WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
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WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
Going digital in your business? I select the best posts and highlight the reasons why it matters. Like it? Click "recommend" + register to get the digest in your inbox: http://fmcs.digital/newsletter-signup/
Curated by Farid Mheir
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Mobileye says Tesla auto braking tech wasn’t designed for scenario behind fatal crash

Mobileye says Tesla auto braking tech wasn’t designed for scenario behind fatal crash | WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation | Scoop.it
Following yesterday’s news of the NHTSA’s investigation into a fatal crash involving a Tesla Model S, Mobileye, the Israeli technology company helping..
Farid Mheir's insight:

Fatal car crash of a Tesla on highway using automated driving mode. The post provides some information about the crash, which appears to be due to a condition that was never programmed into the system (side hit).

 

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

Autonomous vehicles will become more and more popular in the future and this event reminds us of the complexities involved. We are very early in this field and much like aviation there should be formal investigations and corrective actions taken when such crash occur so that all manufacturers can learn from crashes. This calls for an international database of car crashes and there should be mandatory requirements for new self-driving systems to "pass" the exam ie. to ensure they all react correctly to previously seen car crashes and other incidents. 

 

This thus becomes an opportunity to learn from the global past experience of millions of drivers and billions of kilometers driven in all conditions, across all countries. I am not aware of such a central database but would expect it to become a reality if we want autonomous driving to be a transformation beyond what we have today: each driver learning for themselve.

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Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It

Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It | WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation | Scoop.it
I was driving 70 mph on the edge of downtown St. Louis when the exploit began to take hold.
Farid Mheir's insight:

A team of engineers remotely gain control over a Jeep and demonstrate vulnerabilities in its computer systems.


WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

I wrote about this before as a reminder that digital transformation enables great new opportunities as well as new security and privacy issues.


More about this here http://www.scoop.it/t/digital-transformation-of-businesses/?tag=carJacking 

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Rob Joyce's curator insight, July 23, 2015 7:16 AM

Hackers Remotely

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All Teslas will get an over-the-air update this June allowing them to drive in "Autopilot" mode

All Teslas will get an over-the-air update this June allowing them to drive in "Autopilot" mode | WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation | Scoop.it

it seems Autopilot will be disabled when you're not doing freeway driving, which is by far the easiest aspect of autonomous vehicle activity. Musk did confirm that the Autopilot mode would be "technically capable of driving from parking lot to parking lot." The car will also be allowed to drive itself when you summon it, and when you're parking it in your garage.

Farid Mheir's insight:

A great review of the self-driving car solutions, with links to other articles on the subject.

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Great #IoT example: Tesla cars Over-the-Air Repairs Are the Way Forward via MIT @TechReview

Great #IoT example: Tesla cars Over-the-Air Repairs Are the Way Forward via MIT @TechReview | WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation | Scoop.it
Tesla and GM have both issued fire-related recalls, but Tesla’s fix doesn’t require owners to bring their cars in.
Farid Mheir's insight:

Benefits of having an Internet connected device - here a car - is that it can be remotely updated to fix issues or tune performance. Convenience and fast improvements.


Remember that this means it can also be remotely monitored, both for good and bad reasons, which may also raise security and privacy concerns.

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@Defcon: Remotely Hacking Tire Pressure Monitors- how to control your car from its tires via @securityjh

@Defcon: Remotely Hacking Tire Pressure Monitors- how to control your car from its tires via @securityjh | WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation | Scoop.it

A new vector for hacking a cars computer wirelessly.


I attended an interesting talk at Defcon today that revealed a potential security vulnerability that I never would have thought of in a million years. Yep, hacking the tire pressure monitoring system in your car. The talk called "Letting the Air out of tire pressure monitoring systems" was by Mike Metzger. Turns out the attack surface for such an attack is huge. In the U.S. the Tread Act mandated that every car built after 2007 must have a tire pressure monitoring system built-in. It also turns out that car tire pressure monitors (TPMSS) use unencrypted RF for the communication between the tire and the receiver. TPMS sensor alarms are what turn on that annoying low pressure light we are all familiar with on your dash console.

Farid Mheir's insight:

I had read about this back in 2010 and use this examples in my presentations regarding security and the future of digital transformations. Everything digital should be design with protection in mind because it will be hacked.


Also see other posts you may have missed:

  • Flying hacker contraption hunts other drones to control them- proof we are in a "digital far west era" via @ars http://sco.lt/8v5ATB
  • How your movements create a GPS 'fingerprint'- anonymous data is not enough to ensure privacy http://sco.lt/5KfaiX
  • Hacker Shows How To Attack An Airplane's Systems--Using A Phone http://sco.lt/97hSPx
  • NSA infiltrates links to Yahoo, Google data centers worldwide, Snowden documents say via @washingtonpost http://sco.lt/5z0Es5


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A world where everything is hackable via @Strata @acroll

A world where everything is hackable via @Strata @acroll | WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation | Scoop.it

Let’s say you fancy a fast car. Flavio Garcia, a University of Birmingham computer scientist, discovered the algorithim that verifies the ignition key for luxury cars like Porsches, Audis, Bentleys, and Lamborghinis. He was slapped with an injunction to ban him from disclosing his findings at the Usenix Security Symposium in order to prevent sophisticated criminal gangs from having the analytics tools for widespread car theft.

You might need Garcia’s algorithm to steal a car, but soon, with an entirely different algorithm, you may be able to crash one into a tree or disable its brakes from a distance. Or maybe it’s a fast boat you’re after. Mess with its GPS, and you can steer it where you want without the crew noticing.

Farid Mheir's insight:

This post is full of very relevant and useful links. Building on what is in this piece, I suggest the following to get a feel for the evil side of these hacks. 


Listen to the 60 minutes report on the stuxnet and the flame viruses, which were recently used to attack nuclear facilities in Iran. Also read an interesting report during a recent security conference of simulated attacks on an oil rig or another post on potential security concerns with airplanes.


Digital transformations ultimately will mean everything will be digital - corporations, things, and most of what people see and do. And when you get to 100% digital and 100% connected, some of what Alistair is describing will become common place.



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Farid Mheir's curator insight, November 13, 2016 1:59 PM

This post is full of very relevant and useful links. Building on what is in this piece, I suggest the following to get a feel for the evil side of these hacks. 

 

Listen to the 60 minutes report on the stuxnet and the flame viruses, which were recently used to attack nuclear facilities in Iran. Also read an interesting report during a recent security conference of simulated attacks on an oil rig or another post on potential security concerns with airplanes.

 

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

Digital transformations ultimately will mean everything will be digital - corporations, things, and most of what people see and do. And when you get to 100% digital and 100% connected, some of what Alistair is describing will become common place.

Felix Cheang's curator insight, November 13, 2016 7:36 PM

As long as there is a chip inside, anything is hackable....

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A world where everything is hackable via @Strata @acroll

A world where everything is hackable via @Strata @acroll | WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation | Scoop.it

Let’s say you fancy a fast car. Flavio Garcia, a University of Birmingham computer scientist, discovered the algorithm that verifies the ignition key for luxury cars like Porsches, Audis, Bentleys, and Lamborghinis. He was slapped with an injunction to ban him from disclosing his findings at the Usenix Security Symposium in order to prevent sophisticated criminal gangs from having the analytics tools for widespread car theft.

You might need Garcia’s algorithm to steal a car, but soon, with an entirely different algorithm, you may be able to crash one into a tree or disable its brakes from a distance. Or maybe it’s a fast boat you’re after. Mess with its GPS, and you can steer it where you want without the crew noticing.

Farid Mheir's insight:

This post is full of very relevant and useful links. Building on what is in this piece, I suggest the following to get a feel for the evil side of these hacks. 

 

Listen to the 60 minutes report on the stuxnet and the flame viruses, which were recently used to attack nuclear facilities in Iran. Also read an interesting report during a recent security conference of simulated attacks on an oil rig or another post on potential security concerns with airplanes.

 

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

Digital transformations ultimately will mean everything will be digital - corporations, things, and most of what people see and do. And when you get to 100% digital and 100% connected, some of what Alistair is describing will become common place.

more...
Farid Mheir's curator insight, August 30, 2013 10:01 AM

This post is full of very relevant and useful links. Building on what is in this piece, I suggest the following to get a feel for the evil side of these hacks. 


Listen to the 60 minutes report on the stuxnet and the flame viruses, which were recently used to attack nuclear facilities in Iran. Also read an interesting report during a recent security conference of simulated attacks on an oil rig or another post on potential security concerns with airplanes.


Digital transformations ultimately will mean everything will be digital - corporations, things, and most of what people see and do. And when you get to 100% digital and 100% connected, some of what Alistair is describing will become common place.



Felix Cheang's curator insight, November 13, 2016 7:36 PM

As long as there is a chip inside, anything is hackable....

Curated by Farid Mheir
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