Digital Evolution of Schooling
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Digital Evolution of Schooling
The Digital Revolution has had a profound impact upon the world, particularly its lives, learning and work, over the last twenty plus years. Globally the digital has transformed the nature of virtually all organisations, transforming analogue operations into digital. A major exception has been within schooling. While there are pathfinding schools globally that have transformed their workings as well as any of the digital master’s in business they remain the exception. As Lee and Broadie document in Digitally Connected Families: And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016 most schools remain Industrial Age organisations, leaving it largely to the digitally connected families of the world to lead the children’s learning with the digital, from birth.That said there are schools globally striving to go digital, to emulate the achievements of the pathfinding schools and genuinely collaborate with their families in providing a 24/7/365 mode of schooling that will go a long way to educating the young for a digital and socially connected world. This curation is designed to assist the digital evolution of those schools, and help overcome the very considerable challenges to be met to achieve whole school digital normalisation.
Curated by Mal Lee
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The Traditional Features of Schooling | The Digital Evolution of Schooling

The Traditional Features of Schooling | The Digital Evolution of Schooling | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Mal Lee and Roger Broadie Most schools worldwide today have the same core features as those in the 1960’s, with many the same as schools in the late nineteenth century. In examining the history of schooling over the last century, and particularly since the shock of Sputnik in 1957, and reflecting on our own sixty years’ plus experience with school change and innovation one must conclude that the core features of schooling have not changed. There is moreover scant suggestion that they are about to, with few if any governments contemplating the kind of digital transformation seen in business and other public-sector organisations.  It is a reality that needs to be better understood if schooling is to have any hope of evolving at pace with societal change and providing an education relevant to the digitally connected young. It is appreciated that many visionary and highly committed governments, public benefactors, educators and schools globally have made concerted efforts to innovate and enhance the holistic education of all children in the last century, particularly since Russia put a satellite into orbit.  Many will remember the immense investment in model schools, the Dewey based progressive schools, educational television, reticulated video, computer aided instruction, open plan schools, alternate schools, school based curriculum design, the many national innovation programs, future and lighthouse schools, and more recently all manner of digital technologies and STEM. History affirms that invariably the dents made in the traditional form of the school have been ‘rectified’ and the school/s returned to the old ways.   Schooling globally is still conducted within the physical walls of the place called school, within specified times and dates, with solitary teachers teaching class groups, invariably behind closed doors. The teachers still invariably teach the curriculum determined by the authorities, in the manner prescribed, following a structured, linear teacher controlled instructional program, continually measuring, and reporting upon student performance, always comparing the student attainment, from the early childhood years onwards.  The assessment continues be of sole performance, never the ability to work with or to relate to others. The students still move in a lock step manner through their schooling, moving as age cohorts, from one year to the next over twelve, thirteen years to graduation – the decision makers understanding that a significant part of the age cohort, identified by the academic criteria as of lesser quality, will ‘drop out’ before the final exams. The schools remain strongly hierarchical, linear Industrial Age organisations, obliged to follow the dictates of government, whether state or independent. The head, often with the support of a small executive continues to decide on the workings of the school. Most teachers and support staff continue to be disempowered, obliged to do as told, closely micromanaged by both the school and government authorities, expected to conform with the national standards and mores.  In many situations, particularly in the rural areas the students attend the same schools as their parents, the schools often being over a hundred years old. The students remain at the bottom of the pecking order, invariably distrusted, obliged every minute of the school day to do as every adult instructs, with their every movement controlled and monitored, fearful that any transgression will be punished. They invariably have no say in what is taught or assessed, when, where or how, and as such have little or no influence or control over the in-school education. The experts know what is best. Student alienation with schooling remains high and likely growing globally, particularly among the non- tertiary bound, with recent student Gallup polls revealing in developed nations like the US 50% student disengagement with the schooling (Gallup, 2015). The contrast with how the young learn with the digital outside the school globally is increasingly marked. Outside the digitally connected young have since the mid 90’s been trusted, empowered, and provided the tools, freedom and support to take charge of their learning with the digital 24/7/365, anywhere, anytime. They, and not the authorities decide what they want to learn, when, how and where (Lee and Broadie, 2018).  Schooling is still characterised by its constancy, continuity, sameness, paper base and adversity to risk, with schools, year after year, decade after decade following a remarkably similar calendar, running the same events, using the same livery and ceremonies. Heads and teachers move on or retire, replaced by colleagues who invariably continue the routine.  It is understood most systems structurally have added a year or two to the schooling but the nature of the schooling in the added years remains basically the same. The increasingly greater monies spent by governments from the 1960s in the supposed quest for school change and enhancement brought no sustained change to the traditional form of schooling – for many good reasons. Society relies on schools minding the young while the parent/s work, and keeping the unemployment figures down with the older students.  This is ever more so with both parents working, and governments globally having to contend with structural changes in the job market.  Term dates largely determine the family year everywhere. Any variation to those dates or the school hours is guaranteed to generate all manner of flak and disruption.  Society expects the schools to manage and control the nation’s young, and ready them to be largely compliant members of society. School exist to inculcate the young on the nation’s ordered ways, with ‘revolutionary’, non-conformist activity invariably repressed and/or criticised by the media. They are the organisation society has given a monopoly to decide on who will be the future leaders and who the workers, and to ensure that sorting is reflected in the qualifications provided. One will struggle to a find a nation today where the final school exams don’t complete 12/13 years of sorting and sifting, with those in authority and the media lauding the ‘successful’ students, and largely dismissing those who don’t succeed academically. While that observation might appear harsh success at school is still adjudged, as it has for a hundred plus years by performance in academic, paper based exams. Tellingly the schools that go digital will not only not markedly improve their ability to meet any of the above-mentioned givens, but will open the doors to on-going digital disruption and evolution, and a shift away from many aspects of traditional schooling. With its continued existence guaranteed, schooling is one of the rare ‘industries’ today that doesn’t have to worry unduly about productivity, efficiency, continued viability or the workers being ‘restructured’. Indeed, in most situations they currently don’t, unlike business, need to address ‘digital Darwinism’ (Solis and Szymanski, 2016) or the very considerable challenge of digital transformation. Globally political parties still pander to the parent self-interest, and campaign successfully on the promise of spending more on dated, inefficient, inflexible schools and processes, fully aware the extra monies spent on the likes of smaller classes won’t enhance student attainment, educational relevance, school efficiency or productivity. There is moreover little or no pressure for schools and their heads to change their ways, to accommodate the world going digital. The rewards go to those teachers and aspiring heads that provide a good traditional schooling, who manage the status quo well, meet the government specified outcomes and whose students perform well in the final exams.  All the staff remuneration models are still those of an analogue world.  Conclusion Ironically, as we discuss in a later post the greatest pressure is placed on those highly capable educational visionaries who try to educate for a world of accelerating digital evolution and transformation and seek to take advantage of the facility to learn 24/7/365. Governments seemingly globally do their utmost to control rather than encourage the mavericks. The continued constancy of schooling globally points to the enormity of the challenge of initiating and sustaining core school change and the imperative of better understanding the constraints to change, and how desired change can be sustained. Gallup Student Poll (2015) Engaged Today: Ready for Tomorrow Fall 2015 Gallup – http://www.gallup.com/services/189926/student-poll-2015-results.aspx Lee, M and Broadie, R (2018) Digitally Connected Families. And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016, Armidale, Australia, Douglas and Brown – http://douglasandbrown.com/publications/–  ; Solis, B and Szymanski, J (2016) Six Stages of Digital Transformation. The Race Against Digital Darwinism April 2016 Altimeter @Prophet – http://www.altimetergroup.com/2016/04/new-research-the-six-stages-of-digital-transformation/
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Mobile devices don’t reduce shared family time, study finds | University of Oxford

Mobile devices don’t reduce shared family time, study finds | University of Oxford | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less – but not in shared activities such as watching TV and eating.
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Being Digital

Being Digital | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Young’s learning worldwide outside the schools,trend to grow as the digital technologies evolve becomes increasingly sophisticated and powerful.
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Mobile phones and social media in emerging countries: 7 things we learned

Mobile phones and social media in emerging countries: 7 things we learned | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Mobile phone users see a mix of benefits and pitfalls related to their devices, and Facebook and WhatsApp are among the most widely used digital platforms.
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GSMA Mobile for Development | Do Mobile Connections Improve Women’s Lives?

GSMA Mobile for Development | Do Mobile Connections Improve Women’s Lives? | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
As International Women’s Day approaches this Friday, a new research study by GSMA, which represents the interests of mobile operators worldwide, and Gallup, reveals that bridging the mobile and internet gender gap may help boost women’s wellbeing across the developing world.
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TPACK as one solution to hurdles facing K-12 Innovation – Punya Mishra's Web

TPACK as one solution to hurdles facing K-12 Innovation – Punya Mishra's Web | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The Consortium of School Networking (COSN) is one of the leading associations for school system technology leaders. COSN recently released the first of three publications in their series on Driving K-12 Innovation: Hurdles 2019. The goal of this series is to “provide insights into pressing educational challenges and thoughtful, intentional use of technology to address them.” Additionally this series provides “resources and insight into strategic planning and smart technology integration into teaching and learning.” (On a side note: I had presented a keynote at the COSN conference back in 2013.) As the title suggests the focus of the first report is on the hurdles faced by school leaders as they seek to transform teaching and learning mediated by technology. The image below shows the top 5 hurdles identified in the report. One of the key hurdles they identify is The Gap between Technology & Pedagogy. As the report says, “this hurdle captures with a new sense of urgency a perennial challenge: tensions that arise when the impulse to adopt new technologies takes precedence over preparedness to use them effectively.” One of the key approaches to addressing this hurdle is “making technology an explicit component of the learning equation is an emerging concept.” I was pleased to see that one of the key frameworks cited in the report is the TPACK framework (see screenshot from the report below). There is a lot more in the report that may be of interest. You can access the complete report here. Incidentally I was told that this is COSN’s most downloaded publication to date! Note: Finally, this may not mean much to most people but I feel obligated to point out that this is the first official citation of the recently upgraded TPACK framework that was first reported on this website. (The TPACK diagram gets an upgrade).
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Schools must look to the future when connecting students to the internet

Schools must look to the future when connecting students to the internet | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
A robust, future-proof and cost-efficient internet connection for students, in and out of school, is the foundation of a 21st-century education. But many schools are blindly replicating technological paradigms from 20th-century connectivity initiatives.
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The In, and Out of School Digital Education

The In, and Out of School Digital Education | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
For the last twenty plus years the two models have run in parallel, with most schools and governments showing little or no interest in the young’s out of school digital education...
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Strategies for parents facing 'BYOD' school device spend-up | Stuff.co.nz

Strategies for parents facing 'BYOD' school device spend-up | Stuff.co.nz | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Did a bring-your-own-device policy for your child eat up your Christmas present budget?
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Do You Need a Chief Digital Officer?

Do You Need a Chief Digital Officer? | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Back in 2000, many enterprises asked: “Do we need a head of e-commerce?” But what kind of leader does an integrated digital approach require today?
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Is The Key To Agile Leadership Simply Doing Stuff?

Is The Key To Agile Leadership Simply Doing Stuff? | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
To react to the world around them, organizations need to become more agile. For leaders is the first step to becoming agile simply to start engaging?
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Change the system, change the culture

Change the system, change the culture | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The challenge of transforming large, complex organisations that have grown up around calcified hierarchies and process management structures is a hard one. There are no easy answers.It requires knowledge across various fields including technology, culture, psychology, org design, learning, networks,...
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What does educational transformation mean?

What does educational transformation mean? | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Just as the industrial revolution ushered in a mass model of schooling, the digital revolution is forcing us to rethink schooling for today's world. The biggest difference now is the rapid pace of change, which means the gap between school, society and technology is growing ever-wider.
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EdTech Strategy marks 'new era' for schools

EdTech Strategy marks 'new era' for schools | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The use of technology in education will be transformed by a new Government strategy published today to reduce teacher workload, boost student outcomes and help level the playing field for those with special needs and disabilities. GOV.UK reports.
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The Characteristics of the State of Being Digital ~ Future of CIO

The Characteristics of the State of Being Digital ~ Future of CIO | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
The shift to digital cuts across sectors, geographies and leadership roles, and it is now spreading rapidly to enable organizations of all...
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Book review – Learning Transformed: 8 Keys to Designing Tomorrow’s Schools, Today | @mcleod | Dangerously Irrelevant

Book review – Learning Transformed: 8 Keys to Designing Tomorrow’s Schools, Today | @mcleod | Dangerously Irrelevant | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
This post is a review of Learning Transformed: 8 Keys to Designing Tomorrow’s Schools, Today by Eric Sheninger and Tom Murray.Disclaimer:...
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Do Mobile Connections Improve Women's Lives?

Do Mobile Connections Improve Women's Lives? | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
A forthcoming study by GSMA and Gallup shows that bridging the mobile and internet gender gap may help boost women's wellbeing across the developing world.
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15 characteristics of IT digital maturity

15 characteristics of IT digital maturity | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Gauging IT success is about triangulating value from different lenses and peeling through IT digital maturity from a variety of angles....
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Growing Up Fast In The Age Of Technology

Growing Up Fast In The Age Of Technology | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Spread the love5SharesTechnology adapts and alters at an incredible rate. From birth, this generation has a path which will diverge greatly and more rapidly from those of the older generations, presenting a new world full of endless potential.
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How Families Have Changed in the Digital Age

How Families Have Changed in the Digital Age | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
While we sometimes think that technology is harming the family unit, there may be positive ways that families have changed in the digital age.
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5 things standing between K-12 schools and innovation

5 things standing between K-12 schools and innovation | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Sustaining and scaling innovation is one of the top hurdles K-12 district leaders face as they strive to bring new, bold ideas to education.
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Technological Monitoring of Student Work in a Classroom | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice

Technological Monitoring of Student Work in a Classroom | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
I was [in] a classroom yesterday and all of the kids had Chrome Books. They opened them midway through the class to read a few excerpts the teacher had selected.After the class, the teacher told me that he has a monitor at his desk that allows him to see what each of the kids…...
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Being Digital and Knowing How to Learn | The Digital Evolution of Schooling

Being Digital and Knowing How to Learn | The Digital Evolution of Schooling | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Mal Lee and Roger Broadie The digitally connected young of the world in naturally growing their being digital (Lee and Broadie, 2018 a) have increasingly taken charge of their learning with the technology, and developed –  invariably unwittingly – the vital art of knowing how to learn autonomously. It is a core educational capability they will use, and naturally evolve everyday lifelong – albeit outside the school walls. It is a new, historic normal that governments and most schools are seemingly unwilling to recognise or build upon, most preferring to perpetuate the myth that learning in a networked world must continue to occur only within school walls, taught and assessed in a structured manner, by professional teachers. In recent years, even the very young – before they can read and write – have instinctively taken advantage of the freedom given them by their digitally connected families to naturally grow their ability as autonomous learners. It is a natural development, and a vital educational capability that parents, governments and educators should be more consciously recognising and developing. In providing the young the agency and the technology, and freedom to directly access to the learning of the networked world, free of the traditional gatekeepers, the families have enabled their children to grow being digital (Negroponte, 1995), (Lee and Broadie, 2018 a), and in their everyday use of the technology to take charge of much of their learning, and to naturally evolve their ability to learn autonomously. It is a historic step few schools are willing to take. It gives the young a powerful base upon which to grow their learning, to use the tools in their hands creatively and to use the myriad of evolving digital resources available. They can author their own e-books, create their own blogs or videos, instantly use the likes of Google, YouTube, Wikipedia or the array of streaming services, and draw upon their friends, networks, learning packages, interest groups and specialist sites when desired – without ever having to involve a school teacher. That said, they can readily collaborate in their school studies, if the school desires. Perhaps most importantly the development has enabled near on two billion digitally connected young (UNICEF, 2017) to naturally, instinctively and largely invisibly grow their ability to learn what they want lifelong, by simply using the evolving technology provided by their families. Daily they grow their capability by doing, by discovering, by turning to friends, peers and the resources online, and searching out the assistance they require, the moment desired. Twining (2018) uses the expression ‘human learning’ to describe the approach. It has none of the fanfare, structure or cost of traditional school learning but has been immensely efficient and effective in readying near 70% of the world’s young to know how to learn, and thrive within, and accommodate a world of accelerating societal change. While schools have struggled to remain current in the digital world the young outside the school daily operate at or near the cutting edge with the technology, giving scant thought to ease with which they evolve in harmony with the accelerating change. It gives all the young, but particularly the marginalised of the world, the opportunity to naturally shed intergenerational disadvantage and to take charge of their learning and lives (UNICEF, 2017). That said the corollary is that those without the digital connectivity will be further disadvantaged. For aeons governments and educators have proclaimed the importance of individualising learning, and teaching the students how to learn. Those aspirations appear in most nation’s guiding educational principles. They are seldom effectively addressed. Aged organisational structures, tightly prescribed common curriculum, the pre-occupation with specified outcomes and standards, the focus on class groups, norm-referenced assessment, common skills tests, and external national exams all work to ensure the learning is not individualised, and the students are not readied as autonomous learners.  They are simply taught how to learn in a supervised environment. Outside the school walls, in taking advantage of families laissez faire approach to learning (Lee and Broadie, 2018 b), the young have over the last twenty plus years individualised their learning with the digital to a degree never seen in schools, and globally would appear to have taken major strides in learning how to learn lifelong with the evolving technology. Nature of the learning. On reflection, there has been a suite of related developments that have combined to bring about this historic change. From the mid 90’s the young globally instinctively opted to take charge of their out of school use of and learning with the digital and the online. They were happy to use the support provided online, and that of their peers, but saw little need to call upon their school teachers (Purcell, et.al, 2013). From the outset, the young adopted a laissez faire approach to learning with the digital, an approach based on trust, empowerment and agency, antithetical to the structured ‘control over’ model used by schools worldwide. The approach gave the young the freedom to learn what they wanted, how, when and where they desired, using the tools they thought best for the situation. Control was very much with the learner. It was a highly flexible approach, that allowed the child to collaborate with peers, to socially network, to play with the new, to try things, discover, innovate, take risks and learn from experiences. Importantly it obliged the learner to make judgements and to call the play. By the latter 90’s the Tapscott study (1998) was able to identify the traits and mores the young had universally adopted in using the online and the digital. It also noted that for the first time in human history the young often knew more about a key area of learning than their elders. Tellingly those traits had naturally grown in the young’s every day, fully integrated use of the evolving technologies. One of the traits to emerge early was the adoption of a digital mindset, where the digital underpinned near all human activities, becoming increasingly powerful, sophisticated and all – pervasive. In marked contrast to the school focus, the young, and increasingly their parents, were focussed on learning what would assist them in their everyday lives, today. They decided what they wanted to learn, not the ‘experts’. The young’s out of school learning has been – and continues to be – characterised by its on-going, highly dynamic nature. There is an unwritten recognition of needing to remain up to date, able to use the desired current technology the moment desired, lifelong. They appreciated the imperative socially, educationally and likely economically of working at or near the cutting edge. The learning is moreover strongly individualised from very early in life, the digital empowered young using the technology to pursue their own interests and passions. While ready to seek support from the technology, that online, the family, friends and from around the age of six to network with others (Chaudron, et.al, 2018) the children take charge of their own learning with the digital. In pursuing their own interests and passions they soon tailor their suite of digital tools and capabilities, tools and capabilities that will evolve and change as the technology becomes more sophisticated and they mature and vary their interests.  This is evident from the age of three onwards (Chaudron, 2015, Lee and Broadie, 2018 b) with siblings invariably quickly – and rightly – developing different digital skillsets. We say ‘rightly’ very deliberately, because children in different global settings, with different interests and needs should grow the apt capabilities, and do as we all naturally now do and develop those used most. In a world of diverse interests, and uses of the digital technology it is naïve to assume – as most school authorities now do – that all the nation’s young should learn a common, ‘one size fits all’ set of practises. The moment a game changing technological development occurs the young will rightly use the facility, happy to discard or trash the superseded technology. In individualising and continually updating their suite of digital tools and capabilities the young are naturally- but likely unwittingly – evaluating their needs, and growing the ability to take charge of their learning in a continually evolving, often uncertain digital world. History reveals the young have continually been to the fore in the adoption of the new technologies and practises (Lee and Winzenried, 2009), handling with ease the accelerating evolution, with no hint that is about to change. That capability has been enhanced at all age levels by having immediate connectivity, the young being able to use the digital and the networked world the moment they believe it is important. It might only be photographing a noteworthy moment, contacting peers for assistance or checking information but is that sense of control that is important. It allows them to learn just in time and in context. Something that would not be allowed in most schools. Application of the self- directed learning The digitally empowered young demonstrate their ability to take charge of their own use of and learning with the digital, and particularly touchscreen, technology from very early in life, naturally growing their ability to use the evolving media for the desired purposes (Chaudron, et.al, 2018). Critically the signs indicate they will naturally evolve that capability lifelong, with family and peer support, regardless of what the schools do, developing their capacity to use the myriad of apps and online resources the moment desired. The Apple and Google app stores alone each have over two million different apps. Significantly the young, seemingly worldwide, have grown – and are daily growing their understanding how to learn, particularly with the digital with no assistance from most educators or schools. Enhancement and collaboration We are not for a moment suggesting that capability can’t be enhanced. It most assuredly should be. Few of the young will for example be developing the many skills associated with scientific, or the broader academic learning. They will need to be grown. But grown in a manner that builds upon the attributes already acquired, attributes the young will continue to evolve lifelong regardless. Those attributes must be valued, not as now devalued and dismissed as trivial. Ideally the work of the young and their families should be complemented by the schools. But at this stage history strongly suggests most schools and governments will continue to refuse to collaborate, dismissing the efforts of the families, and asserting that only they can, and should teach the young how to learn (Lee and Broadie, 2018b). Conclusion The young’s naturally learning how to learn is shaping as another historic change in youth education, and another instance of where the invariably tightly controlled, and inflexible traditional school approach to learning will remain at odds with the learning and education of the young of the world outside the school walls. Once again it seems likely it will be left to digitally connected families or the exceptional visionary schools to markedly enhance this critical educational skill. Chaudron, S (2015) Young Children (0-8) and Digital TechnologyLuxembourg, European Commission JRC and Policy Reports 2015 –http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC93239 Chaudron S, Di Gioia R, Gemo M, (2018) Young children (0-8) and digital technology, a qualitative study across Europe; EUR 29070; doi:10.2760/294383
- Lee, M and Broadie, R (2018 a) ‘Being Digital’ Linkedin – https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/being-digital-mal-lee/?published=t Lee, M and Broadie, R (2018) Digitally Connected Families. And the Digital Education of the World’s Young, 1993 – 2016, Armidale, Australia, Douglas and Brown – http://douglasandbrown.com/publications/– Purcell. K, Heaps, A, Buchanan, J and Friedrich, l (2013) ‘How Teachers are Using Technology at Home and in Their Classroom’. Pew Internet– http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teachers-and-technology Tapscott, D (1998), Growing up digital: The rise of the Net Generation, McGraw Hill, New York Twining, P (2018) ‘What do you mean by learning?’ The halfbaked.education blog, 11thSeptember 2018. https://halfbaked.education/?p=63(accessed 26-Sept-2018) UNICEF (2017)Children in a Digital World. The State of the World’s Children 2017. UNICEF December 2017 – https://www.unicef.org/publications/files/SOWC_2017_ENG_WEB.pdf
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From ‘Doing’ to ‘Being’ Digital - CIO Journal - WSJ

From ‘Doing’ to ‘Being’ Digital - CIO Journal - WSJ | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Digital transformation is often discussed in terms of the tech tools involved, but it’s about much more than just technology. Digital maturity requires a comprehensive strategic plan that can propel a company beyond simply “doing” a series of unrelated projects to “being” truly digital at its core.
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Complexity: A Leader's Framework for Understanding and Managing Change in Higher Education | EDUCAUSE

Complexity: A Leader's Framework for Understanding and Managing Change in Higher Education | EDUCAUSE | Digital Evolution of Schooling | Scoop.it
Complex adaptive systems offer higher education leaders a framework for understanding dramatic systemic change as well as approaches to engaging, mana...
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