there really trying to help the Africans who are living in such terrible conditions, and I thought that I should really try to think of a way to help them too.
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Major risks to RMG involve restructuring issues other than political crisis

Major risks to sustainability and steady growth of the Bangladesh's readymade garment (RMG) industry involve proper and timely restructuring of this sector, according to participants at a high-profile consultation.

The participants including policy-makers, economists, industry experts, apparel exporters and representatives of development partners suggested focusing on restructuring issues, which they believe would be more difficult to address than the ongoing and future political crisis.

ESRC's insight:

The programme on upgradation and structural transformation of the garment sector was organised by the Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD) in association with London- based DFID- ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP).

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