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5 ways tech has changed professional development

5 ways tech has changed professional development | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Technology has not only changed the way students learn but also the way educators grow through professional development. We talked with tech-savvy, leadership-oriented teachers, principals and professional development organizations to find out what’s trending.


Via Nik Peachey, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

I chose this article because it speaks to the new trends in professional development  through technology.   

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 31, 2015 3:26 PM

I've written and presented a lot about this myself, so good to see more focus coming on it from the educational online press.

Bradley Gomoluch's comment, July 31, 2015 3:30 PM
Sorry Nik, I scooped the article and tried to respond with my own comment but it use yours.
Bradley Gomoluch's comment, July 31, 2015 3:31 PM
I wanted to say that with the increased emphasis on collaboration technology makes it possible and to have PD offered for free is great for teachers.
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7 things every kid should master | Susan Engel | The Boston Globe

7 things every kid should master | Susan Engel | The Boston Globe | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

In the past few years, parents, teachers, and policy makers have furiously debated whether standardized tests should be used to promote or hold back children, fire teachers, and withhold funds from schools. The debate has focused for the most part on whether the tests are being used in unfair ways. But almost no one has publicly questioned a fundamental assumption — that the tests measure something meaningful or predict something significant beyond themselves.

I have reviewed more than 300 studies of K–12 academic tests. What I have discovered is startling. Most tests used to evaluate students, teachers, and school districts predict almost nothing except the likelihood of achieving similar scores on subsequent tests. I have found virtually no research demonstrating a relationship between those tests and measures of thinking or life outcomes.

When you hear people debate the use of tests in schools, the talk usually assumes that the only alternative to the current approach is no testing at all. But nothing could be further from the truth. Ideally, everyone would benefit from objective measures of children’s learning in schools. The answer is not to abandon testing, but to measure the things we most value, and find good ways to do that. How silly to measure a child’s ability to parse a sentence or solve certain kinds of math problems if in fact those measures don’t predict anything important about the child or lead to better teaching practices.

Why not test the things we value, and test them in a way that provides us with an accurate picture of what children really do, not what they can do under the most constrained circumstances after the most constrained test preparation? Nor should this be very difficult. After all, in the past 50 years economists and psychologists have found ways to measure things as subtle and dynamic as the mechanisms that explain when and why we give in to impulse, the forces that govern our moral choices, and the thought processes that underlie unconscious stereotyping.

Here are seven abilities and dispositions that kids should acquire or improve upon — and therefore should be measured — while in school. One key feature of the system I am suggesting is that it depends, like good research, on representative samples rather than on testing every child every year. We’d use less data, to better effect, and free up the hours, days, and weeks now spent on standardized test prep and the tests themselves, time that could be spent on real teaching and learning.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Article on 7 areas that should be measured in the area of student growth.

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 23, 2015 5:10 PM

Talking about testing and student growth, this article focuses on 7 areas that should be measured. 

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Making the Middle Grades Matter | U.S. Department of Education

Making the Middle Grades Matter | U.S. Department of Education | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Arne Duncan acknowledgesthe EdSource report, "Gaining Ground in the Middle: Why Some Schools Do Better"



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I'm pleased to be here this evening for a couple of reasons.

Schools to Watch is doing absolutely invaluable work in the middle grades. You are helping to lead the field in middle grade reform—and as a nation, we do far too little to celebrate success in education.

At the same time, I am glad to have this opportunity to speak this evening because the subject of middle grade reform is vitally important—even if it is little understood and often overlooked.

As you know, the middle grade years have sometimes been called the "Bermuda Triangle" of K-12 education. It's a time where students sink or swim, and sail into choppy waters with few pedagogical stars by which to navigate. Scholars in the field have described the history of middle grades reform as marked by "continual tinkering and persistent dissatisfaction."

It doesn't have to be that way. Today, groundbreaking research by Robert Balfanz at John Hopkins University, and by EDSource and Michael Kirst at Stanford University, is illuminating how middle grade educators can both boost academic achievement and reduce dropout rates. And many of those effective practices have been embraced by the nearly 100 Schools to Watch award winners honored here tonight.

Educators now widely recognize the middle grade years, from the ages of 10 to 15, as a special, critical period of adolescent development.

Just as high-quality early childhood programs are vital to readying young children for elementary school, high-quality middle grade schooling is equally essential to readying young adolescents for high school, college, and careers. In high-poverty schools in particular, the middle grades can either put students on a path to college and careers—or it can steer them to dropping out and the unemployment line.

And just as is the case in preschool, early intervention is easier—and more cost-effective than waiting until high school.

It is no secret that parents and educators alike know the middle grade years as a period of immense change and considerable turmoil. Yet the middle grades also present the last, best opportunity for educators to reach all students—and not just those who persist and thrive in high school. Early adolescence is the wonder years and the worry years. It's a time of great promise—and of great peril.

Fortunately, educators and school leaders know a lot more today about guiding young adolescents through the middle grades than they did just a few years ago. As former first lady Laura Bush says, "we know now from research that a lot of kids that drop out in high school really drop out in middle school—they just leave in high school."

Robert Balfanz's research, for example, shows that it is possible to identify about 75 percent of future dropouts in large, high-poverty urban schools before they enter high school. Think about how critically important that early identification is.

The three warning flags in middle school are poor attendance, withdrawing from or posting poor grades in English Language Arts and Math, and racking up a record of misbehavior and suspensions. In fact, in high-poverty neighborhoods, Balfanz found that half or more of middle grade students were missing at least a month of schooling.

These three warning flags underscore the vital importance of a simple yet often neglected idea that Schools to Watch has embraced: High-poverty middle schools should be setting up early warning systems to monitor the telltale warning signs and indicators for dropping out.

Early warnings are a call to action. Middle grade educators should identify students at risk of dropping out—and intervene early. In sixth grade, most students at high-risk for dropping out are struggling in only a single academic subject or behavioral area—unlike in high school, where students who drop out typically have multiple academic and behavioral problems.

Now, as important as early warning systems are, they are only part of the answer for what works and doesn't work to advance student learning in the middle grades.

Frankly, I think middle grade educators have spent too much of their time in recent years in age-old debates about the best-suited grade configurations and organizational models of teachers and classroom instruction for young adolescents. But they have spent too little of their time identifying and promoting practices that improve academic outcomes for young adolescents.

Several years ago, Steven Mertens, a middle grades expert at the University of Illinois, described the research in this field as being "woefully behind in producing the types of scientific, rigorous studies necessary to measure the effectiveness of the middle school philosophy in improving the educational settings, practices, and programs for young adolescents."

The most critical gap, Mertens said, was the scarcity "of good, reliable research studies that have been able to demonstrate . . . [a] link between the components of the middle school philosophy and any type of teaching or learning outcome." At best, Mertens could only identify "a handful of rigorous and generalizable studies linking [program] components" to student achievement.

Since Mertens wrote those words in 2006, educators for the first time have high-quality, large-scale studies of what works and what doesn't work to improve student outcomes in the middle grades—particularly the 2010 "Gaining Ground" study by EdSource, Michael Kirst, and the American Institutes for Research.

So, yes, the middle grades are emerging from the fog of the Bermuda Triangle. And I'm pleased to say that they are emerging full-steam with bipartisan support and interest. I was delighted to see Laura Bush recently announce that the Bush Institute was launching a comprehensive, research-based program to accelerate middle school achievement and readiness for high school.

The "Gaining Ground" report that I referred to a moment ago is the largest study of its kind. EdSource and Stanford University researchers analyzed data and test scores from more than 200,000 students at 303 middle grade schools in California for the 2008-09 school year. They also surveyed the principal at each school, more than 3,700 ELA and math teachers in grades six thru eight, and over 150 district superintendents.

The principal finding of the Gaining Ground study is that a relentless and "intense schoolwide focus on improving academic outcomes most distinguishes higher-[performing] from lower-performing middle grades schools." That conclusion, says Trish Williams of EdSource, "came out on top no matter which analysis we ran."

What did higher-performing middle schools do to boost student achievement? Principals and teachers made it both a personal and a shared mission to get every student ready for high school and beyond. They set measurable goals for student progress on standards-based tests—and they tightly aligned standards to curriculum and instruction.

Principals met frequently with teachers to review data on student performance. And teachers mined formative and benchmark assessments for areas where they could improve their instruction and identify students that needed additional support and early intervention.

At the higher-performing schools, teachers worked to accelerate learning for all students. But they gave special attention to students who were two or more years behind grade level, and to the assessment and placement needs of ELL students. At-risk students, for example, got extra instructional time during the school day and school year.

As you might expect, teachers collaborated frequently at these schools to discuss curriculum, improve instruction, and target students for help.

Yet higher-performing schools were also highly structured and purposeful. They had strong principals who set firm disciplinary policies. Their school leaders had no tolerance for bullying, drugs, and weapons on campus, and set clear performance standards for the behavior, academics, and participation of students who wished to remain enrolled at the school.

Finally, the higher-performing schools were institutions where the adults were accountable. They took responsibility for improved student outcomes. Principals reported being evaluated by the superintendent based, in part, on student success. At higher-performing, high-poverty schools, the evaluation of teachers was also based, in part, on student progress and achievement data, along with multiple indicators of performance.

What is most striking about the higher-performing middle schools was that they saw data and the frequent use of assessments as a blessing, not as a burden.

Teachers regularly used data and formative assessments to improve their instruction. And teaching to the standards was not a drill-and-kill exercise but a way to provide a rich and rigorous curriculum. These schools don't just preach—they practice the cycle of continuous improvement.

Despite claims that standards-based instruction in math and ELA narrows the curriculum, the EdSource study found that higher-performing middle schools actually had a higher proportion of students "in extracurricular activities and electives, including the arts and exploratory courses and mini-courses." That finding comes straight out of the "Middle Grades Playbook" action kit for superintendents and principals that EdSource released yesterday.

I have talked about the EdSource study at length for a couple of reasons. First, it provides a rich, evidence-based guide to improving student achievement in the middle grades.

Second, EdSource's findings are entirely consistent with the policies and incentives the Obama administration has created in Race to the Top and our blueprint to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

They affirm the value of our State Longitudinal Data System grants as well, which support state and district efforts to develop data systems needed to monitor student progress and establish early warning indicators.

One final but little-noticed finding of the Gaining Ground study is important not only to middle grade reform but the broader debate taking place in the nation about the power of great schools.

Like countless studies before it, the Gaining Ground study shows that the skills of students in September when they walk in the classroom door is heavily influenced by socioeconomic background. But the study also found enormous variation in student performance and growth over the course of the school year, even among schools with similar student populations.

School and district practices can have a big impact on student outcomes, regardless of student background. And Robert Balfanz reached the same conclusion in his research on middle grade students in Philadelphia. In schools with similar student bodies, some Philadelphia schools had three times as many students making gap-closing gains as other schools.

Great schools, great principals, and great teachers matter. The good news is that poverty is not destiny in the classroom.

The bad news is that we still have a long way to go before every child is provided a world-class education. The sobering, painful truth is that, too often, our P-12 education system is failing to live up to the essential American promise of equal opportunity in the middle grades.

Compared to the performance of their peers in high-performing nations, American students do pretty well in elementary school. But the performance of 15-year old students in the U.S. is mediocre.

In America, as students accrue more schooling and move through the middle grades, they actually fall further behind their peers in high-performing countries. That is totally unacceptable. And it is an urgent national problem. Other nations are out-educating us, plain and simple. And in today's knowledge economy, the country that out-educates us will out-compete us too.

So in my time left, I want to talk about some of the challenges that I see ahead for middle grades educators as they seek to advance and accelerate student learning.

As this Schools to Watch conference shows, middle grades reform efforts are now finding a lot of common ground. There is a growing recognition today that middle school improvement efforts must be propelled and evaluated based on outcomes, not inputs.

At the same time, middle grades reform is a tough balancing act. To accelerate learning, the middle grades must be rigorous but relevant, engaging but exacting, and content-rich but crafted for early adolescent learners.

I congratulate all the STW award winning schools represented here today because you are demonstrating how to achieve that demanding balancing act every day. You are pursuing the evidence-based practices that boost learning outcomes for young adolescents.

Many of you have worked long and hard to develop a building-wide commitment to continuous data analysis and instructional improvement. You're developing and implementing early warning indicator systems, using real-time data to target student interventions.

STW's $6 million Invest in Innovation grant from our i3 program supports cutting-edge work. STW is seeking to dramatically improve student achievement in 18 persistently low-performing schools in the middle grades in California, Illinois, and North Carolina. This i3 program could reach 18,000 students in urban and rural schools. Success will be measured by multiple indicators, including test scores, course grades, course-taking behavior, student attendance, and suspensions and expulsions.

In addition to helping these schools develop an early indicators intervention system, STW will also provide a mentor school, a trained coach to work with the school leadership, and a principal coach.

In a number of respects, STW's innovative model is similar to that of Shanghai's, the highest-performing education system in the world on the last PISA assessment. Shanghai educators also pair up high-performing schools with low-performing schools and have expert teachers and mentors assist their peers.

I love the idea that STW is trying to replicate success, scale-up turnaround work, and make success the norm.

A number of aspects of middle grade reform are starting to filter down to the district level as well. In Chicago, we established an early warning indicators system district-wide for ninth graders. But several aspects of the early warning system radiated back to the middle grades.

Once we started running our early indicators system and tracking graduation data, we found that up to a third of entering high school freshmen were overage—and many students had given little thought to matching their interests to high school offerings.

So we established Achievement Academies in about 10 high schools modeled after the John Hopkins Talent Development model. Roughly 125 students per academy had their own set of teachers, counselors, and administrators in their neighborhood high schools.

We also created and instituted a career exploration inventory that 6th and 7th graders took, so they could be more purposeful about selecting from the city's 120 high schools and 200 high school programs. And we established a five-week Freshman Connection program for rising ninth graders that matched students to their new high school and gave the students a chance to explore high school options.

Students who needed to attend summer school before high school, students with disabilities, and students in alternative education settings were all included in the Freshman Connection program. In the morning, students attended academic classes. In the afternoons, they went on field trips, did cultural activities, and visited colleges. Each year, about 18,000 of the 33,000 entering freshmen in the city attended the Freshman Connection.

These were all important first steps. But we also ran into obstacles in our efforts to make the middle grades more rigorous in Chicago.

Nationwide, fewer than one in four middle school teachers have received specialized training to teach at the middle school level before they begin their careers, even though 46 states plus the District of Columbia offer some form of middle grades licensure. Too often, middle school teachers are prepared for general ed placement, rather than focusing on content knowledge. That shortfall in content-specific training made it much tougher to offer Algebra in eighth grade in Chicago.

As a result, we worked closely with foundations and universities to enable teachers to get the math and science endorsements they would need, so middle grade students would have teachers with subject knowledge. Before long, the Board passed a policy that middle grade science and math openings had to be filled by teachers with an endorsement.

Looking back, I also feel that we fell short of creating universally safe middle schools in Chicago. To be honest, this is a problem that continues to haunt me. The level of violence that our children had to live with in their communities was staggering.

And I don't believe that middle grade school leaders and reformers have devoted enough of their attention to minimizing crime and bullying—and maximizing students' sense of safety.

One of the most disturbing reports to cross my desk in recent months was the annual School Survey on Crime and Safety.

It shows that middle schools report higher rates of violent crime, serious violent crime, student threats of physical attacks with or without a weapon, bullying, and sexual harassment than even high schools. In fact, in most cases, the risk of violent crime is substantially higher in middle school—and sometimes double the risk that students face in high school. Middle schools are every bit as dangerous if not more so than high schools, even when figures are limited to violent incidents reported to the police.

Tragically, a subset of middle schools is extremely violent. In the 2007-08 school year, 40 percent of middle schools recorded 20 or more violent incidents reported to the police. That is a devastating statistic.

The middle grades are clearly no longer the age of innocence—and the mission of middle grade school leaders and educators to create safe schools must take on new urgency. I hope that you will leave here today with a renewed sense of urgency—both to make the middle grades safe, and to dramatically accelerate achievement for all young adolescents.

But I hope, too, that you will leave here with a tremendous sense of hope and possibility, despite the collective challenges we face.

It matters a great deal that poverty is not destiny in the classroom. And middle school educators know far more today than in the past about the most effective tools for early intervention and accelerating student learning.

Every day, great teachers and school leaders are working in your schools with the knowledge that they are making a difference in the lives of their students, even in the face of difficult circumstances.

You are tackling the tough problems of chronically underperforming schools. You are helping your peers improve.

That commitment, that collaboration, and that courage is finally giving the middle grade years the attention they have long deserved.

Thank you—and congratulations again to your award winners.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Good information on middle schools making academic progress.  Another middle school was added to my assignment next year.  Some good information to think about while supporting my middle schools.  

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, June 27, 2015 9:35 AM

An article about middle grades making academic progress.    

Rog Rothe's curator insight, June 27, 2015 11:04 AM

I scooped this because I teach Middle Level, and because they are the most important years for students.  I hope that you take away the concern that leaders have for students in regards to middle level students.

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Classroom Management - Reward Ideas

Find free reward ideas, activities and resources for your primary and secondary classroom. (RT @sarina_testa: Stuck on classroom management? Well look no further!


Via Angela DesBarres, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Really great ideas on incentives and positive rewards with students.  

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 18, 2015 12:44 PM

Great ideas, a wonderful list of incentives. Positive reinforcement ideas. 

Hanna Kim's curator insight, February 18, 2016 9:54 PM

This site has so many ideas how to reward children to make it fun.

Jhon Carvajal's curator insight, April 26, 2016 3:21 PM
Ideas that will get the attention of your students and get them to behave well during your class
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Gazette » Six Easy Resolutions for the New Year at School

Gazette » Six Easy Resolutions for the New Year at School | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
The new calendar year doesn't bring a new class, but it does bring the perfect opportunity to try new things, revamp classroom routines and re-energize yourself! Here are some that resolutions are easy to achieve and just ...

Via Angela DesBarres, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Good point and I am always looking at ways to re-energize the teachers I support.

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 18, 2015 12:57 PM

A good point, try something new and re-energize teachers! 

Jason Smith's curator insight, July 18, 2015 1:00 PM

Great article on starting the new year

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A Principal's Reflections: A Title Doesn't Make You a Leader

A Principal's Reflections: A Title Doesn't Make You a Leader | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

I pondered just sending out the title of this post as a tweet – short, sweet (well not so much), and to the point.  Instead of just throwing out a sound bite into the social media abyss a detailed explanation is in order.  Now here’s why.  As of late I have been working with a greater number of teachers across the country on digital leadership and learning.  During the many conversations that ensue over the course of the workshop a common theme has developed and that is real change can only come from the adults that have a specific title such as Board of Education member, superintendent, other central office administrators, principals, supervisors, etc. Immediately upon hearing this I share stories of many “leaders” by title that I have come in contact with over the years, or observed from afar, that did anything but lead.  I would also bet that I am not the only one who feels this way either. 


Via Patti Kinney, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Good insight on what makes a leader.   

Ben Bempong's curator insight, July 29, 2015 1:59 PM

Amen to this article.  Some leaders get caught to much into the title where as a title is just a title.  Its the individual that makes the title and not the title that makes the individual.  As a leader, it is important to at times let go of the title, and do your best in you position to facilitate change and lead by example.

Rog Rothe's curator insight, July 30, 2015 12:30 AM

I scooped this  because I totally agree with Ben's take on how a title doesn't make you a leader, being a leader and challenging the establishment makes you a leader.  We have an epidemic of followers as leaders and it impedes the process of change when our "leaders" are ineffective, at best!

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 31, 2015 3:12 PM

I agree a title doesn't make you a leader. This was a good article and great insight on how a teacher might really thing that change needs to come from a person with a title. Teachers are leaders and more importantly role models for students and parents. They have a great impact on change.    

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Which of These 4 Types of Leaders Are You?

Which of These 4 Types of Leaders Are You? | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
You want to lead from your strengths. But first you have to know what they are.

Via Dean J. Fusto
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Good read and information on what leadership type you may be and how you can build on your strengths and weaknesses.

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From Technology Integration to Learning… by Design

From Technology Integration to Learning… by Design | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Rebecca Wilkins
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Really like this graphic of technology integration and learning by design.

Drora Arussy's curator insight, May 31, 2013 8:42 AM

A great tool for self-evaluation and for those of us who consult, a great way to explain to our teachers the where why when and how's of technology integration.

Dean Mantz's curator insight, January 1, 2014 2:09 PM

This is a well developed table addressing the integration of technology into classroom instruction all while basing pedagogy via the Learning By Design framework. 

Rebecca Wilkins's curator insight, July 17, 2015 9:22 PM

This is a nice marriage of technology integration and UbD.

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9 Ideas Education Is Having Trouble Responding To ~ TeachThought

9 Ideas Education Is Having Trouble Responding To ~ TeachThought | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

by Terry Heick

 

"As education changes, it depends primarily on internal catalysts for that change. That is, the “things” that change it are on the “inside” of that system itself, most notably data, assessment, PLCs, and running a distant fourth, technology. It’s interesting that technology is among the least impacting “agents of change” in the classroom. Certainly it has caused teachers and districts to update some of their practices (e.g., budgets, teacher training, and IT policies) but very little of their thinking (e.g., peer-to-peer and school-to-school collaboration, assessment forms, and learning models).

"At some point, this will change. Eventually the tethers will break and education–in whatever form or forms–will shoot forward like it’s been held back in a slingshot for nearly a century. It may not feel triumphant at first. When things you lean on give way, you flail and panic and yelp. There will probably be a lot of that. It may be messy, implementation dip and all. It will require innovation and perseverance. But if we are courageous enough to let these ideas “break” education, we have the chance to come out on the other side evolved."


Via Jim Lerman
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Really great thoughts on current changes in education and how the future will look in the world of education.  Emphasis on technology.

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Top Free Software Picks: Video Conferencing

Top Free Software Picks: Video Conferencing | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Brush your hair and iron your shirt because with these video conferencing programs you'll be coming in loud and clear.

Via HeatherFrancekelly, Vikki Coleman
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

I chose this article because it provides a list of free (or very little cost) video conferencing programs/apps/sites and explores the features of each.  

 

I hope others find this resource useful with implementing video conferencing in the classroom.

 

 

Vikki Coleman's curator insight, August 1, 2015 10:24 AM

I chose this article because it provides a list of free (or very little cost) video conferencing programs/apps/sites and explores the features of each.  It tells which allow one-to-one video conferencing and group conferencing.  Video conferencing is an excellent way to provide your students access to distance learning. 

 

I hope others find this resource useful with implementing video conferencing in the classroom.

 

 

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Educational Leadership:For Each to Excel:Preparing Students to Learn Without Us

Educational Leadership:For Each to Excel:Preparing Students to Learn Without Us | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

In this era of access, personalizing learning means allowing students to choose their own paths through the curriculum. For schools and teachers, it means connecting our expectations to students' passions and interests as learners. That is both a challenge and an opportunity for educators...


Via Beth Dichter
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

By pairing personalized learning and technology, a teacher can help students learn what they need to learn through the topics that interest them most.

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Educational Leadership:Teaching with Mobile Tech: How to Transform Teaching with Tablets

Educational Leadership:Teaching with Mobile Tech: How to Transform Teaching with Tablets | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

If your school is investing in tablets, be sure to have a plan for how learning should change.

During one of our first visits to an iPad school, students told us that their favorite use of the tablet was for note taking. They had an app that enabled them to leave their paper notebooks at home and organize their notes in one place.

 

We're not opposed to gains in productivity, but if all tablet computers do is replace notebooks with notebook apps, we're unlikely to look back on the United States' investment in tablets with much enthusiasm.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Tablets

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

I scooped this article because I am currently working with a school that is in the beginning stages of implementing ipads.

 

 

 

Gust MEES's curator insight, June 3, 2015 1:27 PM

If your school is investing in tablets, be sure to have a plan for how learning should change.

During one of our first visits to an iPad school, students told us that their favorite use of the tablet was for note taking. They had an app that enabled them to leave their paper notebooks at home and organize their notes in one place.


We're not opposed to gains in productivity, but if all tablet computers do is replace notebooks with notebook apps, we're unlikely to look back on the United States' investment in tablets with much enthusiasm.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Tablets


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/


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Life of an Educator: The types of leaders we need in education...

Life of an Educator: The types of leaders we need in education... | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Standing up for one's vision and beliefs is definitely a leadership trait and one that is worthy of all educators.  Using communication skills to get your points across are very important if you want to keep leading.  It may be scary but it is necessary.

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Leading Blog: A Leadership Blog: 4 Keys to Finding Hidden Leaders in Your Organization

Leading Blog: A Leadership Blog: 4 Keys to Finding Hidden Leaders in Your Organization | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Article on how hidden leaders display four key identifiers: they demonstrate integrity, lead through relationships, focus on results, and remain customer-focused no matter what role they have in the organization.

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Educational Leadership:Feedback for Learning:Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

Educational Leadership:Feedback for Learning:Seven Keys to Effective Feedback | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Research has revealed that feedback is among the most powerful influences on student achievement.  Feedback is something I did extensive research on in my Visible Learning paper for EDL 773.

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, June 26, 2015 8:55 PM

I would like to read this article about educational leadership and effective feedback 

Rescooped by Jennifer McGuff from EDL 773
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Ten Steps to Choosing Digital Curricula for Blended Learning - DreamBox Learning

Ten Steps to Choosing Digital Curricula for Blended Learning - DreamBox Learning | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Blended learning is the foremost trend in education – in fact, the 2011-2012 investment in IT for kindergarten through Grade 12 public education to support it was an estimated $9.7 billion, according to the Center for Digital Education. As the…Read more ›

Via Edith Irizarry, Luciana Viter, THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

I learned a lot about the teacher's role in blended learning.  

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 18, 2015 1:04 PM

I liked the fact that this article discussed different goals when implementing blended learning and what role the teachers plays in the process.   

Vikki Coleman's curator insight, August 17, 2016 10:20 AM

I chose this because it is a good resource for those considering a blended learning curriculum.


I believe others will benefit from the questions and answers provided when determining to use blended learning.

Rescooped by Jennifer McGuff from EDL 773
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New Teacher Academy: Classroom Management | Edutopia

New Teacher Academy: Classroom Management | Edutopia | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Blogger Lisa Dabbs introduces the New Teacher Academy with help from Justin Stortz, who discusses the not-so-secret basics of classroom management.


Via Angela DesBarres, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Teachers need at tool bag with resources specifically with classroom management. 

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 18, 2015 12:46 PM

Teachers need at tool bag with resources specifically with classroom management. 

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Colorado elementary school kitchen manager fired for giving free lunch to students without money

Colorado elementary school kitchen manager fired for giving free lunch to students without money | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
The elementary school kitchen manager admitted to giving students free lunch when they didn't have any money, even if they weren't signed up for the free lunch program.

Via Velvet Martin, Ben Bempong, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

I remember reading about this situation in the news.  How do we provide food for students who don't qualify for free and reduced lunch?  Especially when we are asking students to perform academically.    

Ben Bempong's curator insight, July 20, 2015 7:28 PM

This is ridiculous.  This is something that is passionate to me.  As educators we do a lot of complaining about students grades being low, and academic levels being low and we wonder why.  Some kids come to school and they are not able to learn because they did not have any meal the night before.  Maybe no meals, maybe no love, maybe no care.  When kids have other essential needs on their mind, the last thing they are thinking about is learning.  If I was the Kitchen manager, I would of done the same thing most likely.

Jason Smith's curator insight, July 20, 2015 8:01 PM

Too bad, great intentions.

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 22, 2015 4:43 PM

This is very interesting, I totally understand that documentation is needed for billing and tracking purposes. However, what do you do with a hungry student that you are asking to perform academically?   

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10 Tough Truths about Your First Year of Teaching

10 Tough Truths about Your First Year of Teaching | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Too often, young teachers are blinded by their own expectations or those that others have for them. When reality doesn’t meet them, they end up feeling very much alone.

The fact is that the first year of teaching is often as challenging as it is rewarding. Inexperienced teachers face dilemmas that no one prepares them for. Here are a few realities that my teacher friends shared that day.


Via Patti Kinney, Bradley Gomoluch
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Great article on new teacher's experiences and thoughts on new teacher induction. 

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 31, 2015 3:15 PM

Good article and it makes a connection to the research we have just done investigating teacher induction models. 

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Research: Dispelling 9 common myths on how to improve student achievement

Research: Dispelling 9 common myths on how to improve student achievement | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

According to Dr. John Hattie, a professor and researcher at Melbourne's Graduate School of Education, research and detailed statistical examination can determine which teaching methods actually improve student achievement..


Via Becky Roehrs, Rebecca Wilkins
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Hattie's meta-analysis of 15 years of research revealed 9 myths regarding factors that increase student achievement.  

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, June 4, 2015 7:56 PM

The latest trends often don't make a difference like we're led to believe. Smaller classrooms? Homework in k-6? No critical feedback?

Rebecca Wilkins's curator insight, June 27, 2015 10:11 AM

Hattie's meta-analysis of 15 years of research revealed 9 myths regarding factors that increase student achievement.  Some of these are unpopular with teachers, like reducing class size, but using the effect size criteria of more than 1 year of growth in a year reveals practices we need to abandon.

Jason Smith's curator insight, July 18, 2015 12:14 PM

Interesting facts and myths that may surprise you

Rescooped by Jennifer McGuff from Leading Schools
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John Hattie’s Eight Mind Frames For Teachers ~ Visible Learning

John Hattie’s Eight Mind Frames For Teachers ~ Visible Learning | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
During the summer holidays we stumbled upon a great video made by Cheryl Reynolds, a senior lecturer at the University of Huddersfield. She has put together John Hattie’s eight mind frames in a very nice and fun video scribe animation. This is a great back-to-school inspiration for all teachers who want to know and improve their impact on student learning. Watch the video and spread the message!

Via Jim Lerman, Mel Riddile
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

We have gone through a professional development regarding John Hattie and Visible Learning.  This is a fun and entertaining video about John Hattie's eight mind frames for teachers.  

Amy in ATL's curator insight, February 6, 2015 8:02 PM

A good review. Even if it is in the middle of the school year. Enjoy these scribble-scrib animations.

 

Rescooped by Jennifer McGuff from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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21 Things 4 Students: Keeping Them Engaged

21 Things 4 Students:  Keeping Them Engaged | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Wow!    

 

The 21things4students.net project is supported by a grant from the REMC Association of Michigan and maintained by a team from three Intermediate School Districts in Michigan (Shiawassee, Ingham, and Macomb). It was created as an educational and online resource to help students improve their technology proficiency as they prepare for success in the 21st century. This project was specifically developed to provide districts and classroom teachers with resources to help students meet or exceed the 8th grade technology proficiency requirements in Michigan. The development of this resource came at the request of teachers using the initial 21things4teachers.net  site.


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

An educational and online resource to help students improve their technology proficiency as they prepare for success in the 21st century.  Really great information in my job as a Teacher Consultant.

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Rescooped by Jennifer McGuff from Digital Delights
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Educational Leadership:Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age

Educational Leadership:Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

I chose this article because it deals with issues of digital citizenship and specific issues (like cyberbullying, sexting, safety and security) that should addressed in a digital citizenship curriculum.

 

 

Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, January 19, 2014 12:36 AM
Issues of Digital Citizenship

 

"Here are just a few of the issues that a comprehensive digital citizenship curriculum should address.

 

 

Balance. Understanding past, present, and possible future effects of technology. Cultivating a sense of balance that considers opportunity as well as responsibility, empowerment as well as caution, personal fulfillment as well as community and global well-being.

 

 

Safety and security. Understanding how online actions might lead to harm to yourself or others. Includes protecting your own privacy, respecting that of others, and recognizing inappropriate online communications and sites (such as sexual material and other resources intended for adults).

 

 

Cyberbullying. Understanding the potentially devastating effects of cyberbullying and how it violates ethical principles of personal integrity, compassion, and responsible behavior.

 

 

Sexting. Understanding the negative consequences of using a cell phone to take and transmit pictures of a sexual nature of oneself or others.

 

 

Copyright and plagiarism. Respecting others' intellectual property rights and reflecting on the legality and ethics of using online materials without permission (a complex and murky area of the law, bounded by "fair use" guidelines)."

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 19, 2014 7:31 AM

Great one thanks for sharing.

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Schools Failing Students by not Teaching Failure - Tech Cocktail

Schools Failing Students by not Teaching Failure - Tech Cocktail | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Most students grow up thinking failure in school is tantamount to failure in life. Schools failing students has to be fixed by actually teaching failure.

Via Dean J. Fusto
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Standardized tests do not simulate real life and very often are not connected to the real demands of the workplace. Teaching needs to go beyond failing students and instead raise motivated learners who will make a difference in the world by solving real world problems.

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Rescooped by Jennifer McGuff from Educational Technology News
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Using Technology to Improve how the Brain Learns

Using Technology to Improve how the Brain Learns | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"We’ve Only Just Begun to Explore the Ways in Which Technology can be Used to Improve How we all Learn. It is common knowledge that an array of technological advancements have made many medical miracles"


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Information on the possibilities for information or ‘computer’ technologies to be leveraged to help the mind grow and enhance learning, Really interesting.

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Rescooped by Jennifer McGuff from Educational Leadership in the 21st century
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The Secret Source of Great Leadership

The Secret Source of Great Leadership | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
What's the origin of the best leadership traits? Intelligence? A supportive environment? A degree from the right school? It's as close as your heart.

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
Jennifer McGuffs insight:

Information on the best leadership traits.  

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