Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
12.3K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Susan Myburgh from 21st Century Teacher Librarians and School Libraries
onto Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Scoop.it!

27 Things Your Teacher Librarian Does

27 Things Your Teacher Librarian Does | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

We love Teacher Librarians! This infographic is created by Mia MacMeekin.


Via Glenda Morris
Sharla Shults's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:23 PM

The Librarian...the most diversified teacher of all!

Christine Margocs's curator insight, June 5, 2013 8:14 PM

Great for the library website!

Ana María Correa's curator insight, February 25, 2014 10:59 AM

A really lovely infographic that brings it all home...

Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Examines the connectivity possible for global knowledge participative creation and sharing.
Curated by Susan Myburgh
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Major Publishers Take Down Paywalls for Coronavirus Coverage – Adweek

Major Publishers Take Down Paywalls for Coronavirus Coverage – Adweek | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
An interesting decision as some organizations have recently instituted them.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

COVID-19 Resources for Museums and Cultural Organizations

COVID-19 Resources for Museums and Cultural Organizations | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Updated 4:16 pm March 31, 2020 Museums, galleries, and cultural organizations across the province are currently dealing with a host of challenges stemming from the COVID-19 outbreak.In partnership with Greater Vancouver Professional Theatre Alliance, and BC Alliance for Arts + Culture, the BCMA is...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library Harms Authors

Internet Archive’s National Emergency Library Harms Authors | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
IA is using a global crisis to advance a copyright ideology that has been legally invalidated and that offends most authors. It has misrepresented the nature and legality of the project through a deceptive publicity campaign.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Biometrics and digital ID in Africa this week: politics, ecommerce, Covid-19 biometric capture bans

Biometrics and digital ID in Africa this week: politics, ecommerce, Covid-19 biometric capture bans | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Covid-19 continues to impact biometric systems across Africa as reports highlight the political angle being applied to the selective bans of biometric capture.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

WorldCat.org: The World's Largest Library Catalog

WorldCat.org: The World's Largest Library Catalog | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Find what you want in a library near you with WorldCat, a global catalog of library collections.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Curated Online WH Resources – World History Association

Curated Online WH Resources – World History Association | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
With the sudden requirement that instructors around the world pivot to online instruction, the need for free, high-quality digital teaching resources is greater than ever. Now available in beta-form, the World History Commons is an open education resource (OER) developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) in partnership with the World History Association; it features a wide variety of materials related to world history. Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, World History Commons revitalizes and enhances widely-used resources from World History Matters, the award-winning collection of world history websites developed by the over the past twenty years, as well as the Global History Reader, a collaboration between scholars at Monash University (Australia) and Warwick University (UK). Over the next year and a half we will add more materials to the site with the goal of introducing new humanities scholarship to researchers, teachers, and students. World History Commons is organized into 4 main sections The Methods section presents scholarly overviews of key questions and issues in world history (e.g., “What is global history?” and “The problem of time”) designed especially for scholars, teachers, and students who are new to world history. This is especially critical given the many voices and disciplines involved in world history, a field that represents multiple approaches to substantive debates about periodization, geographical units, and the role of national and local histories in global stories. This section also provides practical guidance in research methods and annotated bibliographies that offer scholarly resources for digging more deeply. The Teaching section introduces commonly taught topics in world history along with selected primary and secondary sources, discussion questions, teaching strategies, differentiation, interactive activities, and annotated bibliographies. These resources bring scholarly expertise to the classroom, including content and pedagogical strategies designed for world history. The Sources section presents primary sources from world and global history, including images, objects, texts, and digitally-born materials, along with introductions, strategies for analysis, and guiding questions. Examples include a contract signed between the Dutch East India Company and a group of Japanese mercenaries, which teachers and students can, with context, use to shed light on the race for spices and the first instance of corporate genocide. The Reviews section provide a curated guide to the best online content, large and small, in world history through website reviews from the perspective of a world history teacher. This includes robust yet focused archives in multiple languages as well as experimental data visualizations and interactives, such as Sejarah Nusantara, a digital archive for international researchers studying the history of Indonesia and maritime Southeast Asia developed by the National Archives in Indonesia (Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia) or Visualising Angkor, a 3D model of Angkor Wat based on recent archaeological findings where students can explore temples, village life, and surrounding areas. Reviews address scholarly and pedagogical issues, including how to guide student exploration and contextualize resources, as well as questions of language and translation and larger thematic connections. We at RRCHNM are committed to developing free and sustainable resources in the area of history education. It is our hope that World History Commons provides a resource that teachers of world history can rely on for many years to come. By Nate Sleeter Research Assistant Professor, George Mason University & WHA member
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Which museums have the biggest social media followings? | The Art Newspaper

Which museums have the biggest social media followings? | The Art Newspaper | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Increasingly, the digital sphere is a new frontier for institutions to battle it out for the attention of culture-seekers...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

In a time of crisis, a call for better information citizenship

In a time of crisis, a call for better information citizenship | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The remainder of 2020 will be challenging for Americans as we seek to be better informed about the November 2020 elections and the coronavirus pandemic that is impacting our politics, economy, communities, and families.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Ten Lasting Impacts Of The Virus

Ten Lasting Impacts Of The Virus | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
We’re all wondering how to survive the virus: how to stay alive, and also solvent. Assuming we manage that, what will be its lasting impacts?
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Invitation to participate in the Youth Global Online Consultation –

Invitation to participate in the Youth Global Online Consultation – | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Geneva, 23 March 2020; In line with the International Telecommunication Union's (ITU's) mandate to contribute to the inclusion and empowerment of youth in the digital society as noted in Resolution 198 (Rev.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Coronavirus adds fuel to the "Digital Dollar" debate

Coronavirus adds fuel to the "Digital Dollar" debate | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Early coronavirus relief bills included language promoting public, digital banking infrastructure. Do we need it?
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

ImpACT joins 100 organisations to call on governments to avoid creating digital age of ‘Big Brother’ as world fights COVID-19

ImpACT joins 100 organisations to call on governments to avoid creating digital age of ‘Big Brother’ as world fights COVID-19 | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
ImpACT International for Human Rights Policies - a London-based think tank concerned with policies of states and businesses...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Myburgh from COMPARE RISK COMMUNICATION
Scoop.it!

The Eight Categories of Media Bias

The Eight Categories of Media Bias | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

The 8 Violations of Media Objectivity

  1. Misleading definitions: Prejudicing readers through language.
  2. Imbalanced reporting: Distorting news through disproportionate coverage.
  3. Opinions disguised as news: Inappropriately injecting opinion or interpretation into coverage.
  4. Lack of context: Withholding a frame of reference for readers.
  5. Selective omission: Reporting certain events over others, or withholding key details.
  6. Using true facts to draw false conclusions: Infecting news with flawed logic.
  7. Distortion of facts: Getting the facts wrong.
  8. Lack of transparency: Failing to be open and accountable to readers.

Via Emilio Mordini
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Ten Museums You Can Virtually Visit | Smart News

Ten Museums You Can Virtually Visit | Smart News | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Museums are closing their doors amid the coronavirus crisis, but many offer digital exhibitions visitors can browse from the comfort of home...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Digital healthcare’s next shift? Voice interfaces

Digital healthcare’s next shift? Voice interfaces | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
As payers, providers and other health organizations increasingly implement voice interfaces, it will be essential to reduce barriers to engagement.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Is the Covid-19 Crisis a Watershed Moment for Library E-books?

Is the Covid-19 Crisis a Watershed Moment for Library E-books? | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Why the rapid shift to digital library services necessitated by the Covid-19 crisis could help chart a new, more productive course for the digital library market long term.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Digital art guide to beat coronavirus closures

Digital art guide to beat coronavirus closures | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
From virtual exhibitions and livestreamed concerts to online art auctions, this is our guide to how art is going digital in the age of COVID-19.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

The Art World Goes Virtual | Frieze

The Art World Goes Virtual | Frieze | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
With physical spaces on lockdown, exhibitions and sales rooms are migrating online. Will they ever come back?
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Digital divide: Rural broadband in the time of coronavirus

Digital divide: Rural broadband in the time of coronavirus | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Not everyone can telework during the coronavirus pandemic, because they lack reliable broadband. Many who lack broadband live in rural areas.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Virtual art and craft exhibitions to enjoy while isolated - Crafts Council

Virtual art and craft exhibitions to enjoy while isolated - Crafts Council | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
We are the national development agency for the contemporary crafts in the UK.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

The Design Museum’s awesome new series of digital events stars creators like Camille Walala

The Design Museum’s awesome new series of digital events stars creators like Camille Walala | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Are you sharing your lockdown with a dangerously bored child (or adult)? The Design Museum’s new calendar of online events might help restore some sanity.Today...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Digital rights in Africa: advocates must team up to consolidate gains - Report

Digital rights in Africa: advocates must team up to consolidate gains - Report | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Civil society groups pushing for increased respect for digital rights by governments it said needed to better liaise and regularize their advocacy in seeking the best interest of Africans online.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Digital Resources for Libraries

Digital Resources for Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
A comprehensive list of digital resources for libraries, including categories for Early Years, Young People, Adults and Vulnerable People.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

How can help you reach audiences online? –

How can  help you reach audiences online? – | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
What are some of the ways Museum Crush can support you to share your collections online and engage with audiences ? Museum Crush is Culture24's collaborative storytelling platform, which forms part of our work as an Arts Council funded Sector...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Myburgh
Scoop.it!

Library Stat of the Week #12: Pre-pandemic, eLending from public libraries lagged well-behind traditional lending. But in Denmark, eBooks already represented 1 in 7 book loans « Library Policy and ...

Library Stat of the Week #12: Pre-pandemic, eLending from public libraries lagged well-behind traditional lending. But in Denmark, eBooks already represented 1 in 7 book loans « Library Policy and ... | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
With libraries around their world forced to close their doors to the public, there have been major spikes in demand for digital content, and in particular eBooks. Of course, libraries globally have been doing what they can to develop their digital offer for users. Digital tools and materials offer a great possibility not only to provide access to more diverse content, but also to support users in remote areas or who have mobility challenges. At the same time, they have faced challenges connected with the failure of copyright laws to keep up with the digital age, and the fact that markets have not really adapted. A long-term challenge for libraries will be to ensure that if ever such a crisis comes again, our institutions can rely on laws, not discretionary decisions, to do their jobs. It will be a while before we can tell exactly what the impact of the pandemic on library eLending will be, but thanks to data collected through the Library Map of the World, we can already start to understand what the situation before was. While we are still a long way from complete data on this, we can already look at the situation in a number of countries. For example, in Germany, each registered user in a public or community library borrows 3.9 eBooks or other electronic documents a year (2018 figures), while in Denmark, it’s 2.3 (2018), in Austria 1.5 (2018), in New Zealand 1.1 (2016), in Finland 1 (2018) and in the Netherlands, 0.95 (2018). In both the UK (2018) and US (2014), it’s between 0.8 and 0.9, while in Singapore (2018) it’s 0.7 and in Spain (2017), it’s only 0.2. A slightly different picture emerges when looking at how these figures relate to numbers of physical loans. Here, the biggest share of eBooks in total book loans is in Denmark, where they represent 1 in 7 loans in total, while in Germany, the figure was 1 in 8. In both Spain and the United States, it’s 1 in 14, and New Zealand 1 in 17. Meanwhile, in all of Singapore, Australia and the Netherlands, it’s around 1 in 20 (or 5% of the total). There are higher figures still in some developing countries, although it is not certain that data is complete. At the same time, the potential of digital lending may be particularly powerful in situations where the public and community library network is not dense. It will be interesting to see how this graph evolves in future, in the light of the current crisis.   Find out more on the Library Map of the World, where you can download key library data in order to carry out your own analysis! See our other Library Stats of the Week! We are happy to share the data that supported this analysis on request.
No comment yet.