Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
18.7K views | +16 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
onto Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
Scoop.it!

(Empathic Design) We Need More Empathy, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson

(Empathic Design)  We Need More Empathy, From the Notebook of Aaron Gustafson | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

by Aaron Gustafson


For a while now I’ve been beating the “empathy” drum (notes), trying to get folks in our industry to understand the importance of creating connections with the people for whom we build software, websites, etc. After all, we design and build tools to solve the needs of actual people, not some generic “user”.


==========================

Empathy is difficult when we are surrounded by others like us. We need to be surrounded by different people. 

====================

No comment yet.
Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
International information about empathy related to empathic design, human-centered design, design thinking.
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

See Magazine Front Page: All Sections

See Magazine Front Page: All Sections | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Photo of the Empathy Team doing the Acumen/IDEO Design Course.


More Empathic Design Links


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;



====================

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings 
and gives us more exposure
on Scoop.it. 

===========

Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Our Website CultureOfEmpathy.com

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Human-Centered Design–The Secret Sauce to Business Success +

Human-Centered Design–The Secret Sauce to Business Success + | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
3 Benefits of Human-Centered Design
1. Empathy-based
Now more than ever we have been made aware of the vital importance of seeing the world through others’ eyes. Considering other people’s perspectives is what empathy is all about. 

“If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from his angle as well as your own.” -Henry Ford

Empathy is the cornerstone of human-centered design. The best way to serve people is to get to know them. 
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathic Design and the Workplace of 2020

Empathic Design and the Workplace of 2020 | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Whether you’ve fully embraced working from home or are clamoring to get back to the normalcy of your organized work desk, the question on everyone’s mind seems to be, “when is it safe to go back to the office?” At Otherwise, we are zealous proponents of incorporating empathy into branding, and we believe that same practice extends into the physical space. So how could empathic design and the workplace call for a reimagined standard for the office?
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Adapting empathy maps for UX design

Adapting empathy maps for UX design | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

What is an empathy map?
An empathy map is a collaborative tool that teams can use to better understand their customers. It consists of an image of the customer surrounded by six sections.

 

These sections are:

  • Think and feel. What matters to the user? What occupies her thinking? What worries and aspirations does she have?
  • Hear. What are friends, family and other influencers saying to her that impacts her thinking?
  • See. What things in her environment influence her? What competitors is she seeing? What is she seeing friends do?
  • Say and do. What is her attitude towards others? What does she do in public? How has her behaviour changed?
  • Pain. What fears, frustrations or obstacles is she facing?
  • Gain. What is she hoping to get? What does success look like?
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

6 Tips for Building Empathy

6 Tips for Building Empathy | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Design thinking and empathy go hand in hand. Empathizing with customers is the only way to understand their needs and challenges, and devise ways for your products, services and projects to address them. In other words, empathy is great fodder for innovation.

Sound simple enough? In theory, it should be. But figuring out how to empathize with customers doesn’t come naturally to every team. Interacting with customers in their own environment can be uncomfortable and time-consuming. It might mean embracing skills you don’t often use.

Here are some techniques that can help you get the most from your efforts to engage:

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

The Empathy Economy Is Booming, but What Happens When Our Emotional Connections to Others Are Designed, Packaged, and Sold?

The Empathy Economy Is Booming, but What Happens When Our Emotional Connections to Others Are Designed, Packaged, and Sold? | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
At the front of the room, Sub Rosa’s founder and CEO, Michael Ventura, stood before the glowing screen. Tall with long dark hair, a beard, and fashionably casual clothes, he exuded a kind of urban shaman vibe. As one of the Fast Track sessions at the Fast Company Innovation Festival, the 90-minute workshop promised to introduce attendees to Sub Rosa’s Applied Empathy methodology, a corporate leadership approach designed to “drive internal cultural change, build better products, and connect [businesses] more deeply with [their] audiences.”

 

Ventura authored a book titled Applied Empathy and designed an Applied Empathy card game called Questions & Empathy that he describes as “a highbrow Cards Against Humanity—it escalates you from small talk to big talk ultra fast.” 

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Five Emerging Trends in Design Thinking for 2020 - Dana Mitroff Silvers

Five Emerging Trends in Design Thinking for 2020 - Dana Mitroff Silvers | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
1. There is a “back-to-basics” focus on the fundamental mindsets and skills of design thinking.


I‘ve observed a growing demand from both nonprofit and for-profit organizations for support and training around the fundamentals, such as active listening skills and empathy-building methods.

While more and more employees have been exposed to the overall design thinking process, there is a sense that some of the essentials have been neglected.

 

This to me represents a sophisticated understanding of the design thinking framework, as a good design thinker is only as good as their foundational skills.


In addition to active listening and empathy-building, other fundamentals include comfort with ambiguity, a bias to action, group facilitation skills, and an ability to mindfully separate convergent from divergent activities.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking For School Marketing: Empathize With Your Community

Design Thinking For School Marketing: Empathize With Your Community | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Empathize With Your Community
Design thinking is a unique framework due to its emphasis on two phases that many other frameworks/mindsets don’t address: empathize and define. When these steps are overlooked, leaders often end up missing the core problem due to poorly diagnosing the needs of their intended audience.

 

When your audience/community is different from place-to-place, as is the case within the education space, a “one size fits all” approach is likely to fall short. As micro-schools and personalized learning continue to grow and school districts shift to fit the modern age, it has become more urgent than ever to immerse yourself and tailor your strategic marketing plan to the specific community that you are trying to serve.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking for Employee Engagement: Stage 1 – Use Empathy to Understand your Employees

Design Thinking for Employee Engagement: Stage 1 – Use Empathy to Understand your Employees | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Stage 1 – Use Empathy to Understand your Employees
Let’s start with stage one: empathy. Design thinking starts by listening to the most important person – and no, that’s not the CEO or the HR Director.

Instead, it’s that person who’ll be consuming your products: the humble, yet demanding, end user. For HR managers, that’s your employees.

Instead of jumping to engagement solutions (free fruit, anyone?), you’ll start by empathising. Empathy is about observing the facts and feelings from your employees’ point of view.

The best way to do this at scale is through an anonymous Engagement, Pulse or Exit survey.

Include a mix of question types: Allow for open-ended answers as well as likert scales. Collating the data is much easier if you have a single survey tool where all the result are in one dashboard.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Can We Design Without Empathizing?

Can We Design Without Empathizing? | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Empathy involves asking ‘WHY' while designing;  Researchers & designers conduct workshops with clients and study users to identify the needs & challenges by empathizing with them which were not articulated by the stakeholders before. As a people skill, empathy helps in understanding - how the stakeholders & users perceive any problem within the context, how they feel about it and react in different situations. 

 

There are different approaches to generate requirements in various product development methods - agile, lean startup, waterfall, scrum, etc. One of the approaches that Lollypop team believes in is - Human Centred Design (HCD) Thinking, where we empathize with the users & stakeholders to address any problem-solution. 

 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

How to Develop an Empathic Approach in Design Thinking | Interaction Design Foundation

How to Develop an Empathic Approach in Design Thinking | Interaction Design Foundation | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Empathy requires us to put aside our learning, culture, knowledge, opinions, and worldview purposefully in order to understand other peoples’ experiences of things deeply and meaningfully. It requires a strong sense of imagination for us to be able to see through another person’s eyes.

 

It requires humility so we can seek to abandon our preconceived ideas and biases. It requires that we have a heightened awareness of other peoples’ needs, wants, motivations and goals. Let’s go through the traits an empathic observer should possess—and some methods you can use to gain a deep understanding of the people for whom you are designing.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Deradicalization through Dialogue: Interview with Daryl Davis | Subverse News  

Daryl Davis, renowned for deradicalizing KKK members spoke at the Minds IRL event on Saturday in Philadelphia, which brought together speakers across the political spectrum to speak about ending racism, violence, and authoritarianism. Subverse spoke with Davis about his thoughts on the event and why having these conversations are important.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Biomimicry and Other Design Processes: "Design Thinking is an empathic, human-centered approach to innovation"

Biomimicry and Other Design Processes: "Design Thinking is an empathic, human-centered approach to innovation" | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Design Thinking is an empathic, human-centered approach to innovation that has become prominent in design and business circles in recent decades. In the image below we have modified a Design Thinking diagram used by the Hasso Plattner Institute for Design (aka “d.School”) at Stanford University, to show how biomimicry concepts can fit into the framework.

Whereas design thinking emphasizes beginning the design process with empathy for users, in a biomimetic concept we could extend that concern to include all life

 

. During the “define” step one would identify the function and context necessary for the solution and formulate questions for biology research. The “ideate” step then includes searching biology for inspiration, translating strategies and considering nature’s unifying patterns. And finally, the “test” step includes evaluating whether the resulting design is ultimately life-friendly.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking: Getting Started with Empathy | Interaction Design Foundation

Design Thinking: Getting Started with Empathy | Interaction Design Foundation | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Empathy is an important element in Design Thinking and Human-Centred Design.

 

What is empathy exactly?

 

Why is empathy so important to designing solutions that actually work for people? Here, we’ll not only look at what empathy means, but will also look at how it helps design thinkers create solutions that work and, conversely, how a lack of empathy can result in product failure. We’ll also come to understand the empowering notion that everyone can master empathy and design truly human-centred solutions.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathy in Design: From Mindset to Practice

Empathy in Design: From Mindset to Practice | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Design thinking offers hope, and holds promise, for designing significant change. In a world fraught with misunderstanding and habitual polarization, innovation leading in the direction of a more humane world is tempting.

Empathy is one of seven key mindsets described by Ideo to guide human-centred design. By putting yourself in the shoes of the person you are designing for and understanding their lives, you will be better equipped to design innovative solutions to their challenges. 
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

20 pointers for weaving empathy through human centered design | by Lara Truelove | Jul, 2020

20 pointers for weaving empathy through human centered design | by Lara Truelove | Jul, 2020 | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

“Empathy is when you can feel what another person is feeling. Empathy is the foundation of a human-centered design process; by deeply understanding people we are able to better design for them. “ — Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Why I Don’t Believe in Empathic Design  

Why I Don’t Believe in Empathic Design   | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
 

Human-centered design pioneer Don Norman, who coined the term ‘user experience,’ explains why he’s not convinced by the current obsession with empathy and what we should do instead.

 

I approve of the spirit behind the introduction of empathy into design, but I believe the concept is impossible, and even if possible, wrong. The reason we often talk about empathy in design is that we really need to understand the people that we’re working for. The idea is that, essentially, you’re in a person’s head and understand how they feel and what they think.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathy Mapping in Design Thinking.

Empathy Mapping in Design Thinking. | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Mapping is one of the many visual and graphic ways used to solve problems or challenges and is extensively used by designers, marketers and problem solvers to be able to develop a deeper understanding of a specific area.

Empathy Mapping is a simple but effective tool used to visualize user/consumer/ target market attitudes and behaviors. By making the map visual and directing the inquiry at a specific target we are able to build a much better picture of our market. It’s often the case that these kinds of maps can reveal where we have gaps in our existing data and where we have made assumptions.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathy. The single most important attribute of Design Leaders

Empathy. The single most important attribute of Design Leaders | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Empathy is as vital to the success of a project as a big idea and beautiful crafting. It is not a skill taught on most design degrees, but…

  • stepping away from your own preferences and priorities
  • digging into real consumer needs and behaviour
    observing without judgement
  • getting under the skin of market and business dynamics
    actively listening and seeking to understand;
  • … are all essential in developing greater empathy and work powerfully in delivering deeper consumer insights and uncovering the motivations and decision-making parameters of business leaders. 
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

How Design Thinking Leads to a Better Minimum Viable Product

How Design Thinking Leads to a Better Minimum Viable Product | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

The Five Stages of Design Thinking 
The design thinking process covers five phases: empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test. The framework is iterative, flexible, and involves the collaboration of product teams and actual customers to create mobile products inspired by how users think, feel, and act. 

1. The Empathize Stage
Building customer empathy involves a deep understanding of the problems and realities of the people you are designing for.

Good UX design leaves a lasting impression. Many companies struggle when it comes to developing an MVP that evokes meaning and forms a connection with customers. Many products in the market are aesthetically pleasing and usable but still lack purpose. It’s essential to determine what impression the product is leaving with its users. This distinction is the difference between an app that customers return to and one they uninstall. Empathizing with customers is essential for creating this connection. As much as possible, business stakeholders need to step outside their frame of reference and understand the customer to develop a mobile solution that stands out in the market. 

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathy | Interaction Design Foundation

Empathy | Interaction Design Foundation | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

The full list of UX literature that deals with Empathy, from the world’s biggest and most authoritative library of UX design resources.

What is Empathy?

Design Thinking cannot begin without a deeper understanding of the people you are designing for. In order to gain those insights, it is important for you as a design thinker to empathize with the people you’re designing for so that you can understand their needs, thoughts, emotions and motivations. The good news is that you have a wide range of methods at your command for learning more about people. The even better news is this: with enough mindfulness and experience, anyone can become a master at empathizing with people.

 

"Engaging with people directly reveals a tremendous amount about the way they think and the values they hold. Sometimes these thoughts and values are not obvious to the people who hold them. A deep engagement can surprise both the designer and the designee by the unanticipated insights that are different from what they actually do - are strong indicators of their deeply held beliefs about the way the world is."
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathy, the keystone of Design Thinking, techniques to succeed and why do we fail to be user-centric?

Empathy, the keystone of Design Thinking, techniques to succeed and why do we fail to be user-centric? | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

In our previous article, we described how design thinking built upon empathy and intuition to identify critical user requirements and define imaginative ways to resolve their needs. In this post, we are going deeper into this user-centered process as the keystone to conceive and create a successful innovative product, service or process.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Why I Don’t Believe in Empathic Design

Why I Don’t Believe in Empathic Design | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Human-centered design pioneer Don Norman, who coined the term ‘user experience,’ explains why he’s not convinced by the current obsession with empathy and what we should do instead.
I approve of the spirit behind the introduction of empathy into design, but I believe the concept is impossible, and even if possible, wrong.

 

The reason we often talk about empathy in design is that we really need to understand the people that we’re working for. The idea is that, essentially, you’re in a person’s head and understand how they feel and what they think.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Why Empathy?

Why Empathy? | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Barack Obama famously said:

“If we hope to meet the moral test of our times... then I think we’re going to have to talk more about the empathy deficit. The ability to put ourselves in somebody else’s shoes, to see the world through somebody else’s eyes.”

Empathy has the power to understand others and allows us to enter imaginatively into their thoughts and feelings and therefore respond in an appropriate way.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

What Is Empathetic Design?

What Is Empathetic Design? | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
What is empathetic design?
Empathetic design (not to be confused with empathic design, a common design methodology) is, simply put, designing with a level of empathy for your audience. The opposite would be apathetic design—which is often a result of the “I’m a designer” effect.

Empathetic design is not necessarily just the practice of buzzword-filled “User Experience Design” practices. Empathetic design is the fundamental understanding of how people use the tools that you build. It’s not about users and testing (though those are important too). It’s about people. Empathetic design is about being a person, designing for other people. Understanding that your website that you create for your business to communicate with your audience is a tool that will be used by people is the first step in creating an empathetic website.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathy and the Design Process - UX Planet

Empathy and the Design Process - UX Planet | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
The topic of empathy has been circling around for quite some time, particularly since it’s one of the pillars of the Design Thinking Process (established under the “Understand” component of the process). Empathy is also a topic that keeps being written about from multiple Authors, who try to emphasize the fact that Designers are only successful when they empathize and fully embrace the users they’re creating a solution for.

 

The idea for this article sprung up, not because I want to demystify what others have written so well, but mostly because I want to empirically showcase what I’ve observed from going through multiple Product Design teams and applications/software products deployed to the market, and what role Empathy truly played. Also as a highlight, I highly recommend a thorough read on this article hailing from the phenomenal Don Norman on the topic of Empathy. It’s a testament to a different perspective on the concept of Empathy in Design from a genial author.

No comment yet.