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Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung

Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"In the heart of Thailand’s most populous city, an oasis stands out from the urban landscape like a great “green lung.” That’s the nickname given to Bang Kachao—a lush protected area that has escaped the dense development seen elsewhere in Bangkok.  The city is built on the alluvial plain of the Chao Phraya River. Toward the southern end, near the Gulf of Thailand, is an old meander that never quite formed an oxbow lake. That meander traces the boundary of Bang Kachao, which TIME magazine once called the 'best urban oasis' in Asia.  According to a travel story in The New York Times, Bang Kachao is gaining popularity among tourists lured by bike tours, a floating farmers’ market, and the relaxed atmosphere."


Tags: physical, fluvial, remote sensing, land use, Thailand, Southeast Asia, urban ecology.

brielle blais's insight:
This showcases how important physical geography is. This "green lung" breaks up the high urbanized Bangkok. This helps the environment thrive and helps to cut down of emissions that affect climate change which is a problem in some areas. 
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 12:32 PM

These pictures of the heart of Thailand is very interesting and intriguing because the viewer can get a view of what the city Bang Kachao really looks from a arial view. The researcher call Bang Kachao the green lung because the area looks like a lung as well as the meander that formed an oxbow lake. Every country. city has different landmarks that make the location their own such as Michigan whose borders look like a mitten. Bang Kachao is becoming larger and growing more and more in population such as tourists, farmers and bike tourers. This location has a relaxed atmosphere and the Landsat image gives it justice, showing its actual size as a city based on its location near the Chao Phraya River towards the Gulf of Thailand which allows for access to the gulf and other different trading advantages.

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:51 AM

This scoop shows an example of built environmental space. The highly urban and crowded Thailand has little green space. So why is this massive green park looking landmass there? Its a strictly environmental section of land to help water flow into the ocean. The people call it the "green lung" because its plants give off oxygen and provide a contrast from its urban sprawl. This article shows the importance that should be placed on having more strictly environmental places in big cities. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:06 PM

It's interesting to see the mixture of natural and manmade landscapes in this image. Humans have an enormous influence on the world around us- we have moved entire rivers for our own purposes, reshaped entire regions. In China, we have literally made it rain. Therefore, it's nice to see remnants of the rich environments that used to cover the urban sprawls of many of the world's largest cities, like Central Park in New York. Bang Kachao in Bangkok is another example of this, a reminder of the richness of the region before it was overwhelmed by the urban development that has characterized Bangkok over the previous century. The oasis serves as a valuable tourist attraction, as Westerners come to enjoy the bike trails and small farming community within Thailand's green lung. Leave it to hipsters to travel halfway across the globe just to enjoy nature within the confines of one of the world's largest cities. 

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Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung

Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"In the heart of Thailand’s most populous city, an oasis stands out from the urban landscape like a great “green lung.” That’s the nickname given to Bang Kachao—a lush protected area that has escaped the dense development seen elsewhere in Bangkok.  The city is built on the alluvial plain of the Chao Phraya River. Toward the southern end, near the Gulf of Thailand, is an old meander that never quite formed an oxbow lake. That meander traces the boundary of Bang Kachao, which TIME magazine once called the 'best urban oasis' in Asia.  According to a travel story in The New York Times, Bang Kachao is gaining popularity among tourists lured by bike tours, a floating farmers’ market, and the relaxed atmosphere."


Tags: physical, fluvial, remote sensing, land use, Thailand, Southeast Asia, urban ecology.

brielle blais's insight:
This showcases how important physical geography is. This "green lung" breaks up the high urbanized Bangkok. This helps the environment thrive and helps to cut down of emissions that affect climate change which is a problem in some areas. 
more...
Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 12:32 PM

These pictures of the heart of Thailand is very interesting and intriguing because the viewer can get a view of what the city Bang Kachao really looks from a arial view. The researcher call Bang Kachao the green lung because the area looks like a lung as well as the meander that formed an oxbow lake. Every country. city has different landmarks that make the location their own such as Michigan whose borders look like a mitten. Bang Kachao is becoming larger and growing more and more in population such as tourists, farmers and bike tourers. This location has a relaxed atmosphere and the Landsat image gives it justice, showing its actual size as a city based on its location near the Chao Phraya River towards the Gulf of Thailand which allows for access to the gulf and other different trading advantages.

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:51 AM

This scoop shows an example of built environmental space. The highly urban and crowded Thailand has little green space. So why is this massive green park looking landmass there? Its a strictly environmental section of land to help water flow into the ocean. The people call it the "green lung" because its plants give off oxygen and provide a contrast from its urban sprawl. This article shows the importance that should be placed on having more strictly environmental places in big cities. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:06 PM

It's interesting to see the mixture of natural and manmade landscapes in this image. Humans have an enormous influence on the world around us- we have moved entire rivers for our own purposes, reshaped entire regions. In China, we have literally made it rain. Therefore, it's nice to see remnants of the rich environments that used to cover the urban sprawls of many of the world's largest cities, like Central Park in New York. Bang Kachao in Bangkok is another example of this, a reminder of the richness of the region before it was overwhelmed by the urban development that has characterized Bangkok over the previous century. The oasis serves as a valuable tourist attraction, as Westerners come to enjoy the bike trails and small farming community within Thailand's green lung. Leave it to hipsters to travel halfway across the globe just to enjoy nature within the confines of one of the world's largest cities. 

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How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see one every day and never give give it a second thought. But in Yangon, Myanmar in 2013, an ATM was a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one from the U.S. or Europe did business there."

brielle blais's insight:
This showcases how different cultures in different places really are. The idea of credit cards in Myanmar isn't exactly greeted with positivity. Most people are skeptical of the banks and keep their money at home instead. This way of living seems so different to people from places like the US because Myanmar doesn't have and connection to the US with institutions such as banks and atm. However this way of running a country does not allow for anything to be fixed, which is why is it so rugged, with cars with no floors, awful roads, and anything else that a bank would normally help fund. 
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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, April 11, 2018 9:11 AM
We often take for granted our infrastructe and in this case our banking system. Have we seen recessions, yes , have we seen our banks fail yes, but to not trust them at all well thats another story. In pretty much every American city and most major cities around the world ATMs are very common. I am pretty sure most of us have used an ATM at least once if not all of the time. So when the small country of Myanmar had its sanctions lifted and VISA and Mastecard had the opportunity to put in ATMs they went for it and thought it would be a great ooportunity. They did forsee what would happen though. Myanmar citizens had almost no confidence in their banking system thus most people just kept their money at home with them. So since they did not have money in the banks they did not need to use the ATMs. Its very important for companies, even big ones such as Visa and Mastercard, to understand the market and the culture of the population in which they are setting up the business. If Visa and Mastercard had done a little more research they might have foreseen this problem. In this ever global world it is important for businesses to remain culuturally aware or risk losing mililons.  For start up companies or investment companies it becomes even more important as they do market research as well.
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ORIGINAL: EAST ASIA

ORIGINAL: EAST ASIA | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
Bicycles have long been the quickest way to navigate the traffic-choked streets of Seoul. But far from a last resort, cycling has become a national pastime throughout South Korea.
brielle blais's insight:
Climate change is a huge problem for all countries. In the case of South Korea, 1000 miles of paved pathway have been put in to eliminate the emissions of carbon dioxide that cars give off. This will help save the environment and physical geography of South Korea as things are now healthier 
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China pollution: First ever red alert in effect in Beijing

China pollution: First ever red alert in effect in Beijing | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Schools in Beijing are closed and outdoor construction halted as the Chinese capital's first ever pollution "red alert" comes into effect over smog levels."

brielle blais's insight:
This article shows the harm one country can cause when prioritizing their economic growth over protecting the environment and maintaining public safety. The geography of China is that it is surrounded in the South and East by industrialized cities. This has increased air pollution such as smog and forces the people to wear masks and even drive cars on an alternating schedule. This calls for a new global deal on climate change to fix the air quality and way of life for people in China and around the world. 
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Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 11:03 AM

It is a real shame that China has let pollution go this far in its country. It really goes to show the sacrifices they are willing to make in order to be a major global economic power. Unfortunately for them this kind of action and rapid growth by cutting corners is what will likely stop them from becoming a major power (due to fast resource exhaustion and loss of environmental resources due to pollutants over time as well as species). The issue will likely remain unsolved due to the Chinese governments lack of concern. Hopefully China's slow shift to a consumer market will provide pollution relief as the factories leave for elsewhere (likely Africa).

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 6:39 PM

It's horrible to see China come to this. Soon, air pollution will be just as bad everywhere else if it is not stopped. We, everyone, has to do something to stop air pollution. This world is polluted enough. Stop air pollution so future generations can have a chance to have a good life and not have to worry about PM levels are in the air on a daily basis.

Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 2018 11:35 PM
Another example of the impacts of China's disregard for environmentally sustainable practices. The city's industry and thousands of cars produce massive amounts of pollutants, making the air difficult to breathe on most days.
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Homeland of tea

Homeland of tea | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"China is the world’s biggest tea producer, selling many varieties of tea leaves such as green tea, black tea, oolong tea, white tea and yellow tea. Different regions are famous for growing different types of tea. Hangzhou is famous for producing a type of green tea called Longjing or the Dragon Well tea. Tea tastes also vary regionally. Drinkers in Beijing tend to prefer jasmine tea while in Shanghai prefer green tea. Processing raw tea leaves for consumption is a time and labor-intensive activity and still done by hand in many areas in China. The Chinese tea industry employs around 80 million people as farmers, pickers and sales people. Tea pickers tend to be seasonal workers who migrate from all parts of the country during harvest time. In 2016, China produced 2.43 million tons of tea."

brielle blais's insight:
This shows the importance of a product to a countries economy, culture, and use of physical geography. China is the worlds biggest producer of tea. This stimulates the economy greatly, and gives 80 millions people jobs as farmers, pickets and in sales. Exporting the tea to other countries also helps the economy. The workers are seasonal, and travel to the tea come harvest season. This also boost the economy in the travel sector. Tea is also hugely part of the cultural geography of China as it is believed to bring wisdom and lift the spirit to a higher level. 
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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 11, 2018 1:11 PM
When I first read that tea was the most popular drink in the world I was a bit surprised.  But once I thought about where tea was popular, specifically China and the United Kingdom (not to mention all the areas that they once colonized), it definitely made sense that tea was consumed by so many.  After looking at all of the images regarding tea production, a few things stood out to me.  First, almost all of the employees on the tea plantations were females.  I’m guessing that women are probably not educated to the same extent as men in the regions where most tea is grown and that is why they must take the low skill jobs of picking tea leaves.  Another thing that caught my attention was how much land is used to produce tea.  The regions in China where tea is grown have vast, rolling fields of tea that seem to reflect what the economies in these areas are based off.  It doesn’t seem like too many people that do not work in the tea industry live in these areas because tea takes up most of the land and because there seem to be no jobs outside of the industry.  I’ve heard of tourism based on cuisine or alcohol consumption, but I wasn’t aware there was entire tea tourism industry.  This article highlighted tea expos where people would gather to work as tea art masters or sample teas from the region.  The tea industry is much larger and more complex than I ever would have guessed, but it tells me that my perspective on the world is tainted with a Western point of view.  Obviously a lot of Americans drink tea, but it is not as popular a beverage as say Coca-Cola.  But the rest of the world drinks so much tea, that entire regions of China are shaped by the industry.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 2, 2018 9:49 PM
(East Asia) China, the founder of tea, is the largest producer of the most consumed drink in the world. With such an enormous country, regional differences between tea cultivation and culture naturally developed. There are approximately 80 million people involved in tea cultivation, which is non-mechanized in many parts. Linking tea with sanctity, farmers work long hours and come from across China seasonally.

A series of images follows the article. Most remarkable are the depictions of old and young Chinese farmers handpicking tea leaves, the vast plantations and agricultural architecture, and the tea tourism industry
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:04 PM
This article looks into how the popular beverage, tea, is produced. China is not only the world's largest producer, but also creates many different types of tea including green, black and dragons well. The drink was discovered in 2737 by a Chinese emperor, and the industry employs approximately 80 million people and it produced 2.43 million tons in 2016
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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.
brielle blais's insight:
This article shows how important it is for countries to have good relationships with one another. This is an example of political geography. Diverting the Nile would help Ethiopia immensely, producing electricity and providing a water source. Egypt and Sudan were able to create a compromise and agree to share, and a long dispute is now over.
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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 31, 2016 11:57 AM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 2016 12:19 AM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

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Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying.

Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying. | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
In Madagascar, the booming charcoal business is contributing to deforestation and may exacerbate the effects of global warming.
brielle blais's insight:
Charcoal has become the unlikely hero of the informal economy of Africa. This is a positive for the economy. However, this is not a positive for the environment. Deforestation has become a large issue since the boom of more people using charcoal. This will speed up the issue of climate change. This post shows the negative and positives a product can have involving geography.
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Launceston College Geography's curator insight, February 1, 2017 10:44 PM

deforestation

Launceston College Geography's curator insight, June 13, 2017 9:51 PM

Deforestation drivers

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 9, 2017 9:41 AM
If we know that furthering education and economic opportunities will help alleviate the problems present here, why aren't we as a planet seeing that they are implemented? 
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ORIGINAL: SOUTH ASIA

ORIGINAL: SOUTH ASIA | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
More than 800,000 volunteers pitched in to help the country fight climate change.
brielle blais's insight:
Climate change and global warming are real factors that are destroying the planet. Physical geographies of countries are changing, and in turn causing a domino affect in impacting other sectors of geography, whether it is political, economic, etc. India, however, took matters into it's own hands by planting 50 million trees to reduce carbon emissions and also improve air quality. 
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India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt

India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).  Hospitals are on alert to treat victims of heatstroke and authorities advised people to stay indoors with no end in sight to the searing conditions.  In the worst-hit state of Andhra Pradesh, in the south, 551 people have died in the past week as temperatures hit 47 degrees Celsius on Monday." 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, India, South Asia.

brielle blais's insight:
India is facing a change in their physical geography as climate change continues to prove itself to be a real problem. The amount of energy being used to air condition homes is astounding and the government is worried of massive power outages. "India's power industry has long struggled to meet rapidly rising demand in Asia's third largest economy, with poorly maintained transmission lines and overloaded grids." Physical geography can effect the economy as well. 
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Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:24 PM

we really ever hear about extreme weather like this unless it affects us directly. "551 people have died in the last week" This is a state of emergency but those in the west will never hear about it. What a shame. I wonder if part of it is that politics in the west wouldn't want you hearing about this as it might support the climate change agenda.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 5, 2018 2:34 PM
Not to make a joke of a serious situation, but I almost cannot function when the weather hits 80 degrees and I value air conditioning as much as oxygen sometimes (I am a baby when it comes to heat).  So the fact that people in New Delhi and the surrounding areas had to deal with temperatures of 122 degrees makes me cringe and sweat just thinking about it.  This article brings up some interesting points about how sometimes the weather can reveal the shortcomings of a society.  First of all, the fact that people actually died because of heat says to me that the government was not prepared to deal with this type of crisis.  There wasn't adequate resources to give people the necessities of water and shelter when facing such high temperatures.  It seems like in this type of heat people probably cannot function as they normally can, so it seems like a system should have been better prepared to keep people indoors and hydrated.  Another flaw of the government that is revealed in this type of weather is poor infrastructure.  The article says that the electrical grids of cities are being overwhelmed by air conditioning use and wide outages were possible.  In an area with a high population and the potential of facing such extreme weather, there should be more of a priority placed on repairing and maintaining electrical grids and wiring.  The high heat also exposed that the roads weren't built to sustain this weather because it literally started melting.  This unfortunate incident in India shows that humans can control a lot these days, but the weather is still untouchable.  The best way to deal with extreme weather is to be better prepared to face it.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 24, 2018 1:31 PM
(South Asia) India, with the second largest population in the world and a developing infrastructure, often faces heatwaves due to its climate. But recently the heat, spurred by climate change, led to hundreds of deaths. There is no doubt that there are more deaths than can be reported due to the country's largely isolated and rural populations. In this article from 2015, the temperature reached 122 Fahrenheit. The heat causes numerous urban problems, such as  power outages due to ACs and melting roads, but most deaths typically happen in poorer areas.
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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.
brielle blais's insight:
This article showcases how different aspects of geography can both help and harm a country. The Ganges River is incredibly important to India. It is a sacred place where the people believe in Ganges, the idea of allowing the dead to reach eternal liberation. Here, hundreds of bodies are burned a day. If they aren't burned, family members of the deceased let the dead float down the river. This phenomenon attracts many tourist and allows for the economy of India to thrive. However, the bodies are beginning to seriously pollute the river. Areas have become stagnant, full of disease. The problem doesn't end however, as India's population is increasing steadily as well. Water needs to be cleaned to meet the demand or India will face a true crisis.
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Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 24, 2018 1:20 PM
(South Asia) Varanasi, the oldest city in India and the religious center of Hinduism, has an enormous business focusing around cremating bodies to scatter in the Ganges River. Hindus believe the Ganges can break the cycle of reincarnation, so many who do not have money to pay for cremation drop their deceased directly into the river to help them break this cycle. However, the river supports approximately 10% of the entire worlds' population and belief in Ganga, "the self-cleaning river god" allows for Indians to poison the same water they drink out of. It is estimated that 70% of people that use the water become diseased by the sewage and industrial waste poured into it.
India cannot stop dependence on the river. Hindus bath in the holy water of the Ganges, and an increasing population means increased water consumption. It will take concentrated efforts from government and spiritual leaders to change the dominate opinion.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 2:52 PM
10. Approximately 10% of the world's population lives on the Ganges river basin. Soak that in for a second. 10 % of the world's population rely on one way or another this religiously significant river. The god of the river, Ganga, is worshipped, but the river is also highly polluted. With waste both artificial and human, being thrown into the river and the number of dead bodies that float down to Varanasi, the oldest city in India, to be cremated. As dead bodies flow down the river the people still need to use it to wash. There are ceremonies that the people on the river hold where they dump waste into the river as they know that Ganga will clean the river. The pollution of the river is an issue that will, unfortunately, continue as India's population continues to grow. 
 
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ORIGINAL: CENTRAL ASIA 

ORIGINAL: CENTRAL ASIA  | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
A $102 million biosecurity laboratory set to open in Kazakhstan will help scientists study dangerous diseases such as plague, which is re-emerging in Central Asia.
brielle blais's insight:
This post is interesting because the roughly ten thousand year old disease that is famously known as the Bubonic Plague is reemerging in Kazakstan.This is important to geography because it can still potentially kill a lot of people in developing countries, changing demographic completely. This is why a new, high-tech laboratory is being built in Kazakstan, in hopes "that this will become a regional center for scientists from throughout Central Asia and the Caucuses to exchange information and conduct training and research," and potentially stop the possible death toll. 
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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    

brielle blais's insight:
This post shows the importance of trade to each country, so much so that Samoa was able to get the International Dateline changed to accommodate their trade needs, skipping a day and allowing easier economic networks with China and Australia, who are important trading partners. 
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WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 1:06 PM

This is to me the coolest geographic location in the World... A group of islands nation located in both the south and north hemispheres and also to both the east and west of the international time line zone.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 1, 2015 8:06 PM

500 birthdays were taken away due to an international date line. In Samoa is in a confused state between the united states and the Asian pacific side of the timeline which would cause time and dates to be confusing.Dynamic economic networks and political allegiances have created a very difficult situation for the people near the border in Samoa.  The International Date line in Samoa is something that is needed to be watched and paid attention because it can affect people in ways that can be very significant even at a small tiny rate.

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 11:11 PM
The International date line is a tricky situation, initially more thought should have been put into it considering it is just a straight line right down the middle of some islands. One could be next door neighbors with someone who's calendar day is Saturday while they are already are on Sunday. Talk about jet lag.  
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The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally

The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"This year, we’ve seen alarming bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef, caused by warm sea temperatures. A recently completed aerial survey of the reef found that 93 percent of the smaller reefs that comprise it showed at least some bleaching, and in the northern sector of the reef, the large majority of reefs saw bleaching that was severe — meaning many of these corals could die.  There was already considerable murmuring that this event, which damages a famous World Heritage site and could deal a blow to a highly valuable tourism industry, did not simply happen by chance. And now, a near real-time analysis by a group of Australian climate and coral reef researchers has affirmed that the extremely warm March sea temperatures in the Coral Sea, which are responsible for the event, were hardly natural."

 

Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

brielle blais's insight:
This post shows the type of tragedies that inflict the physical geography of Australia due to global warming. Warmer sea temperatures are causing the coral to slowly die and become "bleached" or white. This is not unnatural, as humans are the biggest cause of this problem. This heavily affects not only the physical geography and climate, but also the tourism sector of Australia's economy, as the Great Barrier reef stimulates the countries economy a lot, and it is now dying. 
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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:30 PM
As the temperature of the sea rises, the great barrier reef has seen some devastating bleaching. Because of its severity, many of these corals, that were once beautiful and pigmented, could die. Researchers have discovered that this rise in temperature is due to humans.
K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 2018 7:30 PM
The Great barrier Reef is ana amazing area to explore. Its truly a marvel and a beautiful site. It is also a major boost for tourism and well the majorty of the Reef is seeing heavy bleaching. The updated analysis is that most of the damage has done done by higher sea temps caused by climate change through human beings. Most of these studies however, have not been peer reviewed, but the study was very through. If this continues to happen we will see one of the worlds great marvels continue to to bleach and many of the corals could die.  This is devasting for a few reasons first off people that want to visit this beautiful site and take it in this limits there opportunity. Also for the locals this will greatly hurt the tourism business. Tourism is a huge ecnomic boost in this area and if the Reef continues to be damaged we could see a major turn in the economics in this area. This could eventually lead to the upright in migration from this area and could cause other issues within the country. People owning businesses in the area could be greatly affected as well. This would be a shame to see a beautiful area be tarnished.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 5:30 PM
A terrible occurrence in many ways for the Great Barrier reef in Australia. This bleaching is occurring because of warm sea temperatures. The damage could cause many corals to die and that forces other animals to adapt and migrate. This is an environmental issue that definitely needs to be looked at, but it is also an issue for Australia's tourism. Ecotourism is a huge pull for Australia that gets people and money into the country so it is in their best interests to figure out a way to save the Great Barrier Reef.
 
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Indonesia on Fire

"In Indonesia’s Central Kalimantan province, the peat areas are burning and emitting a toxic smoke causing untold damage to the environment, wildlife and human health. Most of the fires in Central Kalimantan are blazing in former peatland forests, which have been drained, cleared and burned for oil palm and agriculture, large and small. The dried-out peat ignites easily, burns underground and creeps under the surface. Experts from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) travel to the heart of the fires to see the situation with their own eyes and measure the extent of the impact."
More information please visit: http://blog.cifor.org/fire

brielle blais's insight:
Burning things that emit a toxic smoke causes damages to not just one country, but many around them as well. This not only affects the environment and physical geography of a nation, but disturbs the political geography as other nations become enraged that the emitted smoke is a mystery and ruining health.
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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 2018 1:05 PM
These fires are continuously devastating the Kalimantan province by releasing enormous quantities of greenhouse gasses every year into the atmosphere. There are some efforts underway to combat the damage of the fire by re-moistening the soil and trying to get wildlife and vegetation to take hold once again. However, that is an ongoing struggle and satellite technology continues to display the growing areas affected by these fires. 
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The other Asian tiger

The other Asian tiger | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Vietnam's success merits a closer look."

 

Which Asian country has roared ahead over the past quarter-century, with millions of its people escaping poverty? And which Asian economy, still mainly rural, will be the continent’s next dynamo? Most would probably respond “China” to the first question and “India” to the second. But these answers would overlook a country that, in any other part of the world, would stand out for its past success and future promise.

Vietnam, with a population of more than 90m, has notched up the world’s second-fastest growth rate per person since 1990, behind only China. If it can maintain a 7% pace over the next decade, it will follow the same trajectory as erstwhile Asian tigers such as South Korea and Taiwan. Quite an achievement for a country that in the 1980s was emerging from decades of war and was as poor as Ethiopia.

 

Tags: Vietnam, globalization, development, economic, SouthEastAsia.

brielle blais's insight:
This showcases how quickly economies can bounce back or change. For a long time China and India were thought to be Asia's two economic dynamic duo. However, despite the decades of war that struck the country and ruined the economy and were as poor as Ethiopia, Vietnam has had a 7% increase the growth rate per person. This alters political geographies and economic geographies. 
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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 20, 2018 11:33 AM
Like this article points out in the beginning, Vietnam is not a country I typically think of when talking about countries who's economies are growing rapidly.  I think that there are still leftover thoughts from the Vietnam War over the state that the country is in.  By expanding manufacturing, they were able to boost employment and exports- two keys to a healthy economy.  Vietnam has also become heavily involved in global trade, which now accounts for a large part of its GDP.  They have been able to take advantage of their physical location nearby China by offering lower prices for businesses looking to develop in Asia, particularly those looking to do business with China.  Vietnam has also invested heavily in education which has made their population competitive in math and science.  Vietnam has done such a good job of managing and growing their economy that they are actually the second fastest growing economy in the world.  They have also encouraged competition among their provinces which has given the country a greater variety in valuable industries.  The obstacles that Vietnam faces into becoming an even more powerful economy are lack of domestic supply chains, meaning they have to import goods to sustain their own population, and a one-party government that is unstable.  Without changes to this, they will struggle to become a major world economy.  However, they show that it is possible for small, developing countries to grow their economies and gain the status of being a developed country.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 3, 2018 12:10 AM
(Southeast Asia) This article argues the importance of Vietnam as an upcoming Asian Tiger. Vietnam has the second highest growth rate in the world, leading to a current population of 92.7 million. By reducing trading regulations, Vietnam is a cheap substitute for hosting companies in China. Each region of the country was stimulated to have different economies, causing a variety of services to Vietnam. Additionally, Vietnam spends a large budget on education in order to produce reliable workers for the economy. However, the dictatorial government, state owned businesses, and China's dominance of international markets poses a problem for its ascension to a highly developed nation.
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A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war

A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

If Pyongyang is as bent on war as it wants us to believe, why is it keeping the inter-Korean Kaesong industrial complex open?


brielle blais's insight:
This article showcases the importance of positive relations between countries and how it impacts the political geography. In this case, it is between North Korea and South Korea. North Korea has sent signals of starting a war for a long time now, so many times that people can now call its bluff. It is mostly because of the Kaesong Industrial Complex that employs both North and South Koreans. It is an incentive for both countries to remain friendly, if not, at least civil. 
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Jusvic Dublois & Cooper Baddley's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:06 PM

 This falls under politics. This article says that North Korea is probley bluffing on going to war with us. They are saying that why would you keep the inter korean industrial complex open if they where. This is in Pyongyang North Korea

Anthony morales's curator insight, October 28, 2014 12:39 PM

korea wants to start a war but are bluffing because they are leaving one of there main nueclar factories open and not closed off 

 This is a part of PERSIA by this ties in with economy by how Kim Jong lil has to decide what happens in this country

AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, November 5, 2014 1:32 PM

North Korea War

 

The North Korean leader is showing that he is pro war but the actions that he is taking lead us to believe that he is "All Talk". Does he really feel that war is the best option at this point or does he just want to seem like he is the best.  

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Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off

Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
The BBC's Celia Hatton finds out why one restaurant in Shanghai is serving up American-style Chinese food
brielle blais's insight:
This article shows how cultures can bleed into other countries, blend together, and in this case eventually find its way back to the country in which it came. Chinese food is a lot different than the westernized Chinese food that came to be in America after the first Chinese immigrants. People of China are experiencing the American twist on their food, even if it is almost completely different in some cases. It is cool to think about the fact that the owners of the restaurant have to import American ingredients to China to make authentic American Chinese food. 
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ORIGINAL: SUB-SAHARAN

ORIGINAL: SUB-SAHARAN | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
Can Africa's fertile farmland feed the world?
brielle blais's insight:
The hundreds of fertile acres of land in sub-saharan Africa is a long hidden blessing. A country already experiencing a steady economic growth at 5% a year is now in the world of becoming the new Breadbasket. Corn, soybeans, wheat and rice can all be grown in this area. It is enough to feed the local people but also export food which is good for the economy as well. This shows how a lands geography can help both the people, the economy, and ultimately the world. 
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African dams linked to over one million malaria cases annually

African dams linked to over one million malaria cases annually | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Over one million people in sub-Saharan Africa will contract malaria this year because they live near a large dam, according to a new study which, for the first time, has correlated the location of large dams with the incidence of malaria and quantified impacts across the region. The study finds that construction of an expected 78 major new dams in sub-Saharan Africa over the next few years will lead to an additional 56,000 malaria cases annually."

brielle blais's insight:
Physical geographies can affect a lot of things. Areas close to dams draw in mosquitos that pass malaria to bitten people. While the dams are built to help the development of Africa, helping economic growth, maintaining agriculture, etc, the development won't be sustained if the population can't be sustained because everyone is dying from malaria. 
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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 3:59 PM

I hope they have the shots for immunization against malaria.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 10:39 PM

This is a great article on the side affects of man made infrastructure. While dams can be used in positive ways they can also have negative effects like this that probably were not even considered.

Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 24, 2018 10:09 PM
Dams are often built to provide hydroelectric power or to prevent flooding, which makes them beneficial.  But in some parts of the world, they cause more problems than they solve.  Dams lead to stagnant water, which can mean disaster in tropical and subtropical climates such as most of sub-Saharan Africa.  These climates, combined with huge amounts of stagnant water, mean an explosion of mosquitoes, which carry such diseases as malaria.
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Labor unrest in Cameroon after clashes over language discrimination

Labor unrest in Cameroon after clashes over language discrimination | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
In Cameroon, unrest in minority English-speaking regions over discrimination by majority French speakers is still simmering after violent clashes with police claimed at least four lives.

 

English-speakers have been protesting since Monday (11/21/2016) against what they see as their "second-class citizen status" and attempts to marginalize them in the west African nation. Eight of Cameroon's ten regions are largely Francophone, but two regions, North West and South West Cameroon are English-speaking. English-speaking teachers complain that French-speaking counterparts are being increasingly deployed in English schools, despite differences in the curricula and teaching systems.

 

Tags: language, Cameroon, Africa, culture.

brielle blais's insight:
A nation's language is incredibly important to it's geography. In Cameroon, there are mostly French speaking citizens, however, there are still many English speakers.The differences are seen as more French speakers are getting jobs than English. They see this as discrimination. A huge problem is also dealing with important jobs such as in the courtroom. People who cannot understand each other cannot decide on things together. Things like this cause a lot of conflict in countries. 
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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 9, 2018 10:05 AM
The study of language in a population is always fascinating.  In this instance this one is very fascinating especially for someone that is in English speaker from America. While most of the world that we know it speaks some kind of English or tries to bend to using English for business terms or what not it was quite the headline to see this. In Cameroon they have both French and English speakers, however French speakers heavily outweigh English speakers. 8 of the 10 counties in the country are French dominated, however they are trying to takeover the English speaking areas as well. The hostility has been built up as teachers claim that many of their jobs are now going to French speakers in the schools and other are arguing that there should be English speakings judges in English speaking areas. It is so strange to see a backlash versus the English language in this country and also to see such a heavy division.  Maybe its because we live in a world in which we believe the English world dominates, but seeing people discriminated against for speaking English comes shocking and  maybe can open our eyes and view what we are doing in this country or in other parts of the world. We read this article and believe that something needs to be done, but what do we do in this country or other parts of the world to help other people that speak different languages? Do we have Spanish speaking teachers in heavy Spanish areas? In cities that have a high Haitian population do we hire teachers and judges that speak Creole? Pieces like this should help us reflect on our own situation and always reflect on how the population of areas can eventually effect the social and cultural issues. 
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 31, 2018 4:05 PM
This is a good example of the long term affects of colonialism even after independence.  Teachers in English speaking sections of Cameroon complained as more French speaking teachers began taking jobs in their regions.  The English speakers complained because the curriculum the French speakers were teaching is different.  Lawyers in the English speaking regions also raised the issue that the judges and other government officials were only speaking French, making their jobs difficult to do.  What’s more interesting is that the constitution of the country recognizes both English and French as official languages.  But since a majority of citizens speak French, those that speak English feel alienated and like they are being treated as second-class citizens.  The federal government also operates almost exclusively in French.  The long term build up of this tension has caused those in the English speaking regions to revolt, unfortunately they did it violently.  The opposition party in the country has taken advantage of this in order to help their party by claiming that they will help incite change if voted into office.  The party in power spun the situation to say that those revolting were being paid by foreign powers.  The effects of colonialism can be devastating and harm people long after colonizers leave.  This is a country where there are two official languages, yet the majority has been able to gang up on the minority.  It’s unfortunate because people cannot be happy in their own jobs or daily lives and the government and their fellow citizens are ignoring them.
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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

 

While many are leery of GMOs (with good reasons linked to health), it is important to recognize that there is society value to agricultural research that works on improving yields.  This article would be a good "other side of the coin" resource to share when discussing GMOs.   

brielle blais's insight:
Phosphorus-deficiant soil cannot grow crops. Without ample amounts of agriculture, a countries economy cannot be stimulated enough to be successful, or worse, not feed it's people on a local level. This all depends on a countries physical geography.The land, however, can be change through the use of a gene that boots root growth. With this help, populations and the economy can be sustained.
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India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
India is to divert water from major rivers like the Brahmaputra and the Ganges to deal with severe drought, a senior minister tells the BBC.
brielle blais's insight:
Drought is a factor of the physical geography of an area that is in trouble. India is heavily depended on monsoon rains, and for two years have no received what they normally do, and 330 million people are affected by it. The country is planning to divert different rivers to solve the issue. "The government says the scheme will irrigate 35,000 hectares of land and generate 34,000 megawatts of electricity." This will exponentially help those dealing with the water crisis, but also help with other thing such as electricity. 
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Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 22, 2018 1:07 PM
As everyone knows, water is key. We usually talk about water in geography has a way to export/import or for key military purposes. Here we are talking about survival and certain states within in India (29 to be exact) that were suffering through a drought and whose rivers had been completely dried up. India has tried a new plan to try to get water to these areas, by diverting water from there other rivers to these states. This is an interesting way to try to deal with this problem, however is it really feasible to do this?  Would this eventually causes problems in the areas in which we are taking the water from? Also this would be very expensive and India , who is still a growing country,  could hurt them economically for years to come. No one has said this will work and while yes, its horrible to see what has happen to these areas, but is this just a quick fix. What would the plan be for a future drought, is there anyway to come up with a better plan? Possibly will these people need to move in the future. Our rivers and lands are constantly changing so as people we might have to move away from areas that which were once habitable, but now may not be. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 2018 12:26 PM
Extreme drought combined with inefficient agricultural practices and the depletion of groundwater resources have creates a water crisis in India. However the solution to the drought seems poorly planned and likely to fail. There is no evidence showing that a massive water diversion project like this will succeed in alleviating the effects of such a massive drought. 
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ORIGINAL: MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

ORIGINAL: MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
A volcano beneath the Red Sea has given Earth a New Year's gift: a new island off the coast of Yemen.
brielle blais's insight:
This article shows how the constant moving of the fault line in the Red Sea can cause new islands to show up. This is how the physical geography of a place can also affect the economic geography, as the island is now a possible tourist spot. Tourism sparks the increase of a countries economy, supporting them even more.
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ORIGINAL: AUSTRALIA 

ORIGINAL: AUSTRALIA  | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it
A significant correction must be made by the end of the year for navigation technology to keep working smoothly.
brielle blais's insight:
I found this post very interesting because Australia has moved a whole four feet and nine inches since 1994. This is causing trouble with some navigational systems. This is why it is crucial to have accurate data on a countries geographic location and their actual physical geography as well, in this case, the speed in which the tectonic plates are moving. In the case of Australia, it is moving about about  2.7 inches a year northward with a slight clockwise rotation on the Indo-Australian Plate.
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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Digital Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "

brielle blais's insight:
This post shows how this physical geography and climate of a country can impact who lives where, and how crowded the actual livable places can be. The land in the yellow is very hot, dry, and mostly desert and rugged. It would be very difficult for anyone to actually live in this area, due do land that cannot be used for any agriculture, most likely very little water sources, and just plain hot. This means the density of livable cities is very high, giving Australia a unique demographic. 
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Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 2018 4:13 PM
This distribution of Australia's population should come to no surprise to people who have a vague idea of the continent's geography. The coastal areas are by far preferable to the desert areas of the continent's interior. A good example of how geography impacts population density and where people decide to live.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 10:20 PM
The population of Australia is highly concentrated at the coast. Only about two percent of the population lives in the yellow shaded area on the image present in the article. The reason for the middle of Australia being so lightly populated is because the harsh climates. Where most people do not live the climate resembles the Sahara desert, which is very dry, and lacks rainfall. While the coastal areas where most of the population is concentrated resembles climates like Brazil, California, and India. These climates that most people live are not as harsh on the human and better for agriculture, cattle and port cities are known to be economically more powerful and populated. Since they access to the sea is so imperative these days.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 4:38 PM
The area often referred to as the "Outback" of Australia is one of the most sparsely populated areas on the planet. Due to the harsh environment and lack of resources not many people live their at all with the exceptions being some scientist, anthropologist, and native aboriginal tribes. This environment to many   seems like a horrible, desolate place. Hence why it was a great setting for Mad Max to help Illustrate the gravity and desperateness of the situation. To people that know the land better there is a lot there and a vast array of species only found in the Outback.