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Vision: It's a verb!

Vision: It's a verb! | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Noun or verb
What often gets in the way of vision being a tool for guiding others toward the future is its treatment as a noun — a thing. Frequently, leaders create a vision, crossing it off their lists like too many other "one-and-done" activities. The words are printed on posters or mugs and that’s the end of the discussion, except perhaps for a little lip service. And, as a result, the vision offers little value to individuals or the organization.

But leaders who use vision as a verb see very different results. Verbs are action words, and when vision becomes a vibrant, living activity, tremendous benefits are possible. Visioning can:

Facilitate greater alignment throughout levels of the organization
Focus attention on what’s most important given the plethora of competing priorities facing most employees
Guide independent decision making (which becomes increasingly important as typical spans of control increase)
Create an emotional connection with the organization that supports enhanced engagement and retention.
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digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
Curated by Don Dea
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How to Pick the Right Problem

How to Pick the Right Problem | digitalNow | Scoop.it
When you create new value propositions and growth you need to focus on high-value customer jobs. These are not necessarily the most important jobs from your customers’ perspective. They are the most promising jobs from your perspective as a solutions provider.High-value customer jobs are characterized by the following, they are:

Important: When customer’s success or failure to get the job done leads to essential gains or extreme pains, respectively. Examples are managing the security risk of an ecommerce website, or designing and implementing the strategy at a company.
Tangible: When the pains or gains related to a job can be felt or experienced immediately or often. Examples are traffic during your daily commute, or managing a constantly overflowing email inbox.
Unsatisfied: When current value propositions don’t help to relieve pains or create desired gains in a satisfying way. Maybe the desired value proposition doesn’t even exist. Examples are the inexistent cure for hangovers, or calorie-free chocolate.
Lucrative: When many people have the job with related pains and gains or when a small number of customers are willing to pay a premium. An example of the former is listening to music on the go. An example of the latter are rare diseases for which customers or insurers are willing to pay a premium.
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Organizational Agility Requires Psychologically Safe Teams 

Psychological safety is fundamental to effective agile decision making and successful innovation for several reasons. Both agility and innovation rely on (1) an accurate and collective understanding of internal and external conditions, (2) open and objective consideration of diverse perspectives to reduce the now universal risk of volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous situations, and (3) an acceptance that sometimes the best path forward in uncertainty is to make a decision knowing that it might not work out. In other words, it has to be safe to be wrong, make mistakes, and learn. This is only possible where open objective dialogue occurs and members feel safe in the knowledge that they will not be ostracised for dissenting opinions or taking actions that ultimately prove problematic.

In contrast, whether due to narrow-minded or arrogant leaders at one end of the spectrum or impossible cultural norms that try to ensure that no one ever feels hurt, questioned, or challenged at the other end of the spectrum, psychologically unsafe environments undermine progress. At their worst, people fear for their job when they speak out and thus at best self-edit what they say and at worst avoid raising critical issues at all. The trendy imperative to insist “culture über alles” (“culture overall”), compels employees to conform to cultural norms at the expense of substance in an effort to not be seen as difficult. Being liked and welcomed are more important than either near-term results or long-term learning. Contractors almost universally edit their commentary to reduce the risk of not getting renewed. As a result, potential risks are not raised, good ideas not shared, and projects with known shortcomings are endorsed or worse still not killed off long past reasonable certainty they should be.

Google and the U.S. Military have done extensive research on what makes for effective teams and operational units. Contrary to the hype about self-organizing self-directed teams, effective teams have leaders. In some cases they are formal. In others they are emergent. But in all cases these leaders have specific characteristics. One of the most important characteristics is that in addition to being clearly committed to the team’s success, they seek out and consider diverse thinking and views. Often engaging in open and challenging discussions about opinions that differ from their own. Importantly they do so open-mindedly and fully prepared to be convinced that an alternate perspective is superior to the one they started with.

The modern trends of contractors over employees, open plan offices, hot desking, continually temporary assignments, self-managed or self-organized teams, avoidance of direct and meaningful feedback when it is critical, and short employment periods are all contrary to the formation of psychologically safe teams as well as the true acceptance of diversity. The benefits of diversity for an organization are not derived through the cosmetic process of recruiting individuals with diverse origin stories. Few benefits are gained if diverse recruits simply compete to conform to a corporate culture by suppressing dissenting or challenging opinions. The benefits of diversity are derived when those with different views generate reasoned open consideration of diverse perspectives without fear of offense, social ostracism, or diminished chance of promotion.

To be effectively agile organizations must learn from experience, manifest practiced objectivity, be open to challenging engagement, and have accountability as cultural norms and organizational priorities. This is not possible if people are labelled difficult, looked over for promotion, or marginalized if they put the truth ahead of obsequies civility. Nor can it occur when being called out for making a mistake is so accompanied by implied trauma that embarrassment and withdrawal are implied expectations. When getting called out for mistakes is (1) the norm, (2) the focus is on cause, effect, and what can be done to improve the outcome next time, and (3) no one fears a loss of status or belonging as a result of critical feedback, no one thinks twice about giving or receiving it. Instead, they think about the lessons to be learned and the steps to be taken to apply or assimilate the solution. The best way to make accountability, objectivity, learning, and psychological safety the defining cultural norms is to confer status exclusively on those that identify, apply, and share lessons. When this is the case, constructive criticism, even from juniors directed at the most senior levels, becomes a powerful ally for all leaders. Such cultural norms are also the best way to achieve consistent innovation success and organizational agility.

For more details on useful tools and methods, a better understanding of consumer decision making, innovation success, how to remove bias from internal decision processes, craft more effective and safer incentive programs and strategies, or for more details on the science of Motivational Drive Theory, (1) read A Deeper Truth: The new science of innovation, human choice, and societal scale behavior (2) sign up and read other installments of Tim Stroh’s Value In 60 Seconds or Under 3 Minutes email and blog, or (3) if you would like assistance make contact to arrange a discussion, workshops, keynote presentation, or services engagement via LinkedIn (http://linkedin.com/in/timstroh) or tim@strohinternational.com.
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How to build effective strategy even in constant change 

good strategies manifest several key characteristics. They are:

easily understood and explained
provide sufficient detail regarding a key purpose to provide clear prioritization and guidance but are not so detailed as to restrict how teams and leaders with distributed authority choose to execute
are a useful tool in decision making and resource allocation in all specific areas of activity conducted by an organization
make self-evident or intuitive what a stakeholder should not do as well as what they should do
allow for arena specific strategies to be defined that are universally aligned with the overall higher level or organizational strategy
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 In the Absence of Clarity There is No Accountability

A leader’s number one job is to create clarity in their organization. Lack of clarity leads to lack of accountability and ultimately frustration and conflict.

As much as we’d like to think we aren’t, humans are animals. Social animals. In the wild social animals are led by an alpha who provides guidance (usually in the form of violence) on what is acceptable behavior in the pack.

Animals also have no capacity to process language so all of their clues about what is acceptable and how to be accountable come from the alpha’s behavior.

When an alpha (in the wild or in business) is unclear about the behavior that is acceptable and/or the consequences for not showing the right behaviors, the animals in their group will demonstrate the behaviors that they believe the alpha wants. If the alpha doesn’t punish or correct those behaviors, their group members will continue doing those activities until their alpha erupts with frustration, which they caused.

With humans, our team members filter the behaviors they believe their leader wants from them through the filter of their hopes, dreams, fears, and comfort zone. A recurring theme in my coaching sessions with the leaders I work with is “why aren’t my people doing (behavior expected)?!” The answer is usually “because they didn’t know you wanted them to do that and that behavior is outside their current comfort zone.”
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Reasons You’re Not Thinking Clearly

You’re in the dark. The first step in changing any habit is recognizing that you have it. This is harder than it seems with clarity since it lies in that middle of what’s being communicated and what’s being received. I might think an idea is perfectly clear but fail to get it across to you. You, in turn, may think you understand something but don’t. Communication and repeating back your understanding is key.

You lack curiosity. “Why?” is the most frequent question children ask and reflects our innate desire to know. But as we grow up, our curiosity is drummed out. This is a shame. Curiosity pushes us to try things people say we can’t accomplish or to differentiate between two options. Fortunately, organizations are filled with people with dormant curiosity waiting to be sparked. With a bit of coaxing and the cultivation of a welcoming culture, they can reinvigorate this curiosity where questions are both encouraged and rewarded.

You think you know it all. Many leaders think they know, but they don’t, and they aren’t going to ask. Their hubris gets in the way and keeps them from seeing the full picture. Fortunately, mindsets are malleable. People can overcome their hubris and adopt a growth mindset with reflection, coaching, and some work on the self. They can choose to let go of their belief that they know everything and start asking more curiosity-driven questions of more people.
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The science behind why people buy 

The science behind why people buy  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Scratching your head over how to improve conversion and product sales? Christie Chew of Adobe outlines how science principles can be applied to improve the online shopping experience.
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8 Steps to Jumpstarting a Truth-telling Workplace Culture

Why? People don’t feel safe telling the truth because they don’t think it is smart or safe to do so. Many leaders believe that to be effective and successful, they need to be smarter than the next guy, fight for their area of the business, and not show vulnerability. This mentality creates a lack of trust, collaboration, and common ownership for a greater goal—and ultimately greatly slows down execution speed.
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Nicky Stephen's curator insight, January 10, 6:05 AM
Really good point well made.
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Blockchain’s weakest links

The reliability of ‘private’ blockchains
The term “blockchain” lacks a common definition. Many confuse blockchain—a decentralized, distributed-ledger technology—with cryptocurrencies or other accounting systems. But Bitcoin is one of some 1,600 digital currencies and tokens. It runs on a blockchain system, and users receive bitcoins as rewards for doing work on the system. This is the most mature application of blockchain, and the one with which many companies and investors are most familiar.
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Lead Innovators, Don’t Manage Innovation 

. Everyone seems to have a different definition of innovation. Be sure you are leading people who have the same understanding and objectives.

2. Managing innovation implies that the core competence of an innovative enterprise is their system or culture. While that is important, successful innovation comes from living, breathing humans who innovate or try to repeatedly despite big obstacles.

3. Managing is about optimizing the efficacy and efficiency or resources. Entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs, some of whom are innovators, pursue opportunity with limited resources with the goal of creating user defined value through the deployment of innovation.

4. Leaderpreneurs are different than managers and have a different role. They provide vision, direction and inspiration.

5. Managing is about preserving or building the status quo. Innovating is about making the status quo obsolete.
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Innovation Isn’t About What You Know, But What You Don’t – Innovation Excellence

Innovation Isn’t About What You Know, But What You Don’t – Innovation Excellence | digitalNow | Scoop.it
If you went to an investor and said you wanted to start a business but did not have any idea about the technology, the customer or the competitive environment, you probably wouldn’t get very far. Nevertheless, that’s exactly how every business starts. You have some assumptions, many of which will be proven wrong and you will have to adapt.

One of my favorite stories that I came across while I was researching my book, Mapping Innovation, was that of Elance. It started out as a matchmaker between firms and freelancers. It failed. Then it pivoted to become a pioneer in vendor management software and had some success. It sold that business and went back to the original idea, but incorporated what it had learned about vendor management and hit upon a viable model.
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Impact Blindness

Impact Blindness: “Many organizations lack mechanisms to identify, measure, and manage the demands that initiatives place on the managers and employees who are expected to do the work.”
Multiplier Effects: “Because functions and units often set their priorities and launch initiatives in isolation, they may not understand the impact on neighboring functions and units.”
Political Logrolling: “I will support your initiatives if you support mine.”
Unfunded Mandates: “Executive teams often task their organizations with meeting important goals without giving managers and their teams the necessary resources to accomplish them.”
Band-Aid Initiatives: “When projects are launched to provide limited fixes to significant problems, the result can be a proliferation of initiatives, none of which may adequately deal with root causes.”
Cost Myopia: “Another partial fix that can exacerbate overload is cutting people without cutting the related work.”
Initiative Inertia: “Companies often lack the means (and the will) to stop existing initiatives. Sometimes that’s because they have no ‘sunset’ process for determining when to close things down.”
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Would You Know How To Survive a Cultural Earthquake? 

Team goals must be crystal clear and fully aligned
Everyone on the team must agree on where the team is headed and what everyone is working towards.

2. Team strategies must be consistent
If one part of the organization is pulling left while another part is pulling right, the team won’t get anywhere.
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Strategy

Strategy | digitalNow | Scoop.it
“Strategies fail from within,” according to Porter. The entire notion of traditional strategy, one that rigorously assesses unique choices on both the supply and demand side, collapses in many organizations. No strategy means no direction, a plight that accidentally snowballs the number of initiatives a company takes on. “The essence of strategy is about choices,
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How to build effective strategy even in constant change 

What Makes a Winning Strategy
A strategy is not a plan. A strategy is a statement of intent with very specific properties. To qualify as a strategy, the statement must describe a focus for activity and an implicit or explicit set of conditions for an end state that, when successfully executed, guarantee the organization will achieve its desired goals. Good strategies ensure that the goal will be achieved irrespective of any reasonably foreseeable competitive activity or probable change to an arena activity. A well-crafted strategy, successfully executed, will guarantee a desired outcome irrespective of anything but a black swan event completely outside the scope of even robust scenario planning.

In addition, when expressed, all good strategies manifest several key characteristics. They are:

easily understood and explained
provide sufficient detail regarding a key purpose to provide clear prioritization and guidance but are not so detailed as to restrict how teams and leaders with distributed authority choose to execute
are a useful tool in decision making and resource allocation in all specific areas of activity conducted by an organization
make self-evident or intuitive what a stakeholder should not do as well as what they should do
allow for arena specific strategies to be defined that are universally aligned with the overall higher level or organizational strategy
Often when I put forward this definition, people balk at the notion that an outcome can be “guaranteed”. They then become positively disparaging when they see “irrespective of competitive activity…or changes to a market.” But great strategies, and there are many examples throughout both military and business history, have always satisfied this definition. While black swan events and poor execution can always lead to failure, the goal of anyone crafting a strategy, at any level, should be the simplest expression of a method paired with an achievable end state or directed purpose that will guarantee success.

Examples of Winning Strategies
Let’s look at some examples, one from geopolitical history and several commercial examples. First, the Allied strategy of WWII. This was simple and clear; “Self-preservation. Starve the enemies war machine.” This strategy meets all of the criteria of our definition. Despite setbacks, problems with execution, and fierce competitive activity, by the end of the war, the average Allied soldier had 2 tons of supply accessible to them or on the way in the supply chain. The average Axis soldier had less than 2 kilos. Victory for the Allies had been made inevitable long before hostilities ended. It’s just that neither side realized. Despite changing conditions during the war, this strategy did not change while arena specific plans changed or were adapted regularly.
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Organizational Pathways to Business Model Innovation 

Organizational Pathways to Business Model Innovation  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Pathways to business model discovery and validation

For the following discussion, let’s delineate the business model innovation process into three generic steps: Discovery – Validation – Scaling. As general guiding principle in the discovery and validation phase, Marcel Bogers et al. advise to not settle too quickly on organizational structure of emerging business models. They write:

The lesson for any organization wanting to explore new business models is to not settle too quickly on a structure for the new business. In fact, the organizational structure can more usefully be thought of as one of the essential building blocks of the business model – that is, as an aspect of the new business that needs to be fully explored and experimented with before you can learn what works best.  […]

The business model canvas framework developed by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur has become a very popular way to understand the potential building blocks of business models. […] However, organizational designs and the associated organizational tensions that emerge during the process of business model exploration are not well addressed by the existing tools. Companies exploring new business models may not fully recognize that these tensions will almost inevitably emerge and thus may be ill-prepared to manage them. Understanding these tensions should help in managing the challenges of concurrent business models.

Avoiding quick settlement on structure being one of those key areas of tension to be managed, two others have become apparent aside:

Balance top management support and experimentation
Power struggle for resources (with existing business model)
To provide the required space, time and support for proper business model exploration, Saul Kaplan has insistently stressed the setup of dedicated Sandboxes – with direct sponsorship of the CEO – as being imperative.
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3 trends driving the Second Golden Age of Martech: ecosystems, experts, and (citizen) engineers 

3 trends driving the Second Golden Age of Martech: ecosystems, experts, and (citizen) engineers  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
There are three trends that are changing the nature of martech. They will catalyze the end of the “first golden age of martech” and lay the foundation for a second golden age that will be much larger, but likely look quite different.

Ecosystems — instead of marketing cloud suites vs. best-of-breed point solutions, we will have the best of both: open platforms that serve as stable foundations, augmented by large ecosystems of specialized third-party apps that are more deeply integrated.
Experts — the lines between software vendors and professional services firms will blur: software companies will offer more expert services; services firms will automate and bottle their expertise in code.
(Citizen) Engineers — in a digital world where every company asymptotically becomes a “software business,” organizations will extend commerical platforms with customized customer experience apps and business process logic, many via “citizen developers.”
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 Great Leaders Do

1. Talk straight and save the spin

Employees want to know what’s happening and why, in a direct way. Don’t be evasive or try to “spin” messages to employees. Tell them what you know – and what you don’t know – as soon as you know it. Chances are, you may be waiting too long after getting key information to communicate it and that’s when employees fill the void with their own meaning.

2. Spell out your expectations

People rise to the expectations set for them. Many problems in business are caused by employees not understanding what their employers need and what their bosses expect of them. Great bosses have codified and discussed with employees what they can expect from their boss, and in turn, what the boss expects of them. Great bosses have ongoing conversations with their employees about whether expectations are being met, and/or to clarify expectations.

3. Listen and invite feedback

Employees are more likely to support what they help to create. Enhance the dialogue by asking for input, genuinely seeking employees’ questions and perspective. You’re likely to learn something important when you focus on real, two-way conversations.
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How technology will redefine workplace experiences 

It’s time to change the way work gets done in the enterprise, if we want to stay ahead. The workforce of the future expects organizations to use new technologies that improve communication, workflow and ideation.
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Maximize Your Growth Potential by Supercharging Your Learning Agility

Maximize Your Growth Potential by Supercharging Your Learning Agility | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The first step is to identify the different types of learning you should focus on. The ones that are most beneficial to today’s companies are as follows:

Continuous Improvement: Learning how to avoid making the same mistakes twice
Course Correcting: Figuring out how to get plans back on track as quickly as possible
Capability Building: Developing new company skills and competencies needed for growth 
Employee Development: Tapping into the full potential of your most important resource
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thoughtLEADERS, LLC: Leadership Training for the Real World » How to Figure Out Where You Should Focus

thoughtLEADERS, LLC: Leadership Training for the Real World » How to Figure Out Where You Should Focus | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Spotlight on two key factors

Theories on motivation stress that a great goal should be desirable and feasible – both at the same time. A business opportunity is just the same: it should be highly desirable, i.e., offer a high potential for value creation, yet also highly feasible, i.e., bear limited challenges in capturing this value. So when you assess different opportunities for your company, make sure to evaluate these two key factors. Your aim is to focus on a high potential, low challenge opportunity.
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What CEOs Can Learn from University Presidents

What CEOs Can Learn from University Presidents | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Universities are often a microcosm of the larger societal trends and issues. Handling those tensions and dynamics equips one with a unique understanding of what the future holds. In other words, university presidents are operating in the future — which may seem counterintuitive given the widespread portrayal of university leaders as risk-averse traditionalists. The truth is that they are in touch with and shaping our future workers, leaders, and consumers as well as the environment that all our organizations and companies will be functioning in. The insights of university presidents into the emerging workforce — and the next generation of leaders — are invaluable for the business sector.
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Four Pathways to Innovation

Solve a problem that you already face:
This is the easiest way to innovation. In the course of going through our days, we come across many things that frustrate or anger us. Processes that only add more bureaucracy, tools that don’t work the way they are expected to work and many more. A process or tool that reduces the productivity of our employees, customers or partners. These are all around us if we look at them. We can start from there.

Everyone in an organization should be expected to look and callout these problems and solve them (if it is possible to solve it by themselves). If not, we should maintain a list of such problems that everyone in the organization can access and the same should be continuously monitored by the leaders.

The problem at the top of this list should always be addressed as quickly and decisively as possible. This does two things. It helps in increasing the overall productivity levels within the organization and also sends a message to the entire organization that innovation is an ongoing process and the leaders within the organization take it seriously and so should everyone else.
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Blockchain’s weakest links

Blockchain’s weakest links | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The regulatory outlook for all blockchain systems and cryptocurrencies is highly uncertain. A half dozen regulators in the United States, as well as their counterparts overseas, have issued a series of often contradictory announcements and enforcement actions that touch blockchain companies issuing tokens or operating a cryptocurrency exchange. The regulators don’t agree on whether cryptocurrencies should be legally considered commodities, currencies, or securities, which affects what rules cryptocurrency holders and issuers need to follow. 
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New study: Culture, not technology, determines digital transformation success

CEOs must assume the role of ‘chief evangelist’ of digital transformation to persuasively, persistently and convincingly articulate and communicate the “why” behind each initiative and champion changes, to create positive business impacts.

Digital transformation only succeeds if it’s rooted in behavioral change

The study identified that teams will only embrace change if they understand why transformation is needed and if they have faith in their leaders.

Interestingly, 100% of C-suite level executives agreed that digitalization is the “new normal”, with a universal belief that embracing digital transformation was urgent and critical for the organization to survive and thrive.

Furthermore, 80% of C-Suite interviews highlighted the importance of purposefully focusing on ‘people aspects’ during digital transformation journeys, suggesting an emphasis on the importance of inclusiveness.

“Readiness” was perceived to transcend well beyond technological readiness into the realm of organizational culture, new mindsets and leader behaviors. The “readier” the organization was perceived to be for digital transformation, the greater the need was felt for cultural change and for embracing conducive leadership behaviors.

Open, flexible and agile organizations are better able to innovate

Each transformation journey is unique, but the research suggests common cultural attributes for those who are successful – openness, flexibility and agility. Today’s winners are focused on incremental change, flatter structures and experimentation. 71% of mid-level respondents acknowledged that they needed to adopt new leadership behaviors including agility, risk-taking, accountability, leading change and digital adoption.

The creation of small, agile, nimble-footed teams that are highly empowered to drive digital transformation, as opposed to making large-scale enterprise-wide changes that could be intimidating for employees, is a preferred implementation tactic. However, only 41% of those surveyed believed they had the skills that are necessary for the digital age, suggesting there is a pressing need to increase access to training to plug the ever-present skills gap.


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The Big Lies of Strategy 

The Big Lies of Strategy  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
I have come to the conclusion that strategy is actually about a set of five choices that must be made:

1. What is our winning aspiration?
2. Where will we play?
3. How will we win?
4. What capabilities must be in place?
5. What management systems are required?
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