Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification
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Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification
Avatars,  Virtual Worlds, AR, VR, AI, Gamification
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Someday, Robot Artists May Have to Explain Their Creations to Us

Someday, Robot Artists May Have to Explain Their Creations to Us | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Physicist and author Arthur Miller shares his thoughts on the future of artificial intelligence, art, and what it means for machines to be creative.
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Science Fiction Prototypes –

Science Fiction Prototypes – | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Science Fiction Prototypes (SFPs) are works of fiction, intended to spur individuals to think about potential future digital / cyber capabilities that could effect us.  They are plausible science f…
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The Future of Augmented Reality & Blockchain Technology «

The Future of Augmented Reality & Blockchain Technology « | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
If there is a major blind spot in the AR space in 2019, it's the impact that blockchain technology will eventually have on the software distributed in AR clouds. For the uninitiated, the quickest way to describe blockchain technology is as a method of assigning unique attributes to digital assets using cryptography, and those assets are distributed on a (usually) decentralized, (usually) public ledger (database) called a blockchain.
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Meron Gribetz: A glimpse of the future through an augmented reality headset 

Meron Gribetz: A glimpse of the future through an augmented reality headset  | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
What if technology could connect us more deeply with our surroundings instead of distracting us from the real world? With the Meta 2, an augmented reality headset that makes it possible for users to see, grab and move holograms just like physical objects, Meron Gribetz hopes to extend our senses through a more natural machine. Join Gribetz as he takes the TED stage to demonstrate the reality-shifting Meta 2 for the first time. (Featuring Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson)
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What Is a Robot?

What Is a Robot? | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Introducing "HardWIRED: Welcome to the Robotic Future," a new video series in which we explore the many fascinating machines that are transforming society.
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Artificial Intelligence, the Future of Work, and Implications for Education

Artificial Intelligence, the Future of Work, and Implications for Education | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
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The Future of Creativity and Innovation is Gamification: Gabe Zichermann at TEDxVilnius - Video

Gabe Zichermann is the chair of GSummit where top gamification experts across industries gather to share knowledge and insight about customer & employee enga...
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The Irony of Gamification

The Irony of Gamification | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
This appeared in issue 3 of the British Council's IED magazinePerhaps I’m
living in an echo chamber. On examination, my PLN does appear to be
worryingly comprised of mostly like-minded peers and my RSS aggregators do
a pretty decent job of trimming the fat by carefully curating the news and
articles I encounter. Even taking that into consideration, over time
I found myself secretly hoping that gamifiction was just a faddish
neologism, but if it is, it’s proving to be an extremely stubborn one.

Don’t get me wrong, I love games. Board games, word games, card games,
pervasive games, digital games — I study them, play them and have even
designed a few. I also frequently use games in my classes. But we’re not
talking about games here, we’re talking about “ifying” something that is
not a game. To “ify” something (apologies to any hardline grammarians out
there for contorting a suffix into a verb), is, according to the Cambridge
online dictionary, “to cause an increase in the stated quality”. So, to
gamify is to make a non-game more game-like by suffusing it with game-like
qualities.

It’s not hard to understand why one would want to do this, especially in
the field of education. Games are fun, intensely engaging and highly
motivational systems. They can also be extremely complex, challenging and
rewarding experiences. Modern video games can often take tens or even
hundreds of hours to complete. They involve actively acquiring new skills,
making difficult choices, digesting huge amounts of contextually situated
information and repeatedly applying critical problem solving skills to
overcome what may at first appear to be overwhelming obstacles. Gamers do
all of these things routinely, voluntarily and enthusiastically. Many games
are also extremely collaborative and social, with communities of practice
spanning thousands of blogs, wikis and forums produced by and dedicated to
players who want to share what they know and learn from others. What
teacher wouldn’t want to imbue their lessons with more of these
qualities? This is the siren-song appeal of gamification.

As with most things though, the proof of the pudding is to be found in the
eating. And, to risk stretching the metaphor to breaking point, with the
pudding of gamification, the problem lies in the ingredients used, the
cooking technique applied and the chef on duty. Examples of gamified
systems can be found all around us. Department stores and supermarkets have
long co-opted the psychological power of the points and rewards game
mechanic to promote customer loyalty and increased sales. Fast food
restaurants routinely offer tokens and scratch cards which can be traded
for fries and burgers and more recently location-based social networks like
Gowalla and Fouresquare, which allow you to “check in” to specific
real-world locations and earn virtual badges, have been used as promotional
tools by shops and restaurants who offer discounts to frequent visitors.
Arookoo, and many similar mobile apps, even turn the act of walking into a
game by rewarding users with points and badges for the distance they cover
while being tracked by the GPS in their phones.

Schools and universities all over the world are jumping on the gamification
wagon to seemingly great effect. Back in 2010 I heard a radio interview
with the headmaster of a school here in northern Portugal. They were in the
second term of a trial which involved dishing out points, badges and
rewards to their students for everything from good behaviour to test
results and attendance. Classes were pitted against each other to
accumulate the highest number of points and win rewards such as trips and
prizes. This encouraged students to put pressure on anyone who appeared to
be slacking, so as to boost the class average. The headmaster was enthused
by the project and cited bucket loads of statistics revealing attendance
improvements and test scores.

Another apparent “win” for gamification was the focus of an article in
Forbes magazine earlier this year. The article, entitled “Education Meets
World Of Warcraft” describes a polytechnic teacher who begins the academic
year by informing his students that they all have an F, quickly calming the
ensuing panic by adding that they can “level up”. According to the article
he then, “...divides the class into small groups called “guilds,” which
complete quests such as taking tests and making presentations to earn
points and then advance to a new level. At the end of the course, he
determines the grade by points and skill level.” Like the Portuguese
experiment, gamifying the course led to significant performance
improvements: “Ever since I turned education into a game”, he says, “the
average letter grade in the class went from a C to a B, and attendance is
almost perfect.”

The thing is, although many games use such points and rewards systems to
track player progress, they are only the most superficial components and
not fundamental to the experience of what a game is. They are but one of
many ways of providing feedback to players about how close they are to
achieving their goals. Of course, feedback is essential to learning as it
helps you to keep on track and enables you to try out new strategies and
see how well they work. Games of all kinds are great at providing
immediate, frequent and intense feedback in multiple ways which are not
always possible or practical in traditional learning environments. This
rich feedback may be in the form of audio, video, haptics, social
interaction or narrative progression among others. Furthermore, because the
feedback is usually immediate, it is strongly situated in the context in
which the action took place. Games are complex systems, a point which seems
to currently be ignored by the majority of gamification proponents.

With most gamified systems and processes the feedback is provided in the
form of a simple, superficial layer of points, badges and other rewards
that are not contextually integral to the activity itself. In the field of
education, this is compounded by the fact that we have already introduced
such a feedback layer in the form of test scores, grade averages and
certificates, so in essence we are rewarding the rewards, much in the same
way as parents who give material gifts in return for As. I’ll leave that
argument for another time.

Over the short term this approach may lead to measurable outcomes as
students make an effort to perform better in order to achieve better
results, or more attendance points. The unintended consequence of this is
that it frames learning as being an action of accumulation, about gaining
or having either material or virtual capital. The rhetoric is that of the
age-old carrot and stick metaphor in which learners are conditioned to act
and behave in certain ways in order to gain certain rewards. This is the
classical operant conditioning model which externalizes motivation through
the promise of extrinsic reward.

Students want to “have a degree” and “get a good grade” rather than be
 learners and it then becomes logical for them to ask questions such as
“will this be in the test?”, in order to avoid wasting effort on unrewarded
content (for more on the whole having vs being debate I highly recommend
Fromm’s “To Have or to Be”). This attitude is precisely the opposite of
what we should be encouraging if we want to produce a society of
self-motivated and reflective lifelong learners. To make matters worse,
although renaming classes as “guilds”, grades as “levels” and better marks
as “leveling up” may manipulate learners into modifying their behaviour, it
does so by reinforcing and perpetuating an anachronistic industrial model
of education through concealment and thwarting intrinsic motivation.
Prepackaged web 2.0 services like Class Dojo promise to enable teachers to:

"Create an engaging classroom in minutes” by providing “instant visual
notifications for your students (‘Well done Josh! +1 for teamwork!’) with a
whole host of game mechanics: think level-ups, badges and achievements to
unlock, in-classroom games, avatars and leaderboards.

Similar gamification platforms are popping up every day, their brightly
coloured, cutesy vector graphics thinly concealing the underlying rhetoric
of increasing reward dependency and undermining intrinsic motivation.

Dewey expresses this nicely in chapter seven of The School and Society:

If there is not an inherent attracting power in the material, then
(according to his temperament and training, and the precedents and
expectations of the school) the teacher will either attempt to surround the
material with foreign attractiveness, making a bid or offering a bribe for
attention by "making the lesson interesting"; or else will resort to
counterirritants (low marks, threats of non-promotion, staying after
school, personal disapprobation, expressed in a great variety of ways,
naggings, continuous calling upon the child to "pay attention," etc.); or,
probably, will use some of both means.

...But the attention thus gained is never more than partial, or divided;
and it always remains dependent upon something external —hence, when the
attraction ceases or the pressure lets up, there is little or no gain in
inner or intellectual control.

Such instrumental learning may be easy to implement and convenient for
administrators to tidily quantify into grades and statistics, but we need
real change in education, not merely a shift in perceptions. Games can help
us achieve this if we respect and embrace their complexity and refrain from
stripping them of their intrinsic power to motivate and engage learners on
multiple levels. Educators can and should use games and game mechanics in
different contexts, but they should do so reflectively and unravel their
underlying rhetoric. Games can serve as excellent examples of how active
and stimulating learning environments can be created for the purpose of
learning, as good games already embody many of the characteristics of good
learning principles (see James Gee for more on this and John Hunter’s World
Peace Game for a real-world example of a gamified learning program that
embraces the rich complexity of game dynamics).

So the problem of gamification is, somewhat ironically, that in the
majority of its current implementations, it is not game-like enough. By
overlooking the depth and breadth of the potential games have to empower
and motivate learners and create meaningful experiences, and instead
employing only a myopic and superficial game mechanic,
popular gamification is doing a disservice to both learners and educators.
Completing tasks in order to achieve an extrinsic reward is more akin to
how we describe work in its most alienating form. One of the many things
commonly missing from gamification is playful freedom. Playful freedom
allows learners to take risks and test new strategies in an environment
protected within the “magic circle” of gameplay, that is safe from real
world consequences. An environment in which failing at challenging tasks is
as integral a part of learning as succeeding, and the reward is the
learning that takes place between the two, and what that skill or knowledge
might empower you to do or be in the future. 
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Playing Games: Do Game Consoles have a Positive Impact on Girls’ Learning Outcomes and Motivation?

Playing Games: Do Game Consoles have a Positive Impact on Girls’ Learning Outcomes and Motivation? | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
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Abstract

Games based learning is currently a hotly debated topic in education and is a fertile field of study (Holmes, 2011; Abrams, 2009). Many schools are exploring ways in which games can be embedded into the curriculum, to enhance learning through deeper engagement and higher levels of motivation (Miller & Robertson, 2010). This paper explores the use of game consoles to support learning for young students (ages 8-11) and evaluates their recent success in primary education. Over time game consoles and video games have been portrayed as a male oriented technology. This research investigated the current use of game consoles in learning and how it might positively affect a child’s learning and motivation, but focused solely on female students’ experiences. In the study we investigated the research question: ‘Do game consoles have a positive impact on girls’ learning and motivation?’ A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to girls in Key Stage 2 (n=49) across three schools that have already incorporated game consoles into their curriculum. The study found that game consoles and video games can have a positive impact on girls’ learning and motivation and are key themes that have been raised by teachers. However, due to several limitations in this research some issues were not fully addressed, and we identify some future areas for research.

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Gamification: why playing games could be the future of training and e-learning

Gamification: why playing games could be the future of training and e-learning | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Gamification has become an increasingly important element within the training industry, one that can often mean the difference between success and failure. In recent years, looking critically at th...
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Chip Peters's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:41 AM

An excellent article - provides foundational insight into the trend sweeping the industry.

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Stuff From The Future - What is Augmented Reality?

What is an augmented reality? Are we already living in one? Join Jonathan Strickland as he explores the technology used to augment our world and discusses wh...
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Using 3D Virtual Worlds to Improve Outcomes and Engagement

Using 3D Virtual Worlds to Improve Outcomes and Engagement | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
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The Open Wonderland Foundation, launched in 2010, provides an open source platform for developers who are interested in building 3D virtual applications, particularly those designed to be used in educational settings. The platform is based on technology that was originally developed at Sun Microsystems to meet the specific needs of Sun employees. Jeanne Heston recently had an opportunity to catch up with Nicole Yankelovich, who led the platform’s development team since the very beginning, to learn more about the set of needs that inspired its development, applications in the education community, and her thoughts on how the technology will be leveraged for education purposes in the future.

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Fun is the Future: Mastering Gamification

Google Tech Talk October 26, 2010 Presented by Gabe Zichermann. ABSTRACT Gamification is fundamentally rewriting the rules of engagement for product design a...
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EdTechReview (@etr_in)'s curator insight, March 26, 2013 3:46 AM

Fun is the future :) And we can say future is fun :)

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Futurism

Futurism

Futurism ( Italian: Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century. It emphasised speed, technology, youth, violence, and objects such as the car, the airplane, and the industrial city. Its key figures were the Italians Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Gino Severini, Giacomo Balla, and Luigi Russolo.

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Hyper-Reality

Hyper-Reality | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Hyper-Reality is a concept film by Keiichi Matsuda. It presents a provocative and kaleidoscopic new vision of the future, where physical and virtual realities have merged, and the city is saturated in media.
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What Robots Can Teach Us About Being Human 

Over the next few months, Michelle R. Weise will be devoting her column to explaining one small thing about the future of work. Here’s the first of he
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The Future of Augmented Reality Ain’t Pokemon Go

The Future of Augmented Reality Ain’t Pokemon Go | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Five years back, Google Glass’s famous launch video trained us to think of augmented reality as a flat translucence. It would be a bunch of wee announcements slapped on our field of view like…
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 3, 2018 10:00 AM

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Collaboration in Augmented Reality

Collaboration in Augmented Reality | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique coll
Ana Cristina Pratas's insight:

Abstract

 

Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they interact with, or a user can annotate the live video view of a remote worker, enabling them to collaborate at a distance. The overall goal is to augment the face-to-face collaborative experience, or to enable remote people to feel that they are virtually co-located. In this special issue on collaboration in augmented reality, we begin with the visions of science fiction authors of future technologies that might significantly improve collaboration, then introduce research articles which describe progress towards these visions, finally we outline a research agenda discussing the work still to be done.

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Reconceptualising gamification: Play and pedagogy - Digital Culture & Education

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Abstract


Gamification is a complex and controversial concept. It has been both embraced as a marketing and education revolution, and dismissed as practice of exploitation. Contested within the debate around gamification has been the very concept of what a game is, what the core mechanics of games are, and whether gamification truly mobilises these core mechanics. This paper will challenge the foundation of this debate through reconceptualising gamification not as a simple set of techniques and mechanics, but as a pedagogic heritage, an alternative framework for training and shaping participant behaviour that has at its core the concepts of entertainment and engagement.  In doing so it will recontextualise current practices of gamification into a longer and deeper history, and suggest potential pathways for more sophisticated gamification in the future.

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David Crookall's curator insight, January 20, 2015 3:02 PM

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David Crookall's curator insight, January 22, 2015 10:39 AM

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Julia Wagner's curator insight, January 24, 2015 10:57 AM

Awesome stuff for using gamification well.

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Why Games May Become the Education of the Future

Why Games May Become the Education of the Future | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Parents and teachers are often wary of letting kids spend time playing video games, and would rather they spend time playing outside or reading. But a number of game developers are introducing exciting mods of popular games like Minecraft and SimCity into the classroom and re-imagining how video games can support traditional educational objectives, like learning about ecology, math, and physics.…
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 9, 2014 7:23 PM

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Amy Radley's curator insight, October 16, 2014 6:06 AM

It is imperative that we get kids excited to learn these days, and games may be one of the most effective ways to do it. Teachers are now keen to inspire children to take their learning home with them too - perhaps a math based game they have been playing in class is so fun that they want to continue playing at home? This extends their learning time to outside of school hours - and doesn't seem like a chore! Homework in the form of online quizzes and tasks which can be digitally marked instantly makes a better experience for kids and teachers! Less marking and instant gratification for students! 

Ecole Wifaq Rabat's curator insight, March 14, 2016 6:32 PM

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Futurescape: Connecting the Mind to the Internet : Video

Futurescape: Connecting the Mind to the Internet : Video | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
In the future, there will be no barrier between your thoughts, your imagination, and the world that you see.
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The Future of Gamification: From Behaviour Management to Functional Games

The Future of Gamification: From Behaviour Management to Functional Games | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
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James Paul Gee on Grading with Games

An Arizona State University professor sees a bright future for video games in the learning process - in and out of school. See more about the future of educa...
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Designing the Future of #Games, Learning, and Assessment

Designing the Future of #Games, Learning, and Assessment | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
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Meet Zoe, the virtual assistant of the future

Meet Zoe, the virtual assistant of the future | Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification | Scoop.it
Virtual assistants could become a familiar sight in offices and on home gadgets after researchers at Cambridge University unveil the first interactive digital face capable of displaying a range of emotions.
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