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Influence organisationnelle sur la gestion de projet (infographie)

Influence organisationnelle sur la gestion de projet (infographie) | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Infographie sur l'influence des organisations sur la gestion de projet
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Cet article fait suite à un premier paru il y a quelques mois. Vous retrouverez le tableau dans l’article organizational structure

Je reprends la matrice des structures organisationnelles et de leurs influences sur la gestion de projet dans une infographie.

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Devops et agilité
DEVOPS, agilité, tests, déploiement, sécurité
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Upstream Kanban - Business Agility with Kanban

Upstream Kanban - Business Agility with Kanban | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
You have probably heard the concept of Upstream Kanban and wonder what it is. Or some Kanban specialist told you that the solution to your problems is to implement an Upstream Kanban System. Well, in this article we explain what it is, how it can help you and how to implement it. Introduction to Upstream Kanban Upstream Kanban is how Kanban practitioners refer to the part of the value stream that corresponds to the development of options, order management or product discovery. In other words, everything that must be done before you actually start developing software or responding to an
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Traduction de « Stop starting, start finishing », Lean-Kanban University | Club Agile Normandie

Traduction de « Stop starting, start finishing », Lean-Kanban University | Club Agile Normandie | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it


Un énorme MERCI à Loïc Rabault qui a traduit (avec l’accord des auteurs) le petit livre sympa sur le Lean KANBAN ! Voici les fruits de son travail :

COMMENT DEVENIR UN HEROS DE LA PLANIFICATION DE PROJET EN SUIVANT LES PAS DE JUSTIN… « Stop starting, start finishing », Lean-Kanban University

Justin est un chef de projet qui a sauvé un projet tout entier en faisant des choses très simples… voyons ensemble ce qui s’est passé
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How to Implement Hypothesis-Driven Development | ThoughtWorks | ThoughtWorks

How to Implement Hypothesis-Driven Development | ThoughtWorks | ThoughtWorks | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it

The steps of the scientific method are to:

Make observations
Formulate a hypothesis
Design an experiment to test the hypothesis
State the indicators to evaluate if the experiment has succeeded
Conduct the experiment
Evaluate the results of the experiment
Accept or reject the hypothesis
If necessary, make and test a new hypothesis


Using an experimentation approach to software development


We need to challenge the concept of having fixed requirements for a product or service. Requirements are valuable when teams execute a well known or understood phase of an initiative, and can leverage well understood practices to achieve the outcome. However, when you are in an exploratory, complex and uncertain phase you need hypotheses.
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Hypothesis-driven development: Get started with Enterprise Design Thinking - IBM Garage Practices

Hypothesis-driven development: Get started with Enterprise Design Thinking - IBM Garage Practices | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Continuous delivery demands the use of hypotheses, not requirements, to deliver what customers want. Developers embrace continuous experimentation and adaption.
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Kanban Practices - The six core Kanban practices

Kanban Practices - The six core Kanban practices | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
In this article we explain in detail the six practices of Kanban. The Kanban Practices The Kanban method is based on six basic practices to create an emerging set of positive behaviors in organizations and achieve better agility in the provision of services. These practices should be applied, reviewed and improved relentlessly: Visualize Limit work in progress Manage flow Make policies explicit Implement feedback loops Improve collaboratively, evolve experimentally Kanban, as a method designed for the evolutionary and continuous improvement of organizations and work processes, is greatly influenced by systems theory. Therefore, it seeks to generate emerging behaviors from the
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Tempo du coach agile

Le coaching Agile m'a toujours fait penser à la musique, rythme, émotion, tension et résolutions... d'où ce titre "tempo" et ces deux questions : - Quel est le…
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Clean Coders Hate What Happens To Your Code When You Use These Enterp…

Presented at ACCU (24th April 2015) It is all to easy to dismiss problematic codebases on some nebulous idea of bad practice or bad programmers. Poor code, how…
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Lean Coffee in 5 Minutes

Lean Coffee in 5 Minutes | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Lean Coffee is easy to learn, empowers participants and increases engagement. It is also fun! Give it a try, learn in this video how shockingly simple. Get your own personal copy of the Lean Coffee Poster used in this video and use it as your facilitation guide for your next meeting.
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The 4 Soils - Sprint Retrospective

The 4 Soils - Sprint Retrospective | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
In every Sprint, Sprint Retrospective is an excellent chance to inspect and adapt the way of working.
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3 Steps to Becoming an Agile Coach

3 Steps to Becoming an Agile Coach | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Completing an Agile Coaching certification doesn’t make you an Agile Coach. So where do you start and how do you chart your own journey?
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Remote Agile (Part 2): Virtual Liberating Structures

Remote Agile (Part 2): Virtual Liberating Structures | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
This follow-up post now delves into virtual Liberating Structures, answering the question of how we can make use of the powerful toolbox of inclusive and collaborative practices in a remote setting.
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Être Agile : avoir un DoD qui se focalise sur les problèmes à résoudre | by Jean-Pierre Lambert | Jean-Pierre Lambert's blog

Être Agile : avoir un DoD qui se focalise sur les problèmes à résoudre | by Jean-Pierre Lambert | Jean-Pierre Lambert's blog | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Les équipes web du Player ont récemment repris leur Definition of Done ou DoD. C’est super d’abord parce que cela dénote une appropriation de la part de l’équipe : je ne les ai pas encouragés à…
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Real Options Agile Tour Brussels 2013

Stories about how we used Real Options, Set-Based Design, the Creative Process to make surprisingly good decisions in bad circumstances
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Resources

Resources | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
The ComPanion What began as a review of the workbook – for the ’16 training – transitioned into a new – and extra – guide intended to illuminate the deeper […]
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Community Resources

 

Video Resources

Video links to some of the models and methodologies used within Art of Hosting .

Art of Hosting – introduction: https://vimeo.com/72614471

Four-fold Practice – the core practice of Art of Hosting: https://vimeo.com/69785461

Harvesting – as the sister of Hosting conversations: https://vimeo.com/69785465

Collective Story Harvest: https://vimeo.com/69798732

Chaordic Path: https://vimeo.com/69785462

Chaordic Stepping Stones: https://vimeo.com/69798731

Circle Process: https://vimeo.com/69785464

Open Space Technology: https://vimeo.com/69798729

Pro-Action Cafe: https://vimeo.com/69798730

World Café: https://vimeo.com/69798733

Two Loops of System Change: http://vimeo.com/17907928

Community Conversations for the common good: https://vimeo.com/40679035

 

Downloads

Compiled by our friends and harvesters of the Art of Participatory Leadership Training in Slovenia, 2014.

The Art of Harvesting.pdf – Download File

 

The Art of Powerful Questions.pdf – Download File

 

Collective Harvesting of AoH Practice Stories.pdf – Download File

 

Description of Designing Wiser Action.pdf – Download File

 

DFWA Harvest Template.jpg – Download File

 

From Hero to Host.pdf – Download File

 

Conversational Leadership.pdf – Download File

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An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of project tasks

An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of project tasks | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Introduction In an essay on the uncertainty of project task estimates,  I  described how a task estimate corresponds to a  probability distribution.  Put simply, a task estimate is actually a range of possible completion times, each with a probability of occurrence specified by a distribution.   If one knows the distribution,  it is possible to answer questions  such as:  "What is…
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The Top 10 Benefits of Kanban | Nave

The Top 10 Benefits of Kanban | Nave | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Kanban can help you run your business better, make your processes more efficient and empower your team to accomplish more, faster. Learn 10 ways Kanban benefits your business!
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Traditional management methods rely on planning upfront and pushing the work on to your team. This results in teams struggling with more work than they have the bandwidth for. Kanban suggests the implementation of a pull system – the team pulls tasks into the workflow only when they have the capacity to do so.

One of the core Kanban practices is imposing work in progress limits on each process state. When the WIP limit is reached, no new tasks are allowed to enter that state until another task has left. WIP limits prevent teams from working on too many tasks at the same time.

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Domptez vos refactoring avec la Mikado Method

Domptez vos refactoring avec la Mikado Method | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it


D’après une étude du « The Crash Report 2011 – 2012« , le coût de la dette technique est estimé à 3,6 millions de dollars pour une unique application de taille moyenne. Réduire cette dette est une nécessité pour pouvoir maintenir et faire évoluer un système d’information. Les développeurs doivent souvent travailler sur un code non testé, difficile à comprendre et à modifier, c’est ce qu’on appelle un « code legacy ».

Faire évoluer un code legacy est souvent considéré comme un art. L’artisan doit maîtriser des techniques et des outils mais aussi bien s’organiser pour ne pas se décourager face à la complexité de la tâche.

Une pratique importante qui est souvent négligée ; le refactoring du code legacy. Sans cette pratique nécessaire, la dette technique s’accumule et le coût des prochaines évolutions et modifications de notre code augmente. Un bon refactoring se fait en petites étapes (des baby steps).
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Your Impact Outweighs Your Intention

Your Impact Outweighs Your Intention | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
When I first became a Scrum Master, I heard the phrase assume positive intent over and over again. And it really resonated with me. It made sense. I started to notice how quick I was to jump to conclusions about other people’s intentions. When I check myself on the assumptions I am making about other people’s intentions, I am more effective at navigating situations in a positive and productive way. And my stress goes down.

However, in the past few years, I’ve noticed the phrase assume positive intent sometimes being used in a way that doesn’t feel good. I’ve seen it used in a way that limits inclusivity and shuts down productive conflict.

I still assume positive intent. This concept helps me be a better coach, a better trainer, a better colleague, a better friend. I even talk about assuming positive intent in my blogs and in the online course Scrum Master: Grow. I just knew there was something more to it.

And then I had the a-ha moment.
Mickael Ruaus insight:

 

“Your impact outweighs your intention.”

This statement was made at one of my Co-Active Leadership Retreats. And suddenly it all made sense.

While it is incredibly helpful to assume positive intent when we engage with others, that does not mean we give people a free pass. It does not automatically make their words and behaviors okay.

Because leadership is about owning your impact.

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The original Lean "versus" Agile for knowledge work - or is it "and"?

The original Lean "versus" Agile for knowledge work - or is it "and"? | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
"When will it be done?" is a damaging question when dealing with complexity & uncertainty. Leadership needs to be about blaming those who fail to help or who fail to ask for help, over blaming those who fail. According to Richard Hackman's research, over 80% of a team's performance is determined by structure, with <10% from coaching after team setup. Indeed, the counter-measures to the 5 dysfunctions of a team are remarkably similar to the Scrum values. Daily Huddles and War Rooms tend to get facilitated by senior leaders. Lean & Agile can provide alignment , and the level autonomy depends on the level of servant leadership. Taken to the extreme, command & control with blame game is a good strategy to bring about the 5 dysfunctions of a team. I put it to you that the ideal for dealing with complexity 21st century is aligned autonomy, self-managing teams, and Team of Teams.
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Building Resilient Teams

Building Resilient Teams | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
Research suggests that reaching true mastery of a field requires 10,000 hours of deliberate practice. What exactly is needed to grow passion and perseverance to endure such an effort?
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Development Team Anti-Patterns

Development Team Anti-Patterns | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
After covering the Scrum Master and the Product Owner, this article addresses Development Team anti-patterns, covering all Scrum Events as well as the Product Backlog artifact. Learn more about what to look out for if you want to support your fellow teammates.
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Causes for Zombified Interaction between Scrum Teams and Stakeholders

Causes for Zombified Interaction between Scrum Teams and Stakeholders | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it
The article explores the primary causes of zombified interaction between Scrum Teams and stakeholders.
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Agile Forecasting Techniques for the Next Decade

Agile Forecasting Techniques for the Next Decade | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it

SLE – The forecast at the Day and Iteration layers

To talk about forecasting at the Day and Iteration layers, I use the Service Level Expectation (SLE) as defined in the Kanban Guide for Scrum Teams.

A service level expectation (SLE) forecasts how long it should take a given item to flow from start to finish within the Scrum Team’s workflow

For example, let’s say that historically, your development team completes 85 % of its PBIs in 8 days or less. This is our forecast for an item. It has a calculated date range, 8 days or less, and a probability, 85 %.

As a PBI is moving through the Scrum Team’s workflow, I use its current age in the workflow and compare it with its corresponding SLE to make sure it will meet its forecast.

At our daily Scrum, we can use this forecast to keep track of our current work. If my PBI has been in the workflow for 3 days, I might not pay as much attention to it compared to another PBI who is now to its 7th day in the workflow.

Instead of using tasks with estimated hours on it to track its remaining work, we use the combination PBI age + SLE to monitor if we will meet our forecast. I believe these are two data points of value to track work. I also think they are more valuable than estimated hours. I am using hard data (age and SLE) to track work.

I believe this fixes both problems named above. My team doesn’t spend any time estimating each task. It can still decompose the PBIs if required. But we compare the age of the PBI with the SLE of the team. My team uses a probability in its forecasting, thus leaving the door to some uncertainty that can prevent it from meeting the SLE.
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Throughput and Monte Carlo – The forecast at the Release and Product level

As we go higher in the layers of the onion, we move the conversation from one PBI to multiple PBIs. At the Release and Product layers of the onion, the Product Owner is now talking in terms of multiple PBIs.  For example, a Product Owner might have 54 PBIs left to launch a release. Or she might have a deadline to reach and wonders how many PBIs can be completed on that date. In both situations, forecasting the future can help her narrow her decsion-making process. And as we’ve seen above, forecasting the future requires a calculated value with a probability.

My experience has been that Monte Carlo simulations, using throughput as its input, can generate a forecast for those layers of the onion. Basically, the Monte Carlo simulations will use your historical throughput and simulate the future a large number of times (i.e. 10,000 times).

Let’s take the example above and see how the results of the Monte Carlo simulations can help the Product Owner. I had previously mentioned above the Product Owner has 54 remaining PBIs to complete her release. Running the Monte Carlo simulations with her historical throughput, she gets the following results:

Her first forecast, 25 days with 90% confidence, says there’s a 90% chance her team can deliver the remaining 54 PBIs of the release in the next 25 days. At the far right, there’s a 30 % chance they will deliver them in 16 days. She can now turn back to the business to discuss if 25 days is an acceptable number. If they prefer to have it in 14 days, she can reply the outlook for this scenario has less than 30 % of happening.

For a more detailed read on Monte Carlo simulations and a tool to help you do them quickly, I recommend the post Create Faster and More Accurate Forecasts using Probabilities from my fellow PST Julia Webster.

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Slow Conversations For An Ever Faster Moving World

Slow Conversations For An Ever Faster Moving World | Devops et agilité | Scoop.it


A slow conversation follows these principles:

Making an invitation which allows conversation partners to truly engage openly
Accepting an invitation which allows conversation partners to truly engage openly
Taking the stance when listening of wanting to really understand
Understanding that when talking means truly being heard
Knowing that the conversation will remain confidential
Having no time pressure
Mickael Ruaus insight:

What makes a slow conversation different from a coaching conversation?

When you look at the principles above you might think these are simply guidelines for a good coaching conversation. The difference with the slow conversation is that both participants are there for each other, and the coaching or mentoring role can be exchanged throughout the conversation.

Coaching: the coach remains in an inquisitive, questioning stance with a complete focus on the coachee’s world. The coach offers no solutions, only questions to support the coachee in their thinking.

Mentoring: the mentor starts in a coaching stance and may then share their own experiences as impulses for the mentee.

Important: the mentor returns to a coaching stance after sharing their own experience. By asking whether their input has been useful ensures the coachee takes on the responsibility again for their own next steps.

This will need time at first to work well, however with practice will benefit the relationship in the long term as well as develop conversation skills for the future.

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