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5 Ways To Control Fibromyalgia With Diet

5 Ways To Control Fibromyalgia With Diet | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Fibromyalgia, a chronic disease that causes pain and swelling in more than a dozen points all over the body, affects as many as 5 million people. Because doctors are still unsure of the cause of fibromyalgia, treatment can be frustrating (and often a process of trial and error). “Fibromyalgia symptoms are only about 30% amenable to current pharmaceutical strategies on the market,” says Kathleen Holton, PhD, MPH, lead author of Potential Dietary Links in Central Sensitization in Fibromyalgia.

 

That’s why many patients are taking matters into their own hands and experimenting with alternative treatments, including dietary changes. Forty-two percent of fibro patients reported that symptoms worsened after eating certain foods, and though much of the research is in its preliminary phases, there’s some evidence that simple diet tweaks may ease fibro pain.

 

Read on to get 5 food rules for fibromyalgia patients (just be sure to consult your doctor before drastically changing your diet).

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Fibromyalgia can cause symptoms of pain and discomfort along with fatigue and concentration issues. Living with the condition can be difficult, however, there are many alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic, which can help people with the condition, find relief from their symptoms. In addition, following a balanced diet and the proper nutrition can help speed up the process of relief. For more information, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at (915) 850-0900. 

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Diet and Supplements
Dr. Alex Jimenez covers different diet and supplements plans for achieving overall wellness, including weight-loss, conditioning, and strengthening through healthy eating.  Book Appointment Today: https://bit.ly/Book-Online-Appointment
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Understanding the Nutritional Value of Dried Fruit | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Understanding the Nutritional Value of Dried Fruit | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Can knowing the serving size help lower sugar and calories for individuals who enjoy eating dried fruits?

Dried Fruits

Dried fruits, like cranberries, dates, raisins, and prunes, are great because they last a long time and are healthy sources of fiber, minerals, and vitamins. However, dried fruits contain more sugar and calories per serving because they lose volume when dehydrated, allowing more to be consumed. This is why the serving size matters to ensure one does not overeat.

Serving Size

Fruits are dried in dehydrators or left in the sun to dehydrate naturally. They are ready once most of the water has disappeared. The loss of water decreases their physical size, which allows individuals to eat more, increasing sugar and calorie intake. For example, around 30 grapes fit in a single measuring cup, but 250 raisins can fill one cup once dehydrated. Nutritional information for fresh and dried fruit.

 

Sugar

  • Ten grapes have 34 calories and about 7.5 grams of sugar. (FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2018)
  • Thirty raisins have 47 calories and under 10 grams of sugar.
  • Grapes' natural sugar content varies, so different types can be subject to nutritional value assessments.
  • Some fruits, like cranberries, can be very tart, so sugar or fruit juices are added during drying.

Ways to Use

Fresh fruit may be higher in certain vitamins, but mineral and fiber content are retained during drying. Dried fruits are versatile and can be made part of a healthy, balanced diet that can include:

Trail Mix

  • Mix dried fruits, nuts, and seeds.
  • Monitor portion size.

Oatmeal

  • Lightly sweeten oatmeal with a small serving of dried fruits for a hearty and healthy breakfast.

Salads

  • Toss dark, leafy greens, fresh apple slices, dried cranberries or raisins, and cheeses.

Main Course

  • Use dried fruit as an ingredient in savory entrees.

Protein Bar Substitutes

  • Raisins, dried blueberries, apple chips, and dried apricots are convenient and last longer than fresh fruit, making them perfect when protein bars are unavailable.

 

At Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic, our areas of practice include Wellness & Nutrition, Chronic Pain, Personal Injury, Auto Accident Care, Work Injuries, Back Injury, Low Back Pain, Neck Pain, Migraine Headaches, Sports Injuries, Severe Sciatica, Scoliosis, Complex Herniated Discs, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain, Complex Injuries, Stress Management, Functional Medicine Treatments, and in-scope care protocols. We focus on what works for you to achieve improvement goals and create an improved body through research methods and total wellness programs.

Functional Medicine's Influence Beyond Joints

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how they may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to discuss the subject matter above further, don't hesitate to contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2017). Raisins. Retrieved from https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/530717/nutrients

 

FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2018). Grapes, American type (slip skin), raw. Retrieved from https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/174682/nutrients

 

FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2018). Grapes, red or green (European type, such as Thompson seedles), raw. Retrieved from https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/174683/nutrients

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Learn about the pros and cons of dried fruits. Find out why serving size matters and how it can impact your sugar and calorie intake. For answers to any questions you may have, call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Exploring Egg Alternatives: A Guide for Allergy Sufferers - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Exploring Egg Alternatives: A Guide for Allergy Sufferers - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Can using egg substitutes or replacements be safe for individuals with an egg allergy?

Substitutes and Replacements

Individuals should not assume either is safe unless they carefully read the label.

 

  • Egg substitutes may contain eggs. 
  • Egg replacement products may be egg-free.
  • Look for alternatives labeled vegan or egg-free to ensure there are none.

Substitutes May Contain Eggs

Liquid egg substitutes in grocery store dairy aisles are made from eggs.  The following all contain eggs and are not safe for individuals with egg allergies:

 

  • Generic liquid egg substitutes in cartons
  • Egg Beaters
  • Powdered egg white products

Replacements Are Safe Alternatives

  • Special replacement products that do not contain eggs are available.
  • They are labeled vegan egg substitutes.
  • They are usually sold in powdered form.
  • They are useful for baking.
  • They cannot be used as a replacement for eggs in foods like a quiche.

Egg-Free Commercial Replacements

 

Always check the ingredients on the label before purchasing a product sold as a substitute or replacement to ensure it is completely free.

 

  • These products may also contain soy, dairy, or other food allergens.
  • Vegan - contains no animal products, which includes eggs and dairy.
  • Vegetarian - may contain eggs as they are not meat but an animal product.

Unaware of Foods With Eggs

Stay aware of eggs hidden in other food products, such as cakes, breads, pastries, noodles, crackers, and cereals.

 

  • The federal Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act requires that all packaged food products that contain eggs as an ingredient must list the word egg on the label. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration. 2022)

 

Other ingredients that indicate eggs are in the product include:

 

  • Albumin
  • Globulin
  • Lysozyme
  • Lecithin
  • Livetin
  • Vitellin
  • Ingredients starting with - ova or ovo.

Allergy Symptoms

Symptoms may consist of: (John W. Tan, Preeti Joshi 2014)

 

  • Skin reactions - hives, rash, or eczema.
  • Allergic conjunctivitis  - itchy, red, watery eyes.
  • Angioedema - swelling of the lips, tongue, or face.
  • Airway symptoms - wheezing, coughing, or a runny nose.
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms - nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or vomiting.
  • Severe reactions - such as anaphylaxis, can cause multiple organ system failure.
  • Anaphylaxis is an emergency and requires immediate medical treatment.

A Guide For Food Allergies, Hypersensitivity and Intolerances

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies that are available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

U.S. Food & Drug Administration. (2022). Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA). Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/food/food-allergensgluten-free-guidance-documents-regulatory-information/food-allergen-labeling-and-consumer-protection-act-2004-falcpa

 

Tan, J. W., & Joshi, P. (2014). Egg allergy: an update. Journal of paediatrics and child health, 50(1), 11–15. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpc.12408

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Find safe and egg-free alternatives for individuals with allergies. Explore vegan egg substitutes for all your cooking needs. For answers to any questions you may have, call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Different Types of Salt: All About Color, Texture, and Benefits | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Different Types of Salt: All About Color, Texture, and Benefits | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals looking to improve their diet, can knowing the different salt types help in food preparation and health?

Salt Types

Salt brings out the natural flavor of foods and can be used as a preservative. Salt types come in various colors and textures for cooking, flavor, and health. Some are considered healthier compared to regular table salt, like pink Himalayan salt and different sea salts. Some individuals prefer them because most go through less processing and can have more trace minerals like magnesium and potassium. However, all salts are healthy in moderation, as sodium is a necessary part of a balanced diet. Although essential for the body, sodium can be harmful when too much is consumed. A study examining consumer-grade pink Himalayan sea salts available in Australia determined that to receive the additional health benefits of the minerals from this type of salt, individuals must consume so much that it elevates the amount of sodium in the body to dangerous levels. (Flavia Fayet-Moore et al., 2020)

Salt

Salt is a mineral made from the combined elements:

 

  • Sodium - Na
  • Chlorine  -Cl
  • Together, they form crystallized sodium chloride NaCl.

 

The majority of salt production comes from evaporated seawater and salt mines. Many salts used in food preparation are iodized. Iodine is added to various refined salt products to help meet nutritional requirements. Iodine intake levels that fall below the recommended values could result in a deficiency and develop goiter. Goiter is associated with hypothyroidism. (Angela M. Leung et al., 2021) Lack of iodine can also have adverse effects on growth and development. (National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. 2023)

Essential for Health

Salt sustains life and optimal bodily function. Sodium and chlorine are important elements that maintain:

 

  • Cellular balance
  • Circulation
  • Blood sugar levels

 

Sodium is a mineral and an electrolyte. Common electrolytes include potassium, calcium, and bicarbonate. Without adequate sodium levels, the brain cannot send the necessary impulses to the rest of the body to function properly. However, consuming too much salt can cause health issues.

 

  • Higher salt intake in individuals who are sensitive to salt can increase blood pressure.
  • Doctors usually recommend that individuals with hypertension reduce sodium intake or follow a low-sodium diet.
  • Elevated sodium levels also cause water retention - considered a protective response as the body works to regulate serum sodium levels concentration in the blood to maintain balance.
  • If levels are too high, a condition known as hypernatremia can develop, which can cause:
  • Excessive thirst
  • Vomiting
  • Infrequent urination
  • Diarrhea
  • Sodium levels that are too low can lead to hyponatremia, which can cause:
  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Confusion

 

A blood test will determine whether serum sodium concentration is high, low, or normal. (U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. 2022)

 

Types

The average sodium intake by adults is around 3,393mg per day, ranging between 2,000–5,000mg. Guidelines recommend a maximum intake of 2,300mg per day. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2020) Whether from unhealthy dietary choices like processed foods or incorrect knowledge of sodium content when cooking, an American Heart Association survey showed that more than half of respondents inaccurately stated that sea salt had a lower sodium content than table salt. (American Heart Association. 2024)

Refined - Table Salt

Refined/iodized salt is finely granulated and commonly used in cooking. This type is highly refined to remove impurities and eliminate trace minerals often found in specialty salts. Because the salt is finely ground, anti-caking agents are added to ensure the salt doesn't clump. Some table salts also have added sugar and other additives.

 

  • Refined table salt is about 97–99% sodium chloride (NaCl).
  • Iodine is added to prevent iodine deficiency.
  • Individuals trying to reduce sodium intake but meet iodine levels can do so with foods like eggs, dairy products, and fish.

Kosher

Kosher salt is coarse and flakey and can add a crunchy texture to dishes and drinks. Pure kosher salt does not contain additives like anti-caking agents and iodine. The size of the salt crystals is ideal for drawing out moisture.

 

  • Per teaspoon, kosher salt generally has less sodium than 1 teaspoon of table salt.
  • Because it has a coarser grain, less salt fits in the measuring spoon.

Sea Salt

Sea salt is produced from evaporated seawater and comes as fine grains or large crystals. Examples include:

 

  • Black Sea
  • Celtic
  • French - fleur de sel
  • Hawaiian sea salt

 

Sea salt can have trace amounts of minerals like iron, potassium, and zinc, which can produce different flavors in cooking but no additional health benefits with normal consumption. Some sea salts may also contain trace amounts of microplastics. However, research indicates these amounts are too low to warrant public health concerns. (Ali Karami et al., 2017)

Himalayan Pink Salt

Himalayan pink salt is mined in the red salt range in Pakistan, the second-largest salt mine in the world, and in the Andes mountains of Peru. Trace amounts of iron oxide make the salt pink. It is typically used at the end of cooking to add flavor and a crunch. Himalayan salt is popular for its health benefits and mineral properties. However, using Himalayan salt over other types has no known health advantages. Researchers concluded that the potential health benefits provided by the higher nutrient content would be counteracted by the large amount of sodium that would need to be consumed. (Flavia Fayet-Moore et al., 2020)

Substitutes

Salt substitutes contain some or all sodium and potassium, magnesium, or other minerals. Substitutes can be half sodium chloride and half potassium chloride. Monosodium glutamate/MSG can also be used as an alternative. A study found that substituting salt with MSG is safe and comparable to salt flavor. (Jeremia Halim et al., 2020) Individuals often use substitutes on a sodium-restricted diet but should check with their doctor before using these products, especially if they have kidney conditions.

Body In Balance - Chiropractic+Fitness+Nutrition

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Fayet-Moore, F., Wibisono, C., Carr, P., Duve, E., Petocz, P., Lancaster, G., McMillan, J., Marshall, S., & Blumfield, M. (2020). An Analysis of the Mineral Composition of Pink Salt Available in Australia. Foods (Basel, Switzerland), 9(10), 1490. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101490

 

Leung, A. M., Braverman, L. E., & Pearce, E. N. (2012). History of U.S. iodine fortification and supplementation. Nutrients, 4(11), 1740–1746. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu4111740

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. (2023). Iodine: Fact Sheet for Professionals. Retrieved from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-HealthProfessional/

 

U.S. National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. (2022). Sodium blood test. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/lab-tests/sodium-blood-test/

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture. FoodData Central. (2020). Salt. Retrieved from https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/1112305/nutrients

 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2020). 2020–2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Retrieved from https://www.dietaryguidelines.gov/sites/default/files/2020-12/Dietary_Guidelines_for_Americans_2020-2025.pdf

 

American Heart Association. (2024). Sea Salt vs. Table Salt (Healthy Living, Issue. https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/sodium/sea-salt-vs-table-salt

 

Karami, A., Golieskardi, A., Keong Choo, C., Larat, V., Galloway, T. S., & Salamatinia, B. (2017). The presence of microplastics in commercial salts from different countries. Scientific reports, 7, 46173. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep46173

 

Halim, J., Bouzari, A., Felder, D., & Guinard, J. X. (2020). The Salt Flip: Sensory mitigation of salt (and sodium) reduction with monosodium glutamate (MSG) in "Better-for-You" foods. Journal of food science, 85(9), 2902–2914. https://doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.15354

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Discover the different types of salt: from Pink Himalayan & Sea Salts to regular table salt. Learn about their flavors, forms & minerals! For answers to any questions you may have, call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Vitamin E Rich Sunflower Seeds: Health Benefits Explained | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Vitamin E Rich Sunflower Seeds: Health Benefits Explained | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals looking for a quick healthy snack, can adding sunflower seeds to one's diet provide health benefits?

Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are the fruit of the sunflower plant. They have been found to contain antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, which can help maintain immune system health, heart health, and more. Regularly grabbing a handful as a snack or adding to salads, oatmeal, baked goods, tuna salad, pasta, and vegetable toppings can help increase energy levels, reduce inflammation, and support general body health.

Benefits

Sunflower seeds are beneficial for various bodily functions and protect against certain chronic health conditions. They can help with the following: (Bartholomew Saanu Adeleke, Olubukola Oluranti Babalola. 2020) (Ancuţa Petraru, Florin Ursachi, Sonia Amariei. 2021)

Inflammation

  • The seed's high vitamin E value, combined with flavonoids and various plant compounds, can help reduce inflammation.
  • Research suggests that eating seeds at least five times a week may reduce inflammation and lower the risk of developing certain diseases. (Rui Jiang et al., 2006)

Heart Health

  • They are high in healthy fats, like polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats.
  • Plant sterols, or the natural compounds in sunflower seeds, are recommended for their cholesterol-lowering properties. (University of Wisconsin Health. 2023)
  • Data show sunflower and other seeds consumption may lower rates of heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

Energy

  • The seeds contain vitamin B, selenium, and protein, which can help energize the body throughout the day.
  • These nutrients support blood circulation, oxygen delivery, and food conversion into energy.

Immune System Support

  • Sunflower seeds contain minerals and nutrients like zinc and selenium that help the body's natural ability to defend against viruses and bacteria.
  • These minerals translate into benefits like immune cell maintenance, inflammation reduction, infection protection, and an overall increase in immunity.

Nutrition

Individuals don't need to consume a lot of sunflower seeds to gain the nutritional benefits. Inside is a well-rounded mix of healthy fats, antioxidants, and other nutrients. Inside a 1-ounce portion of roasted sunflower seeds/without salt: (U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2018)

 

  • Calories - 165
  • Carbohydrates - 7 grams
  • Fiber - 3 grams
  • Sugar - 1 grams
  • Protein - 5.5 grams
  • Total fat - 14 grams
  • Sodium - 1 milligrams
  • Iron - 1 milligram
  • Vitamin E - 7.5 milligrams
  • Zinc - 1.5 milligrams
  • Folate - 67 micrograms

Female Health

  • When it comes to female reproductive health, there are aspects that the seeds may be able to help support.
  • The seed's rich amounts of vitamin E, folate, phosphorus, and healthy fats are crucial for fetal development and maternal health.
  • In addition, the seeds' phytochemicals can support digestion and the immune system, which can be beneficial during pregnancy. (National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. 2021)

Male Health

  • Sunflower seeds can help males acquire protein for muscle-building.
  • As an alternative to meat, these seeds contain a healthy amount of plant-based protein without the additional saturated fat or cholesterol of meat.
  • A handful provides this nutrient for those who don't get the daily potassium requirement. (Ancuţa Petraru, Florin Ursachi, Sonia Amariei. 2021)

Shelled Seeds and Salt Intake

  • Sunflower seeds naturally do not contain high amounts of sodium, but they are often packaged with added salt that can potentially sabotage their nutritional benefits.
  • The shells are usually coated in salt for flavor, as much as 70 milligrams for every 1 ounce of seeds.
  • High in calories, individuals should consider moderating portions to one-quarter cup and eating the unsalted varieties. (U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2018)

Other Ways To Incorporate Seeds Into Meals

Other ways to add sunflower seeds to meals include:

 

  • Sprinkling them on chicken or a tuna salad.
  • Salad topping.
  • Topping for cereal and oatmeal.
  • Mixing them into batter for baked goods, like cookies.
  • Adding them to homemade or grocery store trail mix.
  • Grinding the seeds for a flour coating for meat or fish.
  • Sprinkling them into vegetable dishes, casseroles, stir-fries, and pasta.
  • Sunflower butter can be an alternative to peanut or other nut butters.

Sports Injury Rehabilitation

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to discuss the subject matter above further, don't hesitate to contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Adeleke, B. S., & Babalola, O. O. (2020). Oilseed crop sunflower (Helianthus annuus) as a source of food: Nutritional and health benefits. Food science & nutrition, 8(9), 4666–4684. https://doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.1783

 

Petraru, A., Ursachi, F., & Amariei, S. (2021). Nutritional Characteristics Assessment of Sunflower Seeds, Oil and Cake. Perspective of Using Sunflower Oilcakes as a Functional Ingredient. Plants (Basel, Switzerland), 10(11), 2487. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants1011248

 

Jiang, R., Jacobs, D. R., Jr, Mayer-Davis, E., Szklo, M., Herrington, D., Jenny, N. S., Kronmal, R., & Barr, R. G. (2006). Nut and seed consumption and inflammatory markers in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. American journal of epidemiology, 163(3), 222–231. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwj033

 

University of Wisconsin Health. (2023). Health facts for you: Plant stanols and sterols.

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2018). Seeds, sunflower seed kernels, dry roasted, without salt.

 

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. (2021). Vitamin E: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals.

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture. (2018). Seeds, sunflower seed kernels, toasted, with salt added.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Pack your diet with sunflower seeds! Loaded with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, supports heart health and energy levels. For answers to any questions you may have, please contact Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Eating Protein for Weight Loss: What Bars to Choose - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Eating Protein for Weight Loss: What Bars to Choose - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals trying to make healthy lifestyle adjustments, can adding protein bars into their diet help achieve health goals?

Protein Bar

Protein bars provide a quick energy boost between meals that can help curb appetite and avoid filling up on high-fat, sodium-packed snacks for individuals trying to lose weight. They can also increase calorie intake for individuals like athletes trying to increase muscle mass. Protein bars can vary in terms of factors like additives, calories, fat, sugars, and other ingredients. Labels need to be read carefully; otherwise, the bar can be more of a candy bar than a healthy, nutritious mini-meal or snack. It's important to have a sense of how much protein is really needed each day, and the amount varies depending on individual factors.

How Much Protein Is Needed

Protein is vital to many body functions, but the body can't produce this macronutrient, and it has to come from food. Dietary protein is broken down during digestion, and compounds known as amino acids are formed:

 

  • These are the building blocks the body uses to build and maintain muscles and organs.
  • It is vital to the production of blood, connective tissue, antibodies, enzymes, and hair. (Marta Lonnie, et al., 2018)
  • As protein is necessary for building muscle, athletes or individuals with physically demanding jobs are recommended to eat more.
  • The same is true of women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. (Trina V. Stephens, et al., 2015)
  • Bodybuilders eat even more protein than the average person to support muscle growth.

Protein Calculator

Sources

The richest sources of dietary protein include:

 

  • Meats
  • Poultry
  • Fish and shellfish
  • Eggs
  • Milk and other dairy products

 

Plant sources include:

 

  • Beans
  • Legumes
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Whole grains

 

These are foods that are easy to include in a balanced diet, so eating a variety in ample quantities daily will equal the recommended amount of protein. Recommendations are to stick with those low in saturated fat and processed carbs and rich in nutrients. However, eating too much protein can cause kidney problems. Therefore, individuals who are predisposed to kidney disease are recommended to be careful over-protein intake. (Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, Holly M. Kramer, Denis Fouque. 2020)

What To Look For

Incorporating protein bars into a diet, either as a between-meal snack, as a grab-and-go option when there is no time for a full meal, or as a part of a weight-loss or weight-gain strategy, individuals need to read and understand the ingredients on the different types of bars to choosing the healthiest options. Some general guidelines to consider:

Protein Content

  • For a between-meal or pre-post-workout snack, look for a bar with at least 20 grams of protein.
  • Meal replacement bars should have at least 30 grams of protein.
  • A less is more approach to these guidelines is recommended, as the body can digest only between 20 and 40 grams of protein in one sitting. (Brad Jon Schoenfeld, Alan Albert Aragon. 2018)

Protein Type

  • The protein usually comes from dairy or plant sources.
  • The most common include eggs, milk, rice, whey, soy, peas, and hemp.
  • Individuals with allergies or sensitivities need to choose a bar that is comprised of a type of protein that is safe to eat.

Calories

  • For a bar to eat between meals, recommendations are those with around 220 to 250 calories.
  • A protein bar that substitutes for a full meal can have 300 to 400 calories.

Fat

  • Ten to 15 grams of total fat and no more than two grams of saturated fat is ideal.
  • Steer clear of unhealthy trans fats found in partially hydrogenated oils.

Fiber

  • Fiber is filling, so the more fiber, the more likely it is to keep hunger satisfied until the next snack or meal.
  • It is recommended to choose those that contain more than three to five grams of fiber.

Sugar

  • Some protein bars have just as much sugar content as candy bars.
  • Some have as much as 30 grams of added sugar.
  • The ideal amount is around five grams or less.
  • Artificial sweeteners like erythritol, sorbitol, and maltitol are not better options as they can cause bloating and gas.

 

It is recommended to work with a nutritionist to figure out the most effective type so that they can be incorporated into an individual's diet to achieve and maintain health goals.

Nutrition Fundamentals

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Lonnie, M., Hooker, E., Brunstrom, J. M., Corfe, B. M., Green, M. A., Watson, A. W., Williams, E. A., Stevenson, E. J., Penson, S., & Johnstone, A. M. (2018). Protein for Life: Review of Optimal Protein Intake, Sustainable Dietary Sources and the Effect on Appetite in Ageing Adults. Nutrients, 10(3), 360. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030360

 

Stephens, T. V., Payne, M., Ball, R. O., Pencharz, P. B., & Elango, R. (2015). Protein requirements of healthy pregnant women during early and late gestation are higher than current recommendations. The Journal of nutrition, 145(1), 73–78. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.198622

 

Arentson-Lantz, E., Clairmont, S., Paddon-Jones, D., Tremblay, A., & Elango, R. (2015). Protein: A nutrient in focus. Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme, 40(8), 755–761. https://doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2014-0530

 

Kalantar-Zadeh, K., Kramer, H. M., & Fouque, D. (2020). High-protein diet is bad for kidney health: unleashing the taboo. Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, 35(1), 1–4. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfz216

 

Schoenfeld, B. J., & Aragon, A. A. (2018). How much protein can the body use in a single meal for muscle-building? Implications for daily protein distribution. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 15, 10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-018-0215-1

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

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Healthy Food Substitutions: A Guide to Making Smart Swaps - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Healthy Food Substitutions: A Guide to Making Smart Swaps - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals looking to improve their quality of life, can substituting healthy meal ingredients be a simple step toward better health?

Food Substitutions

Eating well does not mean having to give up favorite foods. Part of the enjoyment of home cooking is putting one's own style on each dish. Individuals soon discover they prefer healthy food substitutions to the original high-fat, high-sugar, or high-sodium ingredients. Healthy swaps can be introduced gradually to allow the taste buds to adapt. It is possible to reduce:

 

  • Calories
  • Unhealthy fats
  • Sodium
  • Refined sugars

 

Simply making smart swaps that replace some ingredients with more beneficial ones.

Ingredients for Healthier Meals

Recipes are the sum of their parts. A dish made with multiple ingredients adds its own nutrition for healthy or unhealthy. Ingredients high in calories, saturated fat, added sugars, and/or sodium can make a dish less nutritious. By making strategic food substitutions, individuals can transform a high-calorie, high-fat, sugary dish into something more nutritious. When done regularly this adjustment leads to long-term healthy behavior changes. Making small adjustments leads to improvements in weight management, heart health, and risk of chronic diseases.

Substituting Unhealthy Fats and Oils

  1. Instead of baking with butter, try using applesauce, mashed avocados, or mashed bananas.
  2. These plant-based alternatives don't overload the body with saturated fat.
  3. Try using half butter and half an alternative to cut calories and fats.
  4. For cooking, try sautéing, roasting, or pan-frying in olive or avocado oil.
  5. Both contain healthy monounsaturated fats.
  6. These oils can be used for dipping bread with dinner or for a quick snack.
  7. Fresh herbs or a dash of balsamic vinegar can add flavor.

Refined Sugars

Enjoying sweets can be healthy, but the objective is to be mindful of how much-refined sugar is consumed. Sweet flavors send signals to the reward centers in the brain, increasing positive associations with sugar. However, eating high amounts of sugar can lead to:

 

 

Try to control how much sugar goes in.

 

  1. Consider incrementally scaling back on sugar in baked goods by adding three-fourths or half of the sugar.
  2. Try using fresh fruit as a natural sweetener.
  3. Mashed dates add caramel-like flavor without spiking blood sugar like white sugar.
  4. Maple syrup is another alternative.
  5. Experiment with options and combinations to keep refined sugars to a minimum.
  6. For soda or other sweetened beverages, consider going half with sparkling water and soda or juice.
  7. Sweeten water with fruit by steeping it in an infusion pitcher or bottle.

Sodium

Salt is another common excess in an individual diet. Sodium contributes to high rates of elevated blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke.

 

  • The CDC offers tips on how reducing sodium can improve health. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2018)
  • An array of other herbs and spices can amplify the flavor of meals.
  • Purchase or create various flavor blends.
  • For example, cumin, chili powder, oregano, and red pepper flakes can spice up a dish or a blend of thyme, paprika, garlic powder, and onion powder can add savory notes.
  • A study found that adding lemon juice to recipes could reduce sodium content and add tanginess. (Sunkist Growers. 2014)

Whole Grains

Individuals don’t have to choose brown rice or whole wheat pasta for every meal but try to select whole grains half of the time. Food substitutions that can help achieve the halfway point include:

 

  • Popcorn or whole wheat crackers instead of refined flour crackers.
  • Whole wheat pizza crust instead of regular crust.
  • Substitute brown rice for white in stir-fries or casseroles.
  • Oatmeal instead of refined grain cereal.
  • Whole wheat pasta for spaghetti and meatballs or other pasta dishes.
  • Quinoa as a side dish instead of white rice or couscous.

 

More whole grains equals more fiber and B vitamins to help sustain energy, prevent blood sugar spikes, and promote digestive health. Eating more whole grains has been linked with a reduced risk of heart disease (Caleigh M Sawicki, et al. 2021) and a lower risk of colon cancer. (Glenn A. Gaesser. 2020)

 

Finding the right combination of each of these substitutions takes time. Go slow and taste often to see how each substitution affects a recipe’s taste and texture.

Boost Metabolism

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Zong, G., Li, Y., Wanders, A. J., Alssema, M., Zock, P. L., Willett, W. C., Hu, F. B., & Sun, Q. (2016). Intake of individual saturated fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease in US men and women: two prospective longitudinal cohort studies. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 355, i5796. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i5796

 

American Heart Association. Saturated fat.

 

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Different dietary fat, different risk of mortality.

 

Faruque, S., Tong, J., Lacmanovic, V., Agbonghae, C., Minaya, D. M., & Czaja, K. (2019). The Dose Makes the Poison: Sugar and Obesity in the United States - a Review. Polish journal of food and nutrition sciences, 69(3), 219–233. https://doi.org/10.31883/pjfns/110735

 

Harvard Health Publishing. The sweet danger of sugar.

 

American Heart Association. How much sugar is too much?

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How to Reduce Sodium Intake.

 

Sunkist Growers. Sunkist Growers and Chefs from Johnson & Wales University Release New S’alternative® Research.

 

Sawicki, C. M., Jacques, P. F., Lichtenstein, A. H., Rogers, G. T., Ma, J., Saltzman, E., & McKeown, N. M. (2021). Whole- and Refined-Grain Consumption and Longitudinal Changes in Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in the Framingham Offspring Cohort. The Journal of nutrition, 151(9), 2790–2799. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxab177

 

Gaesser G. A. (2020). Whole Grains, Refined Grains, and Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review of Meta-analyses of Observational Studies. Nutrients, 12(12), 3756. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123756

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Learn the benefits of making healthier food substitutions & how to reduce calories, unhealthy fats, sodium & sugars. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Black Pepper Health Benefits | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Black Pepper Health Benefits | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Should individuals increase their intake of black pepper to help with various health issues like fighting inflammation, strengthening the immune system, and improving digestion?

Black Pepper

One of the most popular spices, black pepper offers anti-inflammatory and pain-reducing effects. Piperine is the compound that gives black pepper its flavor, helps prevent inflammation, (Gorgani Leila, et al., 2016), and helps to increase the absorption of selenium, vitamin B12, and turmeric. (Dudhatra GB, et al., 2012) Piperine has been found to be almost as effective as prednisolone - a common medication for arthritis - in reducing symptoms.

 

  • Black pepper has been used in ancient Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years because of its concentration of beneficial plant compounds. (Johns Hopkins Medicine, 2023)
  • Pepper is made by grinding peppercorns, which are dried berries from the vine Piper nigrum.
  • The plant is a tall woody plant with small flowers that bloom a yellowish-red color.
  • It has a sharp and mildly spicy flavor that goes with all kinds of dishes.

Nutrition

The following nutrition is for 1 tablespoon of black pepper. (USDA, FoodData Central)

 

  • Calories - 17
  • Fat - 0.2g
  • Carbohydrates - 4.4g
  • Sodium - 1.38mg
  • Fiber - 1.8g
  • Sugars - 0g
  • Protein - 0.7g
  • Magnesium - 11.8mg
  • Vitamin K - 11.3mg
  • Calcium - 30.6mg
  • Iron - 0.7mg
  • Potassium - 91.7mg
  • Black pepper provides vitamin K, necessary for blood clotting, bone metabolism, and regulating blood calcium levels.
  • Additional vitamins include C, E, A, and B vitamins, calcium, and potassium. (Platel K, Srinivasan K., et al., 2016)

Benefits

Decrease Inflammation

Inflammation is the immune system’s response to injury, illness, or any mental or physical stressor, that triggers the body’s healing and repair process. However, long-term inflammation can lead to various health problems and, in individuals that begin to develop arthritis, joint degeneration. Damage to the body’s pain processors can exacerbate pain and other uncomfortable symptoms.

 

  • The main active component piperine, has been shown to decrease inflammation. (Kunnumakkara AB, et al., 2018)
  • Chronic inflammation can be a cause of diabetes, arthritis, asthma, and heart disease.
  • While the anti-inflammatory effects have not been extensively studied in humans, there are several mouse studies that show promising results.
  • In one study, treatment for arthritis with piperine resulted in less joint swelling and decreased inflammation markers. (Bang JS, Oh DH, Choi HM, et al., 2009)

Antioxidants

  • The active compound, piperine is rich in antioxidants, which prevent or delay the free radical damaging effects from exposure to pollution, smoke, and the sun.
  • Free radicals are associated with diseases like heart disease and cancer. (Lobo V., et al., 2010)
  • In one study, rats with a diet of concentrated black pepper had less free radical damage than a group that did not ingest concentrated black pepper. (Vijayakumar RS, Surya D, Nalini N. 2004)

Brain Function Improvement

  • Piperine has been shown to decrease symptoms associated with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's and improve brain function. (Ramaswamy Kannappan, et al., 2011)
    Studies show piperine increased memory as well as the ability to decrease the production of amyloid plaques, which are damaging proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Blood Sugar Control Improvement

  • Studies suggest that piperine can improve blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity.
  • In one study, individuals with insulin resistance took a piperine supplement for 8 weeks.
  • After 8 weeks, improvements were seen in the response to the insulin hormone to remove glucose from the blood (Rondanelli M, et al., 2013)

Improved Nutrient Absorption

  • Black pepper is considered to have the ability to bind and activate with other foods for improved positive health effects.
  • It increases the absorption of certain nutrients such as calcium, turmeric, selenium, and green tea.
  • It is often recommended to consume calcium or selenium with a source of black pepper and to ensure any turmeric supplement you take contains black pepper. (Shoba G, et al., 1998)

Storage

  • Whole peppercorns sealed in a container and stored in a cool, dry place can last up to a year.
  • Over time ground black pepper loses its flavor, therefore it is recommended to use within 4 to 6 months.

Allergic Reactions

  • If you believe you are allergic to black pepper, see a healthcare professional who can perform testing to determine the root cause of symptoms.
  • Allergies can present as tingling or itching in the mouth, hives, abdominal pain, and possible nausea and vomiting.
  • Symptoms can also include wheezing, congestion, and/or swelling of the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat.
  • Black pepper can be substituted with spices like chili powder, cayenne pepper, and allspice.

The Healing Diet

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Gorgani, L., Mohammadi, M., Najafpour, G. D., & Nikzad, M. (2017). Piperine-The Bioactive Compound of Black Pepper: From Isolation to Medicinal Formulations. Comprehensive reviews in food science and food safety, 16(1), 124–140. https://doi.org/10.1111/1541-4337.12246

 

Dudhatra, G. B., Mody, S. K., Awale, M. M., Patel, H. B., Modi, C. M., Kumar, A., Kamani, D. R., & Chauhan, B. N. (2012). A comprehensive review on pharmacotherapeutics of herbal bio-enhancers. TheScientificWorldJournal, 2012, 637953. https://doi.org/10.1100/2012/637953

 

Johns Hopkins Medicine. Ayurveda, 2023. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/ayurveda

 

USDA, FoodData Central. Spices, pepper, black.

 

Platel, K., & Srinivasan, K. (2016). Bioavailability of Micronutrients from Plant Foods: An Update. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, 56(10), 1608–1619. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2013.781011

 

Kunnumakkara, A. B., Sailo, B. L., Banik, K., Harsha, C., Prasad, S., Gupta, S. C., Bharti, A. C., & Aggarwal, B. B. (2018). Chronic diseases, inflammation, and spices: how are they linked? Journal of translational medicine, 16(1), 14. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12967-018-1381-2

 

Bang, J. S., Oh, D. H., Choi, H. M., Sur, B. J., Lim, S. J., Kim, J. Y., Yang, H. I., Yoo, M. C., Hahm, D. H., & Kim, K. S. (2009). Anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic effects of piperine in human interleukin 1beta-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and in rat arthritis models. Arthritis research & therapy, 11(2), R49. https://doi.org/10.1186/ar2662

 

Lobo, V., Patil, A., Phatak, A., & Chandra, N. (2010). Free radicals, antioxidants, and functional foods: Impact on human health. Pharmacognosy reviews, 4(8), 118–126. https://doi.org/10.4103/0973-7847.70902

 

Vijayakumar, R. S., Surya, D., & Nalini, N. (2004). Antioxidant efficacy of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and piperine in rats with high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress. Redox report: communications in free radical research, 9(2), 105–110. https://doi.org/10.1179/135100004225004742

 

Kannappan, R., Gupta, S. C., Kim, J. H., Reuter, S., & Aggarwal, B. B. (2011). Neuroprotection by spice-derived nutraceuticals: you are what you eat! Molecular neurobiology, 44(2), 142–159. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12035-011-8168-2

 

Rondanelli, M., Opizzi, A., Perna, S., Faliva, M., Solerte, S. B., Fioravanti, M., Klersy, C., Cava, E., Paolini, M., Scavone, L., Ceccarelli, P., Castellaneta, E., Savina, C., & Donini, L. M. (2013). Improvement in insulin resistance and favorable changes in plasma inflammatory adipokines after weight loss associated with two months' consumption of a combination of bioactive food ingredients in overweight subjects. Endocrine, 44(2), 391–401. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-012-9863-0

 

Shoba, G., Joy, D., Joseph, T., Majeed, M., Rajendran, R., & Srinivas, P. S. (1998). Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Planta medica, 64(4), 353–356. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-957450

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Should individuals increase black pepper intake to help with various health issues like fighting inflammation and improved digestion? For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Watermelon Nutrition: EP Wellness and Functional Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Watermelon Nutrition: EP Wellness and Functional Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Watermelon, one of the summer's main fruits, is low in calories and rich in water. It provides an excellent source of vitamins A and C and lycopene and is less acidic than citrus fruits and tomatoes. The whole fruit is edible. The watermelon can be used as frozen chunks for water or seltzer drinks, smoothies, salsas, and salads; the rind can be stir-fried, stewed, or pickled, and the subtle sweetness pairs well with cheese, nuts, and other protein sources.

Watermelon

Watermelon poses few risks, with research deeming the fruit nontoxic. Side effects from eating too much watermelon can include abdominal discomfort, bloating, and gas.
The fruit does contain sugar, recommending individuals with diabetes should be careful to avoid sugar spikes.

Vitamins and Minerals

  • A fully ripe red watermelon contains higher nutrients than a less ripe watermelon.
  • A single serving is a healthy source of vitamins C and A, providing a significant percentage of the daily requirement.
  • Vitamin C aids in wound healing and can help increase anti-aging properties and immune system function.
  • Vitamin A is important for eye health.

Calories

  • One cup of diced or balled watermelon contains about 46 calories.
  • Wedges around one-sixteenth of the melon, or 286 g, contain approximately 86 calories.

Benefits

Watermelon can benefit health in several ways.

Fight Dehydration

  • Watermelon is nearly 92% water, making it a hydrating food choice.
  • If it is a struggle to drink water, specifically during the hot summer days, a few servings of watermelon can rehydrate the body.

Reduce Blood Pressure

  • Watermelon contains antioxidants that research has shown can help reduce or prevent high blood pressure.
  • A fully ripe melon contains more lycopene than a tomato.

Reduce Risk of Infections and Cancer

Contributes to Weight Loss

  • A group of overweight adults participated in a study that found the group that ate watermelon instead of low-fat cookies felt fuller.
  • The watermelon group also showed reductions in body weight, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood pressure.

Reduce Muscle Fatigue

  • The fruit contains a significant amount of the amino acid citrulline.
  • Capsules of concentrated citrulline are sold as nutritional supplements.
  • The benefits are not conclusive, but some studies show that supplements could reduce the feeling of fatigue.

Nutrition Fundamentals

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Bailey, Stephen J et al. "Two weeks of watermelon juice supplementation improves nitric oxide bioavailability but not endurance exercise performance in humans." Nitric oxide: biology and chemistry vol. 59 (2016): 10-20. doi:10.1016/j.niox.2016.06.008

 

Burton-Freeman, Britt, et al. "Watermelon and L-Citrulline in Cardio-Metabolic Health: Review of the Evidence 2000-2020." Current atherosclerosis reports vol. 23,12 81. 11 Dec. 2021, doi:10.1007/s11883-021-00978-5

 

Figueroa, Arturo, et al. "Watermelon extract supplementation reduces ankle blood pressure and carotid augmentation index in obese adults with prehypertension or hypertension." American Journal of Hypertension vol. 25,6 (2012): 640-3. doi:10.1038/ajh.2012.20

 

Glenn, J.M., Gray, M., Wethington, L.N. et al. Acute citrulline malate supplementation improves upper- and lower-body submaximal weightlifting exercise performance in resistance-trained females. Eur J Nutr 56, 775–784 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-1124-6

 

Martínez-Sánchez A., Ramos-Campo D. J., Fernández-Lobato B., Rubio-Arias J. A., Alacid F., & Aguayo E. (2017). Biochemical, physiological, and performance response of a functional watermelon juice enriched in L-citrulline during a half-marathon race. Food & Nutrition Research, 61. Retrieved from https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/1203

 

Naz, Ambreen, et al. "Watermelon lycopene and allied health claims." EXCLI journal vol. 13 650-60. 3 Jun. 2014

 

Panche, A N et al. "Flavonoids: an overview." Journal of nutritional science vol. 5 e47. 29 Dec. 2016, doi:10.1017/jns.2016.41

 

Volino-Souza, Mônica et al. “Current Evidence of Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) Ingestion on Vascular Health: A Food Science and Technology Perspective.” Nutrients vol. 14,14 2913. 15 Jul. 2022, doi:10.3390/nu14142913

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Watermelon can be used as frozen chunks for water, smoothies, salsas, and salads, and the subtle sweetness pairs well with cheese and nuts. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Making A Satisfying Salad: EP Wellness and Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Making A Satisfying Salad: EP Wellness and Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

A satisfying salad is a great way to get more fruits and vegetables high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber. A salad using the right ingredients can be a filling meal. With the summer heat kicking in, making a quick, satisfying salad using your favorite ingredients can help cool off, rehydrate, and refuel the body. 

Making A Satisfying Salad

Leafy Greens

  • Start with leafy greens.
  • They're low in calories and a healthy source of fiber.
  • Different varieties include iceberg lettuce, leaf lettuce, spinach, escarole, romaine, kale, and butter lettuce.
  • The darker greens offer more nutrients.

Vegetables

  • Carrots, peppers, green beans, eggplant, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, zucchini, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, or scallions.
  • Raw diced or cooked vegetables are a good addition.
  • Leftover cooked vegetables will work.
  • Brightly colored vegetables have flavonoids rich in antioxidants, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Choose all the colors and add two or three half-cup servings.

Grains - Starch

  • Add whole grains or starchy vegetables.
  • A serving of cooked:
  • Whole grains like brown rice, barley, or quinoa.
  • Starchy vegetables like roasted sweet potatoes or cooked butternut squash.
  • These provide fiber, complex carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals.

Fruit

  • Fruits or berries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, pomegranate seeds, apple slices, oranges, dates, and raisins can add vitamins, fiber, and antioxidants.
  • One-half cup of apple slices has 30 calories.
  • One-half cup of berries has about 40 calories.

Protein

  • A hard-boiled egg is an excellent source of protein.
  • A serving of lean beef, cooked shrimp, tuna, chicken breast, cheese strips, beans or legumes, hummus, tofu, or cottage cheese.
  • Be mindful of portion size.
  • A quarter cup of chopped chicken meat or one egg will add 75 calories.
  • Half a can of tuna adds about 80 calories.
  • Depending if it is low fat, two ounces of cubed or shredded mozzarella or cheddar cheese can add 200 calories.

Nuts or Seeds

  • Almonds, cashews, walnuts, pecans, sunflower, pumpkin, or chia seeds are great for added crunch.
  • All nuts add protein and heart-healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.
  • One-eighth cup of nuts adds around 90 calories.
  • Walnuts contain omega-3 fatty acids.

Salad Dressing

  • Add salad dressing.
  • One tablespoon of regular commercial salad dressing adds 50 to 80 calories.
  • Low-fat and reduced-calorie dressings are available.
  • Use freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice.
  • Make a dressing with avocado, walnut, or extra virgin olive oil.

Low-Carbohydrate Taco Salad

This is an easy recipe. The meat can be prepared ahead or be leftovers from another meal.

Ingredients

  • One pound lean ground beef - 85% to 89% lean.
  • One tablespoon of chili powder.
  • Salt and pepper, to taste.
  • Green onions, chopped with white and green parts separated.
  • One head of lettuce, chopped.
  • One medium tomato, chopped.
  • One avocado, diced.
  • Optional - one 4-ounce can of sliced olives. 
  • 1 1/2 cups of grated fat-free cheddar, Monterey Jack cheese, or a combination.
  • 1/2 cup fat-free Greek or plain yogurt.
  • 1/2 cup salsa.

Preparation

  • Cook beef in a skillet with chili powder, the white part of the onions, and salt and pepper.
  • Once cooked, cover the pan.
  • In a large salad bowl, mix the green onion, lettuce, tomato, avocado, and olives.
  • Add the meat and cheese and gently toss together.
  • Top with dollops of low-fat or reduced-calorie sour cream, yogurt, or salsa.
  • Try other meats like ground turkey, chicken, or pork.
  • For a vegetarian option, replace the ground meat with beans or textured vegetable protein.
  • Adding beans will increase fiber, protein, and total carbohydrates.

Body Signals Decoded

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Chambers L, McCrickerd K, Yeomans MR. Optimizing foods for satiety. Trends in Food Science & Technology. 2015;41(2):149-160. doi:10.1016/j.tifs.2014.10.007

 

Cox, B D et al. "Seasonal consumption of salad vegetables and fresh fruit in relation to the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer." Public health nutrition vol. 3,1 (2000): 19-29. doi:10.1017/s1368980000000045

 

Dreher ML, Davenport AJ. Hass avocado composition and potential health effects. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):738-750. doi:10.1080/10408398.2011.556759

 

Roe, Liane S et al. “Salad and satiety. The effect of timing of salad consumption on meal energy intake." Appetite vol. 58,1 (2012): 242-8. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2011.10.003

 

Sebastian, Rhonda S., et al. "Salad Consumption in the U.S. What We Eat in America, NHANES 2011-2014." FSRG Dietary Data Briefs, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), February 2018.

 

Yen, P K. "Nutrition: salad sense." Geriatric nursing (New York, N.Y.) vol. 6,4 (1985): 227-8. doi:10.1016/s0197-4572(85)80093-8

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Making a quick, satisfying salad using your favorite ingredients can help cool off, rehydrate, and refuel the body. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Supplements To Ease Headaches: EP Chiropractic Scientists | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Supplements To Ease Headaches: EP Chiropractic Scientists | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Individuals dealing with headaches or migraines should consider incorporating supplements to ease headaches' severity and frequency. Nutrition and food habits affect all systems in the body. Although slower to take effect than medications, if a diet is used correctly to heal the body and maintain health, other treatments may not be necessary or require less. Many health providers understand that food is a medicine that can assist healing therapies like massage and chiropractic care, which makes the treatment more effective when used with dietary adjustments.

Supplements To Ease Headaches

An unhealthy lifestyle and diet are not the only contributing factor to headaches. Others include:

 

  • Stress.
  • Job occupation.
  • Sleeping problems.
  • Muscular tension.
  • Vision problems.
  • Certain medication usage.
  • Dental conditions.
  • Hormonal influences.
  • Infections.

Healthy Diet Foundation

The goal of functional medicine is to help individuals reach their health and wellness goals that, include:

 

  • Regularly active lifestyle.
  • Optimal breathing patterns.
  • Quality sleep patterns.
  • Thorough hydration.
  • Healthy nutrition.
  • Improved digestive health.
  • Improved mental health.
  • Improved musculoskeletal health.

Pain Receptors - Headache

Pain and discomfort symptoms present when various head structures become inflamed or irritated. These structures include:

 

  • Nerves of the head and neck.
  • Muscles of the neck and head.
  • The skin of the head.
  • Arteries that lead to the brain.
  • Membranes of the ear, nose, and throat.
  • Sinuses that form part of the respiratory system.

 

The pain can also be referred, meaning that pain in one area can spread to nearby areas. An example is headache pain developed from neck stiffness and tightness.

Causes

Foods

Determining whether food sensitivities cause or contribute to headaches or migraines can be challenging. Nutritionists and dieticians recommend keeping a food journal to keep track of foods, snacks, drinks, alcohol intake, how the body reacts, and how the individual feels.

 

  • This process can help recognize foods or eating patterns that may contribute to headaches.
  • An integrative health practitioner can support this process and help identify sensitivities.
  • By eliminating and avoiding processed foods, headaches may be alleviated. This includes limited exposure to artificial colors, sweeteners, flavors, and other unnatural additives.

Histamine

  • Histamines can also be triggers for headaches.
  • Histamine is a vasoactive amine that induces mucus production, blood vessel dilation, and bronchoconstriction.
  • Histamine is in most body tissues, like the nose, sinuses, skin, blood cells, and lungs. But pollen, dander, dust mites, etc., can release histamine.

Dehydration

  • Dehydration can affect all of the body and cognitive functions.
  • Hydrating regularly can prevent headaches and relieve pain.
  • An easy way to test the cause of headaches is to consider drinking plenty of water/hydrating before any other relief option.
  • Drinking pure water with no additives is the quickest and easiest way to hydrate your body.
  • Eat foods with high water content for enhanced hydration, including citrus fruits, cucumbers, melons, zucchini, celery, spinach, and kale.

Toxic Chemicals

  • Toxic chemicals are found in all kinds of products.
  • Cleaning products, make-up, shampoo, and other products have been found to contain chemicals that can worsen headaches and even cause migraines.
  • Consider using natural products and educating on toxic chemicals to know what to look for in everyday products.

Natural Options

Consider a few natural supplements to ease headaches.

Magnesium

  • Magnesium deficiency has been linked to headaches.
  • Foods naturally high in magnesium include legumes, almonds, broccoli, spinach, avocados, dried figs, and bananas.

Ginger Root

  • Ginger root is a natural remedy for nausea, diarrhea, upset stomach, and indigestion.
  • Ginger root extract can be taken in supplement form or fresh ginger added to meals and teas.

Coriander Seeds

  • Coriander syrup is effective against migraine pain.
  • A method to relieve a headache is to pour hot water over fresh seeds and inhale the steam.
  • To increase the effectiveness, place a towel over your head.

Celery or Celery Seed Oil

  • Celery can reduce inflammation and lower blood pressure.
  • However, pregnant women or individuals with kidney conditions, low blood pressure, taking thyroid medication, blood thinners, lithium, or diuretics should not use celery seed.

Peppermint and Lavender Essential Oils

  • Both have a natural numbing and cooling effect that helps relieve headache pain.
  • Peppermint oil has also been found to be a natural antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiparasitic, and pain reliever.
  • Lavender oil can eliminate nervous tension, enhance blood circulation, and relieve pain.
  • Both are effective pain relief tools for headache and migraine sufferers.

Butterbur

  • This shrub grows in Europe, some parts of Asia, and North America.
  • study found that individuals who consumed 75 mg of the extract twice daily reduced migraine attacks' frequency.

Feverfew

  • herb plant whose dried leaves have been found to relieve symptoms associated with headaches, migraines, menstrual cramps, asthma, dizziness, and arthritis.
  • Feverfew can be found in supplements.
  • It can alter the effects of certain prescription and non-prescription medications.

 

There is plenty of evidence to support the benefits of healthy nutrition. Combined with a healthy diet and lifestyle, these supplements can help relieve headaches. As with any supplement, talk to a doctor before starting a supplement regimen.

Chiropractic Care For Migraines

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Ariyanfar, Shadi, et al. "Review on Headache Related to Dietary Supplements." Current Pain and headache report vol. 26,3 (2022): 193-218. doi:10.1007/s11916-022-01019-9

 

Bryans, Roland, et al. "Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with headache." Journal of Manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 34,5 (2011): 274-89. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2011.04.008

 

Diener, H C et al. "The first placebo-controlled trial of a special butterbur root extract for the prevention of migraine: reanalysis of efficacy criteria." European Neurology vol. 51,2 (2004): 89-97. doi:10.1159/000076535

 

Kajjari, Shweta, et al. "The Effects of Lavender Essential Oil and its Clinical Implications in Dentistry: A Review." International Journal of clinical pediatric dentistry vol. 15,3 (2022): 385-388. doi:10.5005/jp-journals-10005-2378

 

Maier, Jeanette A et al. “Headaches and Magnesium: Mechanisms, Bioavailability, Therapeutic Efficacy and Potential Advantage of Magnesium Pidolate.” Nutrients vol. 12,9 2660. 31 Aug. 2020, doi:10.3390/nu12092660

 

Mansouri, Samaneh, et al. "Evaluating the effect of Coriandrum sativum syrup on being migraine-free using mixture models." Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran vol. 34 44. 6 May. 2020, doi:10.34171/mjiri.34.44

 

Pareek, Anil, et al. "Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.): A systematic review." Pharmacognosy Reviews vol. 5,9 (2011): 103-10. doi:10.4103/0973-7847.79105

 

Skypala, Isabel J et al. "Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence." Clinical and translational allergy vol. 5 34. 13 Oct. 2015, doi:10.1186/s13601-015-0078-3

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Individuals dealing with headaches or migraines should consider incorporating supplements to ease headaches' severity and frequency. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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What Happens To The Body After Eating Healthy: EP Chiropractic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

What Happens To The Body After Eating Healthy: EP Chiropractic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

What happens to the body after eating healthy? Individuals report the effects of healthy eating, feeling mentally clearer and more focused, increased energy levels, experiencing decreased junk food cravings and hunger pangs, improved sleep, and the benefits of strong bones, cardiovascular health, and disease prevention. The Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic Team can assist individuals working on making healthy lifestyle adjustments to make the transition easier and with professional support to streamline the process, allowing the individual to focus on getting healthy.

What Happens To The Body After Eating Healthy

It can take a little while for the body to adjust to a new nutrition plan. A healthy diet includes nutrient-dense foods from all the major food groups, including lean proteins, whole grains, healthy fats, and fruits and vegetables of various colors.

Benefits

The benefits of healthy eating include the following.

 

  • Longer life.
  • Maintains digestive health and system function.
  • Maintains whole body health.
  • Strengthens muscles.
  • Strengthens bones.
  • Increases immunity.
  • Promotes healthy pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • Decreases the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers.
  • Helps achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

One Week

  • Experience decreased food cravings throughout the day.
  • Junk food cravings decrease.
  • The body begins shedding all the excess water from a high sodium intake and processed foods.
  • Hunger starts to stabilize.
  • Experience decreased hunger pains, making losing weight a little easier.
  • Improved sleep.
  • Improved control over food choices.
  • Higher mental focus and clarity - brain fog or low concentration symptoms begin to clear.
  • Energy levels are higher, making completing daily activities and exercise easier.
  • The body will become regular with a lower amount of bloating and discomfort.
  • Moods become stable with fewer ups and downs throughout the day.

One Month

  • Improved skin health.
  • A steady rate of weight loss, depending on the approach and starting point.
  • Clothing begins to feel looser.
  • Pre-existing health problems like migraines, joint pain, irritable bowel issues, etc., may begin to clear up.
  • Eating right starts to become more habitual.
  • Making healthy choices starts to become second nature.
  • Improved physical performance.
  • Feel stronger and notice that the body recovers much faster.
  • Improved metabolism.
  • Can eat more without gaining body weight.

Six Months

  • A decrease in overall cholesterol levels if they were high before.
  • Blood pressure improvement, lowering the risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Strengthened skeletal system reducing the risk of stress fractures and breaks.
  • Improved blood glucose levels, reduced blood sugar fluctuations, and lowered risk factors for diabetes or symptoms are easier to manage.

 

All the positive changes will lead to staying naturally motivated, where eating healthy is just something you do, and you have learned to indulge wisely. All the benefits will persist for as long as you eat healthily. Target goals can be achieved with a body weight that makes you feel healthy, strong, and confident.

Basal Metabolism

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Bradbury, Kathryn E et al. “Fruit, vegetable, and fiber intake in relation to cancer risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).” The American journal of clinical nutrition vol. 100 Suppl 1 (2014): 394S-8S. doi:10.3945/ajcn.113.071357

 

Carlson, Justin L et al. “Health Effects and Sources of Prebiotic Dietary Fiber.” Current developments in nutrition vol. 2,3 nzy005. 29 Jan. 2018, doi:10.1093/cdn/nzy005

 

Hills, Ronald D Jr, et al. “Gut Microbiome: Profound Implications for Diet and Disease.” Nutrients vol. 11,7 1613. 16 Jul. 2019, doi:10.3390/nu11071613

 

Zohoori, F Vida. “Chapter 1: Nutrition and Diet.” Monographs in oral science vol. 28 (2020): 1-13. doi:10.1159/000455365

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

The Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic Team can assist individuals working on making healthy lifestyle adjustments. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Finding The Right Diet For Cardiometabolic Syndrome (Part 2) | Call: 915-850-0900

Finding The Right Diet For Cardiometabolic Syndrome (Part 2) | Call: 915-850-0900 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Introduction

Dr. Jimenez, D.C., presents how to find the right diet for cardiometabolic syndrome in this 2-part series. Many environmental factors often play a role in our health and wellness. In today’s presentation, we continue discussing how genes play with the cardiometabolic diet. Part 1 looked at how every body type is different and how the cardiometabolic diet plays its role. We mention our patients to certified medical providers that provide available therapy treatments for individuals suffering from chronic conditions associated with metabolic connections. We encourage each patient when it is appropriate by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis or needs. We understand and accept that education is a marvelous way when asking our providers’ crucial questions at the patient’s request and acknowledgment. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., uses this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

 

Omega-3s & Genes

Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., presents: We’ve found that fish oils or omega-3s can lower triglycerides, small-density LDL, and sometimes lower LDL and keep HDL regulated. But these studies were back when they were supplementing with more of an even DHA/EPA ratio. But that’s something to be observant of; the study showed that giving them fish oil lowers their small density LDL and triglycerides. They also found that if they gave them a lower fat food plan, and a lower fat diet, they found it lowered their LDL and small density LDL. A moderate fat diet reduced their LDL, but it increased their small density LDL. And they found that average alcohol consumption lowered their HDL and increased their LDL. So that’s not a good sign when that happens. So the opposite of what you want to occur with a moderate alcohol consumption diet or food plan.

 

So going back to APO-E4 in the body, how would this gene be affected when dealing with viral infections like herpes or cold sores? So research studies have revealed that APO-E4 and herpes simplex one viruses can affect the brain’s cerebral tissues. So the research also indicates that patients with APO-E4 are more susceptible to getting the herpes virus. And remember, herpes simplex one virus is what causes cold sores. What about HSV and dementia? How would that correlate with the body? The research indicates that HSV increases the risk of dementia. And what the thought is is that just like the herpes virus can come out and cause cold sores, it can internally manifest, and you can get these episodes where HSV becomes active in the brain, which can cause some of the pathogenesis of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

 

APO-E & Finding The Right Diet

Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., presents: And there was a study that showed that if you gave patients with dementia antivirals, it decreased the risk of getting dementia. So what do we do with the APO-E genotype? If you have APO-E2, APO-E3, or APO-E4, you can start them on the cardiometabolic food plan. If they’re on the SAD diet, the standard American diet, then putting them on the cardiometabolic food plan is just a good idea. It’s going to start shifting them in the right direction. What about additional consideration if they have APO-E3/4 and APO-E4/4? There are a couple of reasons you should jump in on this. They like it more when you customize a diet to a patient’s genetics. So if you can say, listen, we have your genes, and we know that you would do better if you had lower saturated fat, or if you don’t do so well on alcohol X, Y, or Z, it makes them pay attention more.

 

Because now it’s personalized. It’s not like, “Hey, everybody, just eat healthily.” It’s more personalized to your genetics. So, that would be a reason to start this from the get-go. But get them on the cardiometabolic food plan, and they should begin to feel better. But we would start by putting the whole thing in perspective that this APO-E3/4 and APO-E4/4 is not a death sentence. It’s a clue of how you respond to your environment and what we need to watch out for. It does not mean that you are going to get Alzheimer’s. The majority of people with Alzheimer’s do not have APO-E4. You have a higher risk of getting Alzheimer’s if you have APO-E4. And that’s where functional medicine comes in to risk-stratify them.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez explains how many people are finding the right diet for cardiometabolic syndrome to improve their health. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

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Why Magnesium Is Important For Your Health? (Part 3) | Call: 915-850-0900

Why Magnesium Is Important For Your Health? (Part 3) | Call: 915-850-0900 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Introduction

Nowadays, many individuals are incorporating various fruits, vegetables, lean portions of meat, and healthy fats and oils into their diet to get all the vitamins and minerals that their bodies need. The body needs these nutrients biotransformed into energy for the muscles, joints, and vital organs. When normal factors like eating unhealthy foods, not getting enough exercise, and underlying conditions affect the body, it can cause somato-visceral issues that correlate with disorders that push many individuals to feel unwell and miserable. Luckily, some supplements and vitamins like magnesium help with overall health and can reduce the effects of these environmental factors that are causing pain-like symptoms in the body. In this 3-part series, we will look at the impact of magnesium helping the body and what foods contain magnesium. Part 1 looks at how magnesium correlates with heart health. Part 2 looks at how magnesium helps with blood pressure. We refer our patients to certified medical providers that provide many available therapy treatments for individuals suffering from underlying conditions associated with low magnesium levels affecting the body and correlated to many underlying conditions affecting a person’s health and wellness. We encourage each patient when it is appropriate by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis. We accept that education is a marvelous way when asking our providers’ hard-hitting questions at the patient’s request and acknowledgment. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., only utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

 

An Overview Of Magnesium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you been experiencing muscle numbness in different locations in your body? What about muscle cramps or fatigue? Or have you been experiencing issues with your heart? Suppose you have been dealing with these overlapping issues that are affecting not only your body but your overall health. In that case, it could correlate with your body’s low magnesium levels. Studies reveal that this essential supplement is the body’s fourth most abundant cation when it comes to magnesium since it is a co-factor for multiple enzymic reactions. Magnesium helps with cellular energy metabolism, so the muscles and vital organs can function properly and helps replenish intracellular and extracellular water intake. Magnesium helps with the body’s metabolism, but it can also help reduce the effects of chronic conditions affecting the body. 

 

How Magnesium Helps The Body

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional studies reveal that magnesium is important in lowering chronic conditions’ effects on the body. Magnesium could help many individuals dealing with cardiovascular issues or chronic diseases associated with the heart or the muscles surrounding the upper and lower extremities of the body. How can magnesium help with overlapping health disorders that can affect the body? Studies show that taking magnesium can help prevent and treat many common health conditions:

  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Diabetes
  • Headaches
  • Cardiac arrhythmias

Many of these conditions are associated with everyday factors that can affect the body and lead to chronic disorders that can cause pain to the muscles, joints, and vital organs. So, taking magnesium can reduce pre-existing conditions from elevating the body and causing more harm.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez explains why magnesium is important for your health in this 3-part series. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

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Discover the Benefits and Uses of Almond Flour | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Discover the Benefits and Uses of Almond Flour | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals practicing a low-carbohydrate eating style or want to try an alternative flour, can incorporating almond flour help in their wellness journey?

Almond Flour

Almond flour and almond meal are gluten-free alternatives to wheat products in certain recipes. They are made by grinding almonds and can be bought prepared or made at home with a food processor or grinder. The flour is higher in protein and lower in starch than other gluten-free flour.

Almond Flour and Almond Meal

The flour is made with blanched almonds, meaning the skin has been removed. Almond meal is made with whole or blanched almonds. The consistency for both is more like corn meal than wheat flour. They can usually be used interchangeably, although using the blanched flour will produce a more refined, less grainy result. Superfine almond flour is great for baking cakes but is difficult to make at home. It can be found at grocery stores or ordered online.

Carbohydrates and Calories

A half cup of commercially prepared flour contains about:

 

  1. The glycemic index of almond flour is less than 1, which means it should have little effect on raising blood glucose levels.
  2. The high glycemic index of whole wheat flour is 71, and rice flour is 98.

Using Almond Flour

It is recommended for making gluten-free quick bread recipes, such as gluten-free:

 

  • Muffins
  • Pumpkin bread
  • Pancakes
  • Some cake recipes

 

Individuals are recommended to start with a recipe already adapted for almond flour and then make their own. A cup of wheat flour weighs around 3 ounces, while a cup of almond flour weighs almost 4 ounces. This will make a significant difference in baked goods. The flour is beneficial for adding nutrients to foods.

Almond Meal

  • Almond meal can be cooked as polenta or grits such as shrimp and grits.
  • Cookies can be made gluten-free with almond meal.
  • Almond meal biscuits can be made, but pay attention to the recipe.
  • Almond meal can be used to bread fish and other fried foods, but it must be taken care of so as not to burn.
  • Almond meal is not recommended for breads that require true dough with a developed gluten structure, like wheat flour.
  • More eggs are needed when baking with almond meal to provide the structure gluten in flour creates.

 

Adapting recipes to substitute almond meal for wheat flour can be a challenge that requires plenty of trial and error.

Sensitivities

Almonds are a tree nut, one of the eight most common food allergies. (Anaphylaxis UK. 2023) While peanuts are not tree nuts, many with peanut allergies can also have an almond allergy.

Making Your Own

It can be made in a blender or food processor.

 

  • Care must be taken not to grind it too long, or it will become almond butter, which can also be used.
  • Add a little at a time and pulse until it is ground into meal.
  • Store unused flour immediately in the refrigerator or freezer because it will go rancid quickly if left out.
  • Almonds are shelf-stable, and almond flour is not, so it is recommended that you grind only what is needed for the recipe.

Store Bought

Most health food stores sell almond flour, and more supermarkets are stocking it as it has become a popular gluten-free product. Packaged flour and meal will also go rancid after opening and should be kept in the refrigerator or freezer after opening.

Integrative Medicine

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

USDA FoodData Central. (2019). Almond Flour. Retrieved from https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/603980/nutrients

 

Anaphylaxis UK. (2023). Allergy Factsheets (Anaphylaxis UK A brighter future for people with serious allergies, Issue. https://www.anaphylaxis.org.uk/factsheets/

 

Atkinson, F. S., Brand-Miller, J. C., Foster-Powell, K., Buyken, A. E., & Goletzke, J. (2021). International tables of glycemic index and glycemic load values 2021: a systematic review. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 114(5), 1625–1632. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab233

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Looking for gluten-free alternatives? Try almond flour and almond meal. Learn how they're made and how to use them in your favorite recipes. For answers to any questions you may have, call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Discover the Benefits of Green Powder Supplements | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Discover the Benefits of Green Powder Supplements | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals that have a difficult time getting plenty of fruits and vegetables, can incorporating green powder supplements increase nutritional levels for a balanced diet?

Green Powder Supplements

Meeting daily nutrient needs through whole, unprocessed foods can't always be met when access is limited or for other reasons. A green powder supplement is a great way to fill in the gaps. Green powder supplements are a daily supplement that helps increase vitamin, mineral, and fiber intake and enhances overall health. Green powders are easy to mix in water with a favorite beverage or smoothie or bake into a recipe. They can help:

 

  • Increase energy
  • Nourish the immune system
  • Improve digestion
  • Promote mental clarity
  • Contribute to healthy blood sugar levels
  • Reduce the risk of chronic disease
  • Promote optimal liver and kidney function

What Are They?

  • Green powder supplements are forms of vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, phytochemicals, and other bioactive compounds.
  • They are derived from fruits, vegetables, herbs, and algae to combine ingredients into a convenient supplement. (Giulia Lorenzoni et al., 2019)

Nutrients

Because most green powders comprise a combination of ingredients, the nutrient density is high. Green powder supplements can be considered a vitamin and mineral product. They typically contain:

 

  • Vitamins A, C, and K
  • Iron
  • Magnesium
  • Calcium
  • Antioxidants

 

The recommended daily intake of vitamins and minerals can be helpful for individuals with limited access to produce or who want to supplement their diet with additional nutrients.

Energy

The phytochemicals found in fruits and vegetables have been shown to improve energy levels. Studies on their effects on physical performance and endurance have resulted in positive outcomes. Researchers found that phytonutrients like those in green powders helped to increase energy, improve agility, reduce fatigue perception, improve memory, and decrease recovery time. (Nicolas Monjotin et al., 2022)

Digestive Health

Green powders are rich in soluble and insoluble fiber, which contribute to feeling full and satisfied after a meal and are important for healthy digestion and regular bowel movements. Eating fiber-rich foods is associated with optimal blood sugar control and improved gut microbiota diversity. These factors are important for maintaining a healthy body weight and decreasing the risk of chronic disease, for example, type 2 diabetes. (Thomas M. Barber et al., 2020) Phytochemicals, including flavonoids, have been shown to have therapeutic effects on gas, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea associated with IBS. Other phytonutrients have been shown to reduce certain symptoms of ulcerative colitis. (Nicolas Monjotin et al., 2022)

Immune System Function

Supplemental green powder supplements have shown the ability to maintain a healthy immune system and reduce inflammation by their antioxidant content. Green powders containing seaweed or algae are rich in phytochemical and poly-unsaturated fatty acids that have antioxidant properties to reduce inflammation and prevent oxidative damage to cells. (Agnieszka Jaworowska, Aliza Murtaza 2022) A randomized trial found that a fruit, berry, and vegetable powder concentrate blend decreased oxidation and reduced inflammation, attributed to the phytochemicals found in fruits and vegetables.(Manfred Lamprecht et al., 2013)

Detoxification

The liver and kidneys are the main organs of natural detoxification. The liver helps the body absorb nutrients from consumed foods and removes waste and toxins through the kidneys. (National Library of Medicine. 2016) Plants are packed with antioxidants and phytochemicals that protect the liver and kidneys from free radical damage and oxidative stress. (Yong-Song Guan et al., 2015) The green powder supplements are made from these plants. When drinking green powders, fluid intake naturally increases as a standard serving of green powder is mixed with 8 to 12 ounces of water.

 

Whether mixed, blended, or made into a shake, powdered greens are a convenient and efficient way to get the daily dose of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients.

The Healing Diet: Combat Inflammation, Embrace Wellness

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Lorenzoni, G., Minto, C., Vecchio, M. G., Zec, S., Paolin, I., Lamprecht, M., Mestroni, L., & Gregori, D. (2019). Fruit and Vegetable Concentrate Supplementation and Cardiovascular Health: A Systematic Review from a Public Health Perspective. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8(11), 1914. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111914

 

Monjotin, N., Amiot, M. J., Fleurentin, J., Morel, J. M., & Raynal, S. (2022). Clinical Evidence of the Benefits of Phytonutrients in Human Healthcare. Nutrients, 14(9), 1712. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091712

 

Barber, T. M., Kabisch, S., Pfeiffer, A. F. H., & Weickert, M. O. (2020). The Health Benefits of Dietary Fibre. Nutrients, 12(10), 3209. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103209

 

Jaworowska, A., & Murtaza, A. (2022). Seaweed Derived Lipids Are a Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agent: A Review. International journal of environmental research and public health, 20(1), 730. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010730

 

Lamprecht, M., Obermayer, G., Steinbauer, K., Cvirn, G., Hofmann, L., Ledinski, G., Greilberger, J. F., & Hallstroem, S. (2013). Supplementation with a juice powder concentrate and exercise decrease oxidation and inflammation, and improve the microcirculation in obese women: randomized controlled trial data. The British journal of nutrition, 110(9), 1685–1695. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114513001001

 

InformedHealth.org [Internet]. Cologne, Germany: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG); 2006-. How does the liver work? 2009 Sep 17 [Updated 2016 Aug 22]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279393/

 

Guan, Y. S., He, Q., & Ahmad Al-Shatouri, M. (2015). Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Liver Diseases 2014. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine: eCAM, 2015, 476431. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/476431

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Discover the benefits of green powder supplements: increase energy, support immune health, improve digestion, and more. For answers to any questions you may have, call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Unlock the Heart Health Benefits of Prunes - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Unlock the Heart Health Benefits of Prunes - EP Wellness & Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals looking to improve heart health, can consuming prunes help support cardiovascular health?

Prunes and Heart Health

Prunes, or dried plums, are fiber-rich fruits that are more nutrient-dense than fresh plums and help digestion and bowel movement. (Ellen Lever et al., 2019) New research suggests they could offer more than digestion and constipation relief, according to new studies presented at the American Society for Nutrition. Eating prunes daily can improve cholesterol levels and reduce oxidative stress and inflammation.

 

  • Eating five to 10 prunes a day may support heart health.
  • Heart health benefits of regular consumption were seen in men.
  • In older women, regularly eating prunes had no negative effect on total cholesterol, blood sugar, and insulin levels.
  • Another study found that eating 50–100 grams or five to ten prunes daily was associated with reduced heart disease risks. (Mee Young Hong et al., 2021)
  • The reductions in cholesterol and inflammation markers were because of improvements in antioxidant levels.
  • The conclusion was that prunes can support cardiovascular health.

Prunes and Fresh Plums

Although studies have suggested that prunes can support heart health, that doesn’t mean fresh plums or prune juice can offer the same benefits. However, there are not many studies on the benefits of fresh plums or prune juice, but it is possible that they would. However, further research is needed. Fresh plums that have been dried in hot air improve the nutritional value and shelf life of the fruit, which could be the reason the dried version retains more nutrients. (Harjeet Singh Brar et al., 2020)

 

  • Individuals may have to eat more plums to acquire the same benefits.
  • Eating 5–10 prunes seems to be easier than trying to equal the same amount, or more, of fresh plums.
  • But either option is recommended instead of prune juice as whole fruits have more fiber, make the body feel fuller, and are lower in calories.

Benefits For Young Individuals

Most of the research has been conducted on postmenopausal women and men over 55, but younger individuals can also benefit from eating prunes. A diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables is considered healthy, so adding prunes to one's diet will add to health benefits. For individuals who don’t like prunes, fruits like apples and berries are also recommended for heart health. However, fruits only make up one part of the diet, and it is important to focus on a balanced diet with vegetables, legumes, and heart-healthy oils. Prunes contain a lot of fiber, so individuals are recommended to add them slowly into their daily routine, as adding too much at once can lead to cramping, bloating, and/or constipation.

Conquering Congestive Heart Failure

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to discuss the subject matter above further, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Lever, E., Scott, S. M., Louis, P., Emery, P. W., & Whelan, K. (2019). The effect of prunes on stool output, gut transit time and gastrointestinal microbiota: A randomised controlled trial. Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 38(1), 165–173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2018.01.003

 

Hong, M. Y., Kern, M., Nakamichi-Lee, M., Abbaspour, N., Ahouraei Far, A., & Hooshmand, S. (2021). Dried Plum Consumption Improves Total Cholesterol and Antioxidant Capacity and Reduces Inflammation in Healthy Postmenopausal Women. Journal of medicinal food, 24(11), 1161–1168. https://doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2020.0142

 

Harjeet Singh Brar, Prabhjot Kaur, Jayasankar Subramanian, Gopu R. Nair & Ashutosh Singh (2020) Effect of Chemical Pretreatment on Drying Kinetics and Physio-chemical Characteristics of Yellow European Plums, International Journal of Fruit Science, 20:sup2, S252-S279, DOI: 10.1080/15538362.2020.1717403

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Eating prunes daily can reduce digestion and bowel movement issues, cholesterol, and inflammation and improve heart health. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Muscle Growth: Nutrition, Genetics, and Training Explained | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Muscle Growth: Nutrition, Genetics, and Training Explained | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals trying to build muscle but are not seeing results, can knowing factors like what foods to eat, how to work out, and genetics help achieve meaningful muscle gains?

Muscle Growth Nutritional Mistakes

Muscle growth is an important element of overall fitness and health. Individuals can make nutritional mistakes like not eating enough protein or carbohydrates and not properly hydrating themselves which can prevent them from gaining muscle. Factors that contribute to muscle building, include:

 

  • Nutrition
  • Genetics
  • Training

 

Individuals who want to increase muscle mass more efficiently can rework these issues to maintain consistency and commitment to exercise and nutrition. Benefits include:

 

  • Building muscle helps strengthen bones
  • Improves balance
  • Decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

 

Building muscle enhances strength and speed and can also reduce the risk of injuries or falls as you age. (American College of Sports Medicine. 2017)

Factors

Experts point out some common mistakes that can hinder muscle growth, like not eating enough protein, not consuming enough calories, overtraining, or practicing improper form and technique. As everybody is different there is no one-size-fits-all approach to building muscle or hypertrophy. These include:

Genetics

  • An individual's genes contribute to how easy or difficult it can be to build muscle.
  • Some individuals have a higher proportion of fast-twitch muscle fibers, which increases growth potential.
  • The natural distribution of muscle and body fat also varies and can affect the rate and location of muscle growth.
  • There are also differences in individual recovery capabilities that can influence the frequency and intensity of training sessions.

Nutrition

  • Nutrition matters when trying to build muscle. Individuals need to eat enough protein for muscle repair and growth.
  • Individuals may need to consume more calories than they burn to create energy stores.
  • At the same time, individuals need to consume enough carbohydrates and healthy fats to fuel workouts and recovery.

Training

  • Gaining muscle requires regular resistance or strength training exercises.
  • These exercises cause micro tears in muscle fibers, which then repair and grow back stronger and larger.
  • Effective resistance training includes - consistency, intensity, recovery, and progressive overload.
  • Progressive overload means gradually increasing the weight, frequency, or number of repetitions in an exercise routine to challenge the muscles.

Muscle Strength for Healthy Aging

  • Research shows that performing exercises that build muscle mass can slow age-related cognitive decline and decrease the risk of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. (Joseph Michael Northey, et al., 2018)
  • Muscle-building exercise can also improve heart health and lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases. (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2023)

Nutritional Mistakes

When trying to gain muscle, challenges can affect progress. Some of the most common mistakes that can delay or set back muscle growth and recommendations include.

Not Enough Protein

  • Eating protein like lean meats, dairy products, and seafood, is crucial for muscle repair and growth.
  • Not consuming enough protein makes the body unable to grow muscles, and you’ll see suboptimal improvements.
  • Get enough protein from various sources like beef, lamb, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, dairy, legumes, and plant-based proteins.
  • However, there is a limit to how much protein the body can use effectively at one time for muscle protein synthesis.
  • It is recommended to distribute protein intake evenly throughout the day, aiming for about 20 to 30 grams of high-quality protein in each meal.

Not Enough Calories

  • Muscles need calories to grow.
  • If the body is in a caloric deficit, the ability to grow muscle is limited.
  • Insufficient calorie intake can create energy deficits, making the body use muscle for energy instead of growing.
  • To fix this, individuals need to consume more calories than calories burned.
  • It can be helpful to track calorie intake with an application to make adjustments as needed.
  • Individuals having trouble increasing their calorie intake or there are questions about what the body needs, consult with a registered dietitian or nutritionist.

Not Enough Carbs

  • Carbohydrates are the body’s main energy source during high-intensity workouts.
  • Not consuming enough can lead to decreased performance and slower recovery.
  • Recommendations include consuming a variety of whole grains and minimally processed carbohydrates, such as brown rice, potatoes, sweet potatoes, oats, and quinoa.
  • For individuals doing regular, moderate-to-intense training, carbohydrate recommendations can range from 3 to 7 grams per kilogram of body weight per day.
  • For individuals doing endurance or intense frequency training routines may need to increase this range.

Not Hydrating Enough

  • Water is necessary for all bodily functions, including muscle contraction and repair.
  • Dehydration comes with symptoms like muscle cramps, fatigue, and decreased exercise performance. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2022)
  • For individuals who are not sure how much water they need? Recommendations include using half of an individual's body weight as a starting point to figure out how many ounces to drink per day.
  • For example, individuals who weigh 140 pounds can set a baseline hydration goal of 70 ounces of water/8 cups per day which can be adjusted according to activities.

Water Intake Recommendations

  • The recommended total fluid intake from food and drink varies by age and sex. The general recommendations are around:
  • 11.5 cups per day for women
  • 15.5 cups for adult men
  • For just water, women need around 9 cups of fluid per day, and men need around 13 cups to replace fluids that are lost throughout the day.
  • However, the exact amount of water needed to stay properly hydrated also depends on an individual's activity level and overall health. (Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2022)
  • To prevent dehydration, sip water consistently throughout the day, especially before, during, and after workouts.
  • Foods with a high water content like certain fruits can help achieve daily hydration goals.

Not Enough Healthy Fats

  • Not consuming enough healthy fats can cause the body to not be able to produce enough hormones that support muscle growth.
  • Relying on supplements instead of getting nutrients from whole foods can also lead to nutritional deficiencies and imbalances.
  • Eating too many protein bars or shakes can also cause gastrointestinal side effects. (National Capital Poison Center. 2023)
  • Recommendations are to add more healthy fats, like avocados, nuts, seeds, fatty fish, and olive oil.

Forgetting Post-Workout Nutrition

  • After working out, the body is ready to absorb nutrients and start the process of muscle repair and growth.
  • The body needs nutrients to activate the recovery post-exercise
  • When the body lacks nutrition after a workout it can slow muscle growth and cause fatigue.
  • Recommendations are to pack a balance of protein and carbohydrates to refuel right after a workout.

Training Mistakes

  • Undertraining or performing low-intensity workouts can also slow down muscle growth.
  • Individuals who are not overloading their muscles - for example, using weights that are too light - will not break them down so they can grow bigger and stronger.
  • A lack of microdamage means muscle growth will be slower.
  • Muscle overload also requires rest.
  • Recommendations are to take at least one day of rest per week and avoid strength training in the same muscle group two days in a row.
  • When creating a lifting plan, be sure to include compound exercises like squats, deadlifts, and bench presses.
  • These exercises work with multiple muscle groups and are recommended for building strength and muscle.
  • A training routine should include a variety of compound movements, like lunges, split squats, leg presses, pull-downs, upright rows, and push-ups.
  • If unsure of which compound exercises to include, consult a personal trainer, physical therapist, or sports chiropractor.

Military Training and Chiropractic Care

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

American College of Sports Medicine. (2017). Resistance training and injury prevention.

 

Northey, J. M., Cherbuin, N., Pumpa, K. L., Smee, D. J., & Rattray, B. (2018). Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50: a systematic review with meta-analysis. British journal of sports medicine, 52(3), 154–160. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-096587

 

Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2023). Exercise and the heart.

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022). Water and healthier drinks.

 

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (2022). How much water do you need?

 

National Capital Poison Center. (2023). Do protein bars give you gas?

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Learn how to maximize muscle growth with proper nutrition, exercise, and form. Uncover common mistakes that can prevent muscle growth. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Onions: Natural Health Enhancers | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Onions: Natural Health Enhancers | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals looking to maintain wellness or begin their wellness journey like increasing antioxidants, protection against cancer, immune system support and other health benefits, can adding onions be a nutritious way to improve overall health?

Onions

Onions are nutritious vegetables like garlic, chives, leeks, and shallots. The most common types are red, white, yellow, and Spanish onions. They have antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other healthful properties.

 

  • Whichever way they are prepared they do lose some of their nutritional value when cooked.
  • They contain flavonoids, glutathione, selenium compounds, vitamin E, and vitamin C.
  • When selecting onions, look for those without blemishes or discoloration, that are firm, and have dry, papery skins.

Benefits

They contain phytochemicals - compounds plants produce to fight off harmful bacteria, viruses, and fungi. These phytochemicals provide health benefits when consumed and provide the following properties: (Xin-Xin Zhao, et al., 2021)

 

  • Anti-obesity
  • Antioxidants
  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antimicrobial
  • Anticancer
  • Protect the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, reproductive, and neurological systems.
  • Protect against liver disease.
  • Support a healthy immune system.

Types and Varieties

They belong to the Allium plant genus which includes plants like garlic, leeks, and chives. (Oregon State University. 2022)

 

  • They vary in flavor and can be sweet, tangy, and sour.
  • Different varieties combined with farming practices contribute to the flavor profile of onions.
  • There are many varieties of onions.
  • The most common and widely available are red, white, yellow, and Spanish.
  • Other types include cipollini, pearl, and Vidalia.

Raw or Cooked

They are beneficial whether eaten raw or cooked, cooking them reduces the number of thiosulfinates - compounds that provide antimicrobial, antifungal, and antibiotic properties.

 

  • Research shows that onions that are crushed before cooking retain their health benefits. (Holly L. Nicastro, et al., 2015)
  • Boiling and frying onions has been shown to cause the most significant loss in nutritious value.
  • Other preparation methods that decrease health benefits include sautéing, steaming, and microwaving.
  • Baking onions is shown to increase flavonoid levels.
  • Consuming dried, powdered onions can also provide nutritious value to foods, especially if the powder is freeze-dried. (Damini Kothari, et al., 2020)

Nutrition Facts

Onions can contribute to a healthy diet. The flavonoids, glutathione, selenium compounds, vitamin E, and vitamin C, contribute to the antioxidant properties of the vegetable. (Holly L. Nicastro, et al., 2015) The nutrition information for one medium onion: (U.S. Department of Agriculture. N.D.)

 

  • Total calories: 44
  • Total fat: 0 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 milligrams
  • Carbohydrates: 10 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 2 grams
  • Total sugars: 5 grams
  • Protein: 1 grams
  • Calcium: 2 milligrams
  • Sodium: 4 milligrams
  • Iron: 1 milligrams
  • Vitamin D: 0 micrograms

When Selecting

Onions can contain pesticide residue, heavy metals, microbial contamination, and nitrate accumulation. Knowing where the onions come from can help ensure there was no incorrect use of pesticides or that the soil they were grown in was not enriched with heavy metals. When possible, purchase from reputable sources with transparent farming practices, like the farmers markets. (Xin-Xin Zhao, et al., 2021)

 

  • Onions found in environments that have not been effectively sterilized have an increased risk of growing harmful bacteria.
  • To avoid contamination of Escherichia. coli or E. coli, salmonella, and mold, it's safest to purchase whole onions and cut them at home rather than purchasing pre-chopped onions. (Xin-Xin Zhao, et al., 2021)
  • Select those that feel firm, have little to no bruises or discolored spots, and have dry papery skin.
  • Avoid those that show evidence of mold, like white or black spots on the surface or inside the layers, and those with green shoots, which means the onion is still edible but won't last that long.

Hypertension Diet

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Zhao, X. X., Lin, F. J., Li, H., Li, H. B., Wu, D. T., Geng, F., Ma, W., Wang, Y., Miao, B. H., & Gan, R. Y. (2021). Recent Advances in Bioactive Compounds, Health Functions, and Safety Concerns of Onion (Allium cepa L.). Frontiers in nutrition, 8, 669805. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2021.669805

 

Oregon State University. Types of onions and varieties.

 

Nicastro, H. L., Ross, S. A., & Milner, J. A. (2015). Garlic and onions: their cancer prevention properties. Cancer prevention research (Philadelphia, Pa.), 8(3), 181–189. https://doi.org/10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-14-0172

 

Kothari, D., Lee, W. D., & Kim, S. K. (2020). Allium Flavonols: Health Benefits, Molecular Targets, and Bioavailability. Antioxidants (Basel, Switzerland), 9(9), 888. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090888

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture. Onions.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Onions can help protect our cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, reproductive, and neurological systems. Discover the healthful properties! For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Peanut Butter Sandwich Alternatives | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Peanut Butter Sandwich Alternatives | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

For individuals with peanut allergies, can finding a peanut alternative be as satisfying as a real creamy or crunchy peanut butter sandwich?

Peanut Butter Sandwich Alternatives

For individuals who are unable to have a peanut butter sandwich due to an allergy, there are healthy satisfying alternatives. Tree nut butter, seed butter, and deli meats can all satisfy sandwich cravings and provide nutrition. Here are a few healthy, nutritious alternatives to try out:

Sunflower Seed Butter and Jam, Jelly, or Preserves

Ham and Cheese, Grainy Mustard on Rye Bread

  • Getting ham and cheese from the deli can potentially have cross-contamination with allergens during slicing and packaging.
  • Prepackaged and sliced ham and cheese is a safer bet in terms of allergens.
  • It is recommended to read the ingredient label for potential allergens, as processing in facilities can have cross-contamination issues. (William J. Sheehan, et al., 2018)

Turkey, Tomato, Lettuce, and Hummus on Whole Grain Bread

  • The same is true for turkey and is recommended to buy prepackaged and sliced.
  • Check the ingredients for possible allergens.
  • Hummus is made from chickpeas/garbanzo beans and tahini/ground sesame seeds.
  • Hummus comes in a variety of flavors that can be used as a dip or spread.
  • Although chick peas' are a member of the legume family, hummus can be tolerated with peanut allergies. (Mathias Cousin, et al., 2017)
  • Check with a healthcare provider if unsure.

Pita Pocket with Salad and Hummus 

  • Pita pockets are great with hummus stuffed with vegetables.
  • This is a delicious crunchy pocket sandwich loaded with protein, fiber vitamins, and minerals.

Soy Butter and Banana Slices on Whole Wheat Bread

  • Soy butter is a popular alternative to peanut butter. (Kalyani Gorrepati, et al., 2014)
  • Made from soybeans, the butter is full of fiber, protein, and healthy fats.
  • The butter can be spread on whole wheat bread and topped with banana slices for breakfast or lunch.

Tahini Sesame Seed Butter On A Roll with Shredded Broccoli and Carrots

  • Tahini is made from sesame seeds.
  • It can be spread on a roll with shredded broccoli and carrots for a healthy crunchy, fiber-rich, protein-filled sandwich.

Almond Butter and Sliced Apples

  • Try a non-sandwich option for lunch or as a snack.
  • This butter is made from almonds, which are tree nuts.
  • Almond butter is rich in fiber, vitamin E, and healthy fats.
  • Almonds contain the most nutrients per calorie of tree nuts. (Almond Board of California. 2015)

Cashew Butter on an English Muffin with Raisins

  • This butter is made from cashews, a tree nut, so it is safe for individuals with peanut allergies but not for individuals with nut allergies. (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2020)
  • Cashew butter on a hot English muffin with raisins on top for a boost of iron is reminiscent of a cinnamon roll.

Pumpkin Seed Butter and Honey Sandwich

  • Pumpkin butter is made from the orange flesh of the pumpkin.
  • Pumpkin seed butter is made by roasting pumpkin seeds and grinding them to a butter consistency.
  • The seed butter can be spread on bread and drizzled with some honey on top for a nutritious and delicious snack.

 

There are tasty healthy peanut butter alternatives that can be mixed, matched, and reinvented into various satisfying sandwiches. Individuals are recommended to consult their healthcare provider or a dietician or nutritionist to find what works for them.

Smart Choices, Better Health

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Lavine, E., & Ben-Shoshan, M. (2015). Allergy to sunflower seed and sunflower butter as a proposed vehicle for sensitization. Allergy, asthma, and clinical immunology: Official Journal of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 11(1), 2. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13223-014-0065-6

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture: FoodData Central. Seeds, sunflower seed butter, with salt added (Includes foods for USDA's Food Distribution Program).

 

Sheehan, W. J., Taylor, S. L., Phipatanakul, W., & Brough, H. A. (2018). Environmental Food Exposure: What Is the Risk of Clinical Reactivity From Cross-Contact and What Is the Risk of Sensitization. The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice, 6(6), 1825–1832. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2018.08.001

 

Gorrepati, K., Balasubramanian, S., & Chandra, P. (2015). Plant-based butters. Journal of food science and technology, 52(7), 3965–3976. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-014-1572-7

 

Cousin, M., Verdun, S., Seynave, M., Vilain, A. C., Lansiaux, A., Decoster, A., & Sauvage, C. (2017). Phenotypical characterization of peanut-allergic children with differences in cross-allergy to tree nuts and other legumes. Pediatric allergy and immunology: Official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 28(3), 245–250. https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.12698

 

Almond Board of California. Nutrient comparison chart for tree nuts.

 

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Everything you need to know about a tree nut allergy.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

For individuals with peanut allergies, can finding a peanut alternative be as satisfying as a real creamy or crunchy peanut butter sandwich? For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Food Energy Density: EP's Functional Chiropractic Team | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Food Energy Density: EP's Functional Chiropractic Team | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

The brain and body need macronutrients that include carbohydrates, fats, and protein in the right amounts to energize the body. About half of the calories should come from carbohydrates, 30% from fat, and 20% from protein. Food energy density is the amount of energy, represented by the number of calories, in a specific weight measurement.

Food Energy Density

Energy density is determined by the proportion of macronutrients - protein, fat, carbohydrates, fiber, and water.

 

  • Energy-dense foods are high in calories per serving.
  • Foods with large amounts of fiber and water have a lower density.
  • Foods high in fat have an increased energy density.
  • An example of a high-energy-density food is a donut because of the high-calorie count from the sugar, fat, and small serving size.
  • An example of a low-energy-density food is spinach because it only has a few calories in a whole plate of raw spinach leaves.

Energy Dense Foods

Energy-dense foods contain a high number of calories/energy per gram. They are typically higher in fat and lower in water. Examples of energy-dense foods include:

 

  • Full-fat dairy
  • Butter
  • Cheese
  • Nut butter
  • Fatty cuts of meat
  • Starchy vegetables
  • Thick sauces
  • Nuts
  • Seeds

 

Less nutrient-dense foods include:

 

  • Sweets
  • Deep-fried foods
  • French fries
  • Pasta
  • Crackers
  • Chips

 

Foods like soups and beverages can be either high or low energy density depending on the ingredients. Broth-based soups with vegetables usually have low density while creamed soups are energy-dense. Non-fat milk is less dense than regular milk, and diet soda is less dense than regular soda.

Low Energy Dense Foods

  • Foods with low energy density include high-fiber green and colorful vegetables.
  • Foods with low energy density are often nutrient-dense, which means they have plenty of nutrients per serving size.
  • Many fruits, berries, and vegetables are low in calories, high in fiber, and packed with vitamins and minerals.
  • Foods high in water content like citrus fruits and melons are usually less energy-dense.
  • Low-calorie foods often have a low energy density, but not always.
  • It's important to read nutrition labels to know how many calories are being provided daily.

Weight Management

  • Weight management is about watching how many calories are taken in and how many calories are burned.
  • Filling up on foods with low energy density will cause the body to feel satisfied while eating fewer high-density calories.
  • Plan all meals so they include foods with a low energy density and high in nutrients.
  • However, the opposite can happen if individuals eat mostly low-energy-dense foods, will need a larger volume of food to fill up, and as a result, will take in more calories.
  • This is not ideal for losing weight, but it could be helpful if trying to gain weight.
  • High-energy-dense foods that are nutritious include avocados, nuts, and seeds.

Adjustment Recommendations

Add More Fruits and Vegetables To The Plate

  • At least half of a plate should be covered with low-calorie fruits and vegetables.
  • Berries are sweet and delicious and provide antioxidants
  • Leave a quarter of the plate for the protein, and the remaining quarter can hold a serving of starchy foods like pasta, potatoes, or rice.
  • Eating more fruits and vegetables will partially fill the body leading to eating less high-energy-dense foods.
  • Picky eaters should try various recipes, sooner or later, they will discover something they enjoy.

Start With Salad or a Bowl of Clear Broth Soup

  • Soups and salads will fill the body before the main energy-dense course like pasta, pizza, or another high-calorie food.
  • Avoid heavy cream-based salad dressings and creamed soups.
  • Water has zero calories and drinking a few glasses can help suppress the hunger until the next meal, or a low-density snack.

From Consultation to Transformation 

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/nutrition/pdf/r2p_energy_density.pdf

 

Fernandez, Melissa Anne, and André Marette. “Potential Health Benefits of Combining Yogurt and Fruits Based on Their Probiotic and Prebiotic Properties.” Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) vol. 8,1 155S-164S. 17 Jan. 2017, doi:10.3945/an.115.011114

 

Horgan, Graham W et al. “Effect of different food groups on energy intake within and between individuals.” European Journal of Nutrition vol. 61,7 (2022): 3559-3570. doi:10.1007/s00394-022-02903-1

 

Hubbard, Gary P et al. “A systematic review of compliance to oral nutritional supplements.” Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) vol. 31,3 (2012): 293-312. doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2011.11.020

 

Prentice, A M. “Manipulation of dietary fat and energy density and subsequent effects on substrate flux and food intake.” The American Journal of clinical nutrition vol. 67,3 Suppl (1998): 535S-541S. doi:10.1093/ajcn/67.3.535S

 

Slesser, M. “Energy and food.” Basic life sciences vol. 7 (1976): 171-8. doi:10.1007/978-1-4684-2883-4_15

 

Specter, S E et al. “Reducing ice cream energy density does not condition decreased acceptance or engender compensation following repeated exposure.” European Journal of clinical nutrition vol. 52,10 (1998): 703-10. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1600627

 

Westerterp-Plantenga, M S. “Effects of the energy density of daily food intake on long-term energy intake.” Physiology & behavior vol. 81,5 (2004): 765-71. doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2004.04.030

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Food energy density is the amount of energy, represented by the number of calories, in a specific weight measurement. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Nutrients & Supplements For Nerve Repair With Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900

Nutrients & Supplements For Nerve Repair With Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Introduction

The central nervous system transmits information between the brain, muscles, and organs through 31 nerve roots from the spinal cord. These nerve roots are interconnected with the body’s muscles and organs, ensuring each body section is connected to the upper and lower extremities. The neuron signals transmitted through these nerve roots provide sympathetic and parasympathetic signaling, allowing the body and its systems to function correctly. However, injuries and pathogens affecting the nerve roots can cause the neuron signals to become unstable, involving the muscles, tissues, and vital organs and leading to chronic conditions and pain-like symptoms. Fortunately, small changes in diet and supplements can help reduce nerve pain and improve a person’s quality of life. This article will discuss nerve pain and its symptoms, how nutrients and supplements can help reduce it, and non-surgical treatments that can help restore the body from nerve pain. We work with certified medical providers who use our patients’ valuable information to provide non-surgical treatments for nerve pain combined with nutrients and supplements from reoccurring. We encourage patients to ask essential questions and seek education from our associated medical providers about their condition. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., provides this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

 

How Does Nerve Pain Occur In The Body?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you been experiencing pins and needles in your hands or feet or constant muscle twitches? Maybe you’re feeling pain in your upper or lower extremities. If you’ve had these sensations all over your body, it could be due to nerve pain affecting your musculoskeletal system. Research studies have shown nerve pain is often caused by a lesion or disease that is affecting the brain’s somatosensory system. This can cause an imbalance in neuron signaling and disrupt information traveling to the brain. The somatosensory system is responsible for our ability to feel, touch, and experience pressure and pain. When it’s affected by injuries or pathogens, information can be disrupted in the spinal cord and brain. Additional research studies revealed that nerve pain could be caused by compressed nerve roots, leading to ongoing or intermittent pain that may spread to different areas and cause structural changes involving peripheral and central sensitization. This can lead to associated symptoms that can disrupt normal body functions.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful look at how nutrients and supplements are combined with decompression for nerve repair. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

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Anti-Inflammatory Nutritional Strategies Using MET | Call: 915-850-0900

Anti-Inflammatory Nutritional Strategies Using MET | Call: 915-850-0900 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Introduction

The immune system is crucial in protecting the body from foreign pathogens that cause inflammation in the affected area. Cytokines produce inflammation in the body to fight off infections or bacteria. However, inflammation can be beneficial or harmful, depending on the severity of the affected area. Acute inflammation is a natural healing process that causes redness, swelling, and heat in the affected area, and it usually resolves within a few days. In contrast, chronic inflammation causes pain and damages healthy tissues, mistaking them for foreign invaders. Environmental factors can trigger chronic inflammation, leading to muscle and joint pain and other chronic conditions. Fortunately, an anti-inflammatory diet combined with soft tissue therapy can help reduce the effects of chronic inflammation. Our article today discusses how these diets work and how they can be combined with MET therapy to restore the body. We utilize and incorporate valuable information about our patients to certified medical providers using MET therapy to relieve chronic inflammation associated with the musculoskeletal system through dieting. We encourage and refer patients to associated medical providers based on their findings while supporting that education is a remarkable and fantastic way to ask our providers the essential questions at the patient’s acknowledgment. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., comprises this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

 

What Are Anti-Inflammatory Diets?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you experiencing inflammation in your muscles, joints, or vital organs? Do you feel musculoskeletal pain or have uncertain symptoms after eating certain foods? Chronic stress, obesity, autoimmune disorders, and abdominal pain can cause chronic inflammation. These conditions may be caused by environmental factors leading to chronic inflammation. Research shows that certain dietary components can contribute to inflammation, which can be beneficial and harmful. While additional research studies reveal that incorporating lean meats, omega-3s, antioxidants, fruits, and vegetables can help minimize inflammasome activation and its negative effects on the muscles, joints, and vital organs to reduce chronic inflammation.

 

How Anti-Inflammatory Diets Help The Body?

Did you know that adopting an anti-inflammatory diet can help reduce the effects of chronic inflammation in the body? Research studies reveal that lowering the intake of pro-inflammatory foods and increasing the consumption of unsaturated fats, fruits, and vegetables can effectively combat inflammation. While inflammation is a natural defense mechanism, excessive production of inflammatory cytokines can lead to chronic conditions. However, combining an anti-inflammatory diet with exercise or physical therapy can help reduce these cytokines and identify the underlying causes of inflammation. By consuming specific foods and vitamins, an individual can effectively reduce the progression of inflammation and prevent further damage to the body.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an overview of how anti-inflammatory nutritional strategies are used in MET therapy. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

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Staying Hydrated Can Help Relieve Back Pain: EP Chiropractic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Staying Hydrated Can Help Relieve Back Pain: EP Chiropractic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Individuals may not be aware that back discomfort/pain symptoms can be connected to not staying hydrated. When the body is dehydrated, it reduces the amount of fluid in the spinal discs making them smaller, resulting in decreased cushioning and support for the spine. The stress can lead to swelling, causing further back discomfort, even a herniated disc. Individuals that experience frequent back pain could find relief by increasing their H2O consumption.

Staying Hydrated

Physical activity and healthy nutrition are important for healthy living. However, individuals can forget the basic need for water, often resulting in dehydration. The body needs to maintain hydration levels to function correctly. Dehydration can cause the body's fascia/connective tissue which supports every cell and organ, to lose lubrication that allows the muscles to move, slide, and glide smoothly, causing stiffness, and tangled knots/trigger points, making movement difficult and painful.

The Body's Overall Health

  • The body is 60% water.
  • Hydration replaces body fluids lost through exhaling, sweating, and waste elimination.
  • The body loses and needs to replace around 2-3 quarts of water daily.
  • Proper hydration regulates temperature, keeps the joints functioning smoothly, protects the spine, and facilitates waste removal.

Dehydration

Even being a little dehydrated is not healthy. Studies have shown that losing 1-2% of body weight without replacing fluids causes thinking and memory problems. A 4% deficit causes headaches, irritability, and sleepiness. Physical work or working outdoors without proper hydration impairs muscle endurance and strength. Dehydration stresses the spine even more which can cause painful swelling and bulged discs. Chronic pain conditions can be worsened by dehydration. This includes:

 

  • Overall stiffness
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Joint pain
  • Arthritis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • All can be affected by dehydration.

 

Lack of water levels can lead to back pain because the discs between the vertebrae need fluid to cushion the bones. They begin to dry out when not properly hydrated, exacerbating back discomfort symptoms that could lead to similar symptoms in the neck or legs.

 

  • The spinal discs are filled with a gel substance of around 75% water.
  • The inner and outer rings/nucleus pulposus are made almost entirely of water.
  • Water is slowly released from the spinal discs throughout the day.
  • The discs absorb most of the shock from everyday movements while protecting the spinal cord.
  • The discs rehydrate during sleep.

Indicators of Dehydration

Other than back pain and discomfort, other symptoms of dehydration.

 

  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Headaches
  • Dark Urine
  • Dry Skin
  • Dry Eyes
  • Blurry Vision
  • Bad Breath
  • Dizziness
  • Fever

 

Caffeinated beverages - soft drinks, tea, and coffee count partly toward daily fluid intake. They do not dehydrate the body, but they can increase urination and are recommended not to be the primary source of liquids during the day.

Hydration

Throughout the day, drink plenty of water and move around and stretch to circulate the H2O.

Increase Water Intake

  • Sixty-four ounces, eight glasses per day, is the common recommendation.
  • Water intake encompasses all the liquids consumed in a day, including coffee, tea, and soup.
  • Foods like cantaloupe and watermelon count toward daily water consumption.
  • The best sources are water and drinks, primarily water sport replacement drinks, herbal teas, lemon water, and vegetable broth.
  • Drink more when working out and being active. More water is needed on top of the 64 ounces when active.
  • Keep hydrating long after the physical activity or workout is over.
  • Check out hydration-tracking apps.

Drink Before Becoming Thirsty

  • When the brain signals thirst, the body is already dehydrated.
  • Stay ahead by sipping water throughout the day.
  • Keep a water bottle close by at school or work, refill it twice daily, and increase refills on hot days.

Monitor Hydration Levels

  • An easy way to assess dehydration is by looking at urine color.
  • Light yellow or clear is healthy.
  • Dark yellow or cloudy indicates dehydration. 

 

The Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Team can realign the spine and body to optimal function and assist in developing a nutrition plan to maintain health and wellness.

Benefits Of Healthy Eating and Chiropractic Care

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

El-Sharkawy, Ahmed M et al. “Acute and chronic effects of hydration status on health.” Nutrition Reviews vol. 73 Suppl 2 (2015): 97-109. doi:10.1093/nutrit/nuv038

 

Johannaber, Kenneth, and Fadi A Fathallah. “Spinal disc hydration status during the simulated stooped posture.” Work (Reading, Mass.) vol. 41 Suppl 1 (2012): 2384-6. doi:10.3233/WOR-2012-0470-2384

 

Manz, Friedrich, and Andreas Wentz. “The importance of good hydration for the prevention of chronic diseases.” Nutrition Reviews vol. 63,6 Pt 2 (2005): S2-5. doi:10.1111/j.1753-4887.2005.tb00150.x

 

Ritz, Patrick, and Gilles Berrut. “The importance of good hydration for day-to-day health.” Nutrition Reviews vol. 63,6 Pt 2 (2005): S6-13. doi:10.1111/j.1753-4887.2005.tb00155.x

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Back discomfort/pain symptoms can be connected to not staying hydrated. Increasing H2O consumption can help bring relief. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Digestive Enzymes: EP Wellness Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Digestive Enzymes: EP Wellness Functional Medicine Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

The body makes digestive enzymes to help break down food carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Healthy digestion and nutrient absorption depend on these enzymes, a protein that speeds up chemical reactions in the mouth, pancreas, and intestines. Certain health conditions like pancreatic insufficiency and lactose intolerance can cause low enzyme levels and insufficiency and may need replacement digestive enzymes to help prevent malabsorption. That's where digestive enzyme supplements come in.

Digestive Enzymes

Digestive enzymes are a vital part of digestion; without them, the body can't break foods down, and nutrients can't be fully absorbed. A lack of digestive enzymes can lead to gastrointestinal/GI symptoms and cause malnourishment, even with a nutritious diet. The result is unpleasant digestive symptoms that can include:

 

  • Poor absorption of nutrients
  • Bloating
  • Stomach pain
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

 

Digestive enzyme supplements have been used for treating common forms of gut irritation, heartburn, and other ailments.

Enzyme Types

The main digestive enzymes made in the pancreas include:

Amylase

  • It is also made in the mouth.
  • Breaks down carbohydrates, or starches, into sugar molecules.
  • Low amylase can lead to diarrhea.

Lipase

  • This works with liver bile to break down fats.
  • Lipase insufficiency causes decreased levels of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K.

Protease

  • This enzyme breaks down proteins into amino acids.
  • It also helps keep bacteria, yeast, and protozoa out of the intestines.
  • A shortage of protease can lead to allergies or toxicity in the intestines.

Enzymes made in the small intestine include:

Lactase

  • Breaks down lactose, a sugar found in dairy products.

Sucrase

  • Breaks down sucrose, a sugar found in fruits and vegetables.

Insufficiency

When the body does not produce enough digestive enzymes or doesn't release them correctly. A few types include:

Lactose Intolerance

  • The body does not produce enough lactase, making digesting the natural sugar in milk and dairy products difficult.

Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency

  • EPI is when the pancreas does not produce enough of the enzymes necessary to digest carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency

  • The body does not have enough sucrase to digest certain sugars.

Symptoms

Common digestive enzyme insufficiency symptoms:

 

 

Talking to a doctor if symptoms persist is recommended, as these could be signs of gut irritation or indicate a more serious condition.

Supplements

Prescription Enzymes

Individuals diagnosed with enzyme insufficiency may need to take prescription digestive enzymes, depending on the severity. These supplements assist in food breakdown and nutrient absorption. The most common enzyme replacement therapy is pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy or PERT. PERT is a prescribed medication that includes amylase, lipase, and protease. Individuals with cystic fibrosis often have pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, as the body can’t release the enzymes properly. And individuals with pancreatitis require PERT because their pancreas develops mucus and scar tissue over time.

Over-The-Counter Enzymes

Over-the-counter digestive enzyme supplements can contain amylase, lipase, and protease and can help with acid reflux, gas, bloating, and diarrhea. Some contain lactase and alpha-galactosidase. Alpha-galactosidase can help break down a non-absorbable fiber called galactooligosaccharides /GOS, mostly found in beans, root vegetables, and certain dairy products.

Certain foods contain digestive enzymes, including:

 

  • Honey
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Pineapples
  • Mangos
  • Papayas
  • Ginger
  • Sauerkraut
  • Kiwi
  • Kefir

 

Supplementing the diet with some of these foods can help with digestion.

Functional Nutrition

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Beliveau, Peter J H, et al. “An Investigation of Chiropractor-Directed Weight-Loss Interventions: Secondary Analysis of O-COAST.” Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics vol. 42,5 (2019): 353-365. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2018.11.015

 

Brennan, Gregory T, and Muhammad Wasif Saif. “Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy: A Concise Review.” JOP: Journal of the pancreas vol. 20,5 (2019): 121-125.

 

Corring, T. “The adaptation of digestive enzymes to the diet: its physiological significance.” Reproduction, nutrition, developpement vol. 20,4B (1980): 1217-35. doi:10.1051/rnd:19800713

 

Goodman, Barbara E. “Insights into digestion and absorption of major nutrients in humans.” Advances in physiology education vol. 34,2 (2010): 44-53. doi:10.1152/advan.00094.2009

 

Vogt, Günter. “Synthesis of digestive enzymes, food processing, and nutrient absorption in decapod crustaceans: a comparison to the mammalian model of digestion.” Zoology (Jena, Germany) vol. 147 (2021): 125945. doi:10.1016/j.zool.2021.125945

 

Whitcomb, David C, and Mark E Lowe. “Human pancreatic digestive enzymes.” Digestive diseases and sciences vol. 52,1 (2007): 1-17. doi:10.1007/s10620-006-9589-z

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Health conditions like lactose intolerance can cause low enzyme levels and may need replacement digestive enzymes. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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The Best Diet For Hypertension (Part 1) | Call: 915-850-0900

The Best Diet For Hypertension (Part 1) | Call: 915-850-0900 | Diet and Supplements | Scoop.it

Introduction

Dr. Jimenez, D.C., presents how to find the best diet approach to hypertension and cardiometabolic risk factors in this 2-part series. Many factors often play a role in our health and wellness. In today’s presentation, we will look at how a cardiometabolic diet is personalized for every body type and how genes play with the cardiometabolic diet. Part 2 will continue with how genes play their role in a cardiometabolic diet. We mention our patients to certified medical providers that provide available therapy treatments for individuals suffering from chronic conditions associated with metabolic connections. We encourage each patient when it is appropriate by referring them to associated medical providers based on their diagnosis or needs. We understand and accept that education is a marvelous way when asking our providers’ crucial questions at the patient’s request and acknowledgment. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., uses this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

 

What Is A Cardiometabolic Diet?

Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., presents: Regarding cardiovascular disorders, some terms we look for are: actual heart disease or stroke risk, or they’re on the metabolic side. Insulin, blood sugar, metabolic dysfunction. These words capture the themes we’ve been talking about lipids, glucose, inflammation, and insulin. Those are the people that you’re thinking about for this plan. And what you’re doing is building a lifestyle prescription. And for our patients who have cardiometabolic issues, we’re going to really take advantage of those features of our cardiometabolic food plan and then take them a step further to not only give a low glycemic impact, anti-inflammatory, plant-based kind of nutrient source but then how can we tailor it according to other parameters of this patient and then how can we help this patient implement it when they step outside your office and have to enter into their environment, which may or may not be set up for success.

 

So first things first. There is a practitioner guide that you must take advantage of, and this is like the scriptures of nutrition, and it has so many resources in here, but of course, they are of use to you once you know about them. So this is going to give you the how-to. So in case you miss something or want more detail, please refer to this practitioner guide for the cardiometabolic food plan. Now, let’s say you want to do the first entry-level use of this food plan. Well, we would grab the one that tells a cardiometabolic food plan. You’ll notice that all these specialized foods are selected to help with cardiometabolic conditions.

 

Personalizing A Plan

Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., presents: And it’s much better than saying, “Hey, eat fewer carbs, eat more plants. You know, eat healthier and exercise more.” That needs to be more specific. So taking it a step further, give them a blank food plan. It doesn’t have to be personalized to another level. Handing them a food plan and telling them to start eating from this list is only sometimes going to work. Sometimes we have to take it a step further to give them food choices in terms of quality and quantity. To that point, you have the ability right now with your patient to guesstimate size and caloric targets.

 

We can estimate size and weight and put small, medium, and large portions on food consumption. An example will be if we look at the different sizes of body types. For a petite adult body, it is best to ensure they consume about 1200-1400 calories. A medium adult body must consume about 1400-1800 calories, and a large adult body must consume about 1800-2200 calories. That might be the first kind of personalization.

 

Let’s give you some caloric-guided, quantity-guided food plan options. So what’s beautiful is that we have those already built out, and if you look closely at them, it tells you how many servings of each category should be in each specific small, medium, and large food plan. So you don’t have to do that calculation. Now if you want to take it to the next level and you have a BIA or a bioimpedance analysis machine, you can understand specifically their caloric burn rate and then if you want to modify it. An example would be a 40-year-old male who is unhappy with his weight and has been dealing with issues causing him ankle pain. So let’s see how we can change these things.

 

As we look at his body index, he is about 245 pounds and has been dealing with some cardiometabolic issues. Now when we look at his numbers and data from the BIA machine, we would develop a food plan that can help dampen the cardiometabolic issues effects that can help him. We would start to calculate come caloric recommendations and have a personalized diet and exercise plan to reduce the symptoms affecting his body and help promote muscle gain and weight loss. This customized plan allows him to keep track of his progress to see what works that is helping him lose weight or what needs improvement. Making these small changes can be beneficial in the long hall, as it will take some time to develop healthy habits.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful overview on the best diet for hypertension in the body in this 2-part series. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.