Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio
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In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers

In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
In western Myanmar a Chinese-backed energy and trading hub is taking shape on a remote island.

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, energy.

Danielle Lip's insight:

While reading this article I found it quite shocking to see that Myanmar is scrambling for energy, such as selling oil, this money is used in lanterns as a cheaper alternative to kerosene. People will do anything just to receive money and use it to help out their families. Money is not something easily  accessible and neither is energy.Yet, even though Myanmar is struggling right now, places such as Beijing still see Myanmar and Ramree Island as the main way to have safe and fast trade. 

The article also states that there are promising signs to China, and Southeast Asia to come back into the picture such as they are likely to have development that will focus on manufacturing in textiles and construction materials to help the country to gain power and energy back. 

The photographs in this article give for a good example of how China is striving for energy such as the women holding up the teapot that is considered to be a lamp with the use of oil. People in China are working hard and using different resources to serve as energy. Shouldn't people even out of China use up what they have and not be wasteful? 

Places in Southeast Asia can think of ways to gain energy, power and comfort because their whole motto on life is different than that of the United States of America.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, 17 December 2014, 22:29

With China making use of all its natural resources, I question how long will they last before running out of their resources and having to rely on other countries to supply them with something as basic as energy. Though I am overjoyed at the recent decline in gas prices, I am also concerned at what price countries such as China are selling their natural resources. Often times, it is the people living in villages that tend to pay for these consequences. It is from them that these resources are being extracted from and being massed produce to meet the needs of other countries. Before committing to projects that will meet the needs of other countries, they need to start making their people their number one priority.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, 2 December 2015, 02:05

this is where china grows at the expense of others. How are these people going to fight back? China is forced to do this because it wants to be the strongest nation in the world and as long as they are importing oil it relies on someone that can cut them off. And as long as they now are allowing the birth of two children the population growth in china is forcing china to expand and will do whatever means necessary to do so.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, 19 December 2015, 09:28

An interesting article that highlights important geographic disparities. The problem for Burma is that it has lagged behind in the world from its isolation. As a result when globalization such as the proposed trade zone in the article come about there is disastrous consequences. Unlike the west they are catching up and didn't have an adjusting period. Furthermore in China's race to keep its economy superior and out due America they have been going on wild spending sprees such as this deal to give them a global edge. Unfortunately this will leave many of the poor in Burma worse off than before. Plus their government will not likely help them because of their oppressive nature. Maybe all of this will create of revolution to give the Burmese freedom so that they can make these decisions for themselves as they enter the global community(also so they are not exploited as companies everywhere will likely be looking at its cheap labor and resources).

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BBC Bitesize - KS1 Geography - The Sing Sing festival in Papua New Guinea

BBC Bitesize - KS1 Geography - The Sing Sing festival in Papua New Guinea | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
A report about the Sing Sing festival in Papua New Guinea.
Danielle Lip's insight:

If you think about everyone has their own traditions and understanding of life and what happens in life, I can see from the festival for the Sing Sing in Papua New Guinea where the paint their faces yellow, white and red to represent birds, trees or mountain spirits. Life around the world is different from the way the world is here in the United States, where we have to take care of different disasters and shelter ourselves while the people in Papua new Guinea have to deal with things such as volcanoes and possibly hurricanes. 

This report was quite interesting and gave me the chance to see how this represents more than just painting a face but for being thankful for different things such as the birds, trees and mountains. 

Learning about other cultures and people really opens your eyes to what is going on around us, knowing that someone might have it just little bit tougher than we ourselves do.

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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth.

Danielle Lip's insight:

While watching this video you can learn a lot about a hotspot in just 2 minutes, understanding that a hotspot is an area in the upper mantle in which heat rises and slowly begins to expand, building up pressure. The magma, which is hot rises and the cold matter sinks. the magma rises through the cracks and the plates actually carry the volcano. How did the whole idea of a volcano occur? Who knows where these volcanos are?  The hotspot can cause volcanos to erupt or even cause the volcanos to spread out, who knew a hotspot could be such a huge influence on the world, causing massive landforms and causing much tragedy.

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, 23 March 2015, 22:49

The first video dumbs it down nicely for people like me. The tectonic plate moves roughly three inches a year, as the plate moves the magma stream stays in the same place, providing the foundation for the first island. The weight of the island actually deforms the plate and  the magma is temporarily stifled. Once the plate moves away from the weight of the island a new hotspot is formed and a new island forms in the same way, thus making the Hawaiian islands a string of islands. 

The second video details how Oahu lost 20 trillion pounds of rock eons ago and this is why the island has such a unique shape. It lost an estimated twenty miles of island into the ocean. Fascinating stuff for a neophyte like me!

Louis Mazza's curator insight, 6 May 2015, 15:33

What is a hotspot? It is a source of localized energy from the seafloor that creates volcanoes. It is not just a shallow reservoir nor a pipe filled with liquid. It is a constant stream of magma that does not move. Simple the plate move over it creating a row of multiple volcanoes, such as the Hawaiian Islands. When the magma erupts thru the surface the magma then turns to lava, and dries to rock. This process repeats until the built up lava is a volcano, still with hotspot in the middle. The plate moves and the hotspot creates a new volcano.

                This is interesting because hotspots are always changing geography, and causing map makers and teachers everywhere to learn new islands. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, 14 December 2015, 17:18

this is a good way to discover how volcanoes are formed, and if you are trying to understand the Oceania region then this is information you need to know.

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Volcanic Landscape Change

Volcanic Landscape Change | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it

"Mount Tavurvur, on Papua New Guinea's New Britain Island, erupted on August 29, 2014, throwing ash (gray-brown areas of September image) over surrounding areas. Its last major eruption was in 1994. Tavurvur is a stratovolcano, a volcano consisting of alternating layers of lava and ash, and is located along the eastern edge of the Rabaul Volcanic Complex. Simpson Harbor forms part of the much larger (mostly submerged) Rabaul Caldera."

 

Tags: disasters, remote sensing, Oceania, Papua New Guinea, physical.

Danielle Lip's insight:

There may not be may words on this article but a picture can speak a thousands words as I've seen when looking at these pictures. The climate changing is not only affecting the way people live but it is also affecting the structure of the world's atmosphere such as the melting glacier in Peru called Qori Kalis. The ice and glacier has retreated so much that the ice has melted and created a small lake right in the middle where the huge glacier used to stand. What is going to happen to the work if these type of disasters keep occurring? What other types of physical changes will occur? Any type of change in the land can affect how people live, how they find shelter and any other aspect of living.  These type of physical changes are not only happening far from the United States but also in the United States such as California. It is important to look at these 302 photos because it really put life into perspective, showing how something can easily change over time.

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Making Waves, Boston Calling - BBC World Service

Making Waves, Boston Calling - BBC World Service | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
A US news agency finds fishermen held as slaves in Southeast Asia.
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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.

 

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, water, disasters, urban ecology, coastal, climate change. 

Danielle Lip's insight:

Flooding is a major risk when it comes to the world we live in especially for Southeast Asia, some areas will be below sea level which shows how the the climate changes are affecting the flood risks caused by global carbon emission. A study from this article shows that eight our of ten of the largest countries will be at the risk of being flooded and below sea level. The major question is how can this carbon emissions be lower? If the carbon is lower then the sea level will rise and less countries will be at risk, this is mainly focusing on Southeast Asia. Yes, we can not change the climate changes but by keeping the land clean and taking care of the environment the flood risk and sea level change could get out of risk level. 

If the weather continues at the rate it is at then about 2.6 percent of the global population which is approximately 177 million people will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding. Flooding can cause a lot of damage to homes, crops and people physically because flooding is not just a little amount of water.

The largest country at risk with people in danger from the map is China, I liked the way this map worked because you can see from the boxes how many people are going to be affected by the flooding. Instead of just having numbers, giving a better visual for people with the boxes and their sizes.

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Eben Lenderking's curator insight, 10 October 2014, 15:03

Fascinating study on the flood impact of climate change

Maria la del Varrio's curator insight, 15 December 2014, 22:14

In this article the author discusses the risk of flooding in many different locations of the world. He claims about 2.6 percent of the world's populations. That's a big percentage considering all the people of the planet. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, 21 April 2015, 02:24

It's like watching the land on Earth change right in front of our eyes.  According to this map, if global carbon emissions stay as they currently are and sea levels can be affected about as much as expected, 2.6 million people of the global population will live in a high risk flood zone; this wipes out 177 million people!  

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Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life

Most Tibetans Genetically Adapted To The High Life | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of Tibetans share a genetic mutation that prevents their blood from becoming dangerously clogged with red blood cells at high altitudes—a response that can be deadly for non-native mountaineers. Karen Hopkin reports.
Danielle Lip's insight:

The fact that the people in Tibet have become environmentally and culturally adapted to the land shows just how serious the whole mutation is. Many people who would travel to such high heights would not be able to respond in the same was as the Tibetans. This mutation prevents blood from becoming severely clogged and could injure those who are not mountaineers in the area. This mutation started about 8,000 years ago which is interesting because who was the first person to have this gene mutation and what caused the mutation? Tibetan people have a rare gene sequence that shows just how special they are to their land and I find it quite interesting because not everyone would be able to live with it? What would happen if the people of Tibet happen to move someone outside of Tibet, would their blood start to clog? 

90% of people in Tibet have this gene sequence and shows how the gene adaptation will change due to levels of height, having a play on words because the Tibetan people are always at very high levels. Thin air and clogged blood are not a good combination.

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, 15 April 2015, 14:45

This is extremely interesting.  When I think of the mutated gene that most Tibetans have I think of evolution happening right in front of our eyes.  Most lowland humans would not be able to survive at the Tibetan level of living, which goes to show you that over time the people who live in this area were naturally selected due to the special genes of their ancestors who survived while others without the gene died off.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, 7 December 2015, 18:01

The Tibetans are very amazing in the ways to adapting to high altitudes. Being 15,000 ft in elevation with 40% less oxygen than at sea level is very impressive. Many people like myself would find it difficult breathing in this conditions , but the Tibetans developed a mutation that lead them to not having their red blood cells clogged at this elevation. A perfect example of human adapting to their surrounding environment.

David Stiger's curator insight, 23 October 2018, 16:28
Humans often shape their environments, but, like all other animal species, the environment can fundamentally shape human beings at the molecular level. In order to not just merely survive, but to thrive, humans adapt to challenging environmental conditions. In Tibet, inhabitants live 15,000 feet above sea level. For non-natives, this sort of altitude could cause lethal blood clots. To overcome this challenge, the genes of average Tibetans have adapted overtime. Some 90 percent of the entire population possess a unique mutated gene that allows them to breathe without trouble and avoid red blood cell blockages. This trait goes back nearly 8,000 years, making Tibetans a very distinct population - akin to red haired men and women in Ireland. Not wanting to promote pseudo-science like eugenics, it is important to note that these people are not more or less human. But, because of their environment, they have surface level (physical and secondary) traits that help them cope with nature. Understanding this should impact the Han Chinese views of Tibet. At the molecular level, the Tibetans are a distinct and independent people who deserve the right to self-determination. Of course, China will never yield the resource-rich territory. 
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China paraxylene chemical plant hit by explosion

China paraxylene chemical plant hit by explosion | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
An explosion and blaze rip through a plant manufacturing the controversial chemical PX in Fujian province in eastern China.
Danielle Lip's insight:

When looking up news about China this news cast was posted within the last hour. It is crazy to think that this explosion is not deadly but can cause central nervous system damage as well as nausea and dizziness. The explosion has happened before and is said to have broken windows of neighboring houses. The plant that exploded helped to create  films  and from those produced the making of water bottles, other containers, fabrics including clothing and curtains, and x-ray and photographic film. The plant exploded in Zhangzhou and as of right now three are reported injured. Since there are factories and plants to help produce materials in China people who work in these factories or neighbor these factories are always at risk. Precautions should be in place so people are not injured in a explosion if something like this occurs again.The video and pictures on this website are quite interesting and I suggest looking at them to see how bad the fire really was. A explosion like this could happen anywhere that a chemical plant is located so everyone in the area should be aware of the effects that could arise.

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Japan's Disappearing Villages

Japan's Disappearing Villages | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
In the small town of Nagoro, population 35, one woman is trying to save her village from extinction by creating life-sized dolls for every inhabitant who either dies or moves away.
Danielle Lip's insight:

Considering the fact that only 35 people still live in this small town is extremely disturbing and upsetting. It is unreal to think that urban migration can cause some a village to almost completely disappear.The fertility rates went down and the life expectancy of individuals was becoming younger and younger due to more and more people dying, due to starvation and other forms of deaths. Through the Valley of Dolls you can see the imagination, creativity and memory that this one villager has because even though loved ones, family members and friends have passed she is still working hard to keep the town alive in a way that is sacred to her. 

When I first looked at the images I was little creeped out because of how life like the dolls are but if you look deeper you can almost see the real human in place of the doll. This women took the time and effect to bring the people in her village back to life and this is something that she should be acknowledged for, since in some one caption read " the lips are the hardest to make." Even though the lips are hard and time consuming she still makes them and wants her village to come back to life. Will this population die down now because the dolls are starting to take the place of the humans creating a new typer of population so the village will stay in place.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, 20 April 2015, 18:43

Due to urban migration, this village of Nagoro is said to be one of 10,000 small towns that will disappear in Japan.  I've been to some small towns in Japan and can say there is so much more culture in these villages than there is in the big cities.  I got a totally different feeling in my sole than when I ended my trip in Tokyo.  While both parts of the country have its pros and cons, it is terrible to think that these villages will be defeated to the rise of urbanism.   

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, 17 November 2015, 02:01

It has been estimated that in the coming years 80% of people will live within mega cities. This is that statistic unraveling before our eyes. It is really sad to me because these within these small villages is a culture that is almost like an art in its own right. It is clear to see the impacts it has on the remaining villagers.

 

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, 16 December 2015, 21:38

A depressing but also fascinating situation in Japan. Their Urban migration coupled by an aging population is wiping out their villages around the country. One women has even apparently been filling the village with dolls to make it seem more populated. How she got her neighbors to approve and where all the resources and money came from to pull that off who knows. However what is being witness now is a change in demographic but also one in geography since the village in 30 or so years could be reclaimed by the wilderness while the cities expand and have to cope with the influx taking away more wild land. Hopefully Japan gets this straightened out for they currently seem to be having the exact opposite demographic problem of China and India.

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India-Pakistan border Ceremony

Fascinating footage of a traditional ceremony that takes place on the Pakistan India border. From the BBC
Danielle Lip's insight:

 I was not expecting a border opening ceremony to occur in the ways that it did. There was cheering, applause  and clapping almost similar to a parade or athletic event where the community is coming together to celebrate. The cornets would play and the crowd excitement would just grow and grow. The flag of each country was raised, this ceremony had to happen precisely and without mistakes. Combined together each side of the border worked together, shook hands and the border was done and complete. 

Everything is not always simple but this border ceremony absolutely was for the Pakistan and Indian border. Why is this process so simple while the government and political issues are still deadly? 

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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, 30 March 2018, 22:51
This video shows a ceremony that takes place on the India-Pakistan border and how precisely things need to be done to keep the peace. The two flags are lowered at a slow pace to ensure they are being lowered at the same pace, for if one were to be lowered before the other it could cause an international dispute. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, 2 May 2018, 01:20
This is a really interesting display of hyper-nationalism and masculinity that has been taking place at the India-Pakistan border for years. On the surface, it seems like simply an entertaining, friendly competition. However, many are concerned that this tradition does nothing but enforce the tension between the two countries.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, 12 December 2018, 20:24
This event is interesting. Its almost reminds of me of two football teams staring each other down and chanting before a football game.  There is alot of tension between the two countries and some thing there is always a lingering possibility of war. This can seem to some as a way to be macho and "battle" without actually going to war. 
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This map shows where the real child vaccination problems are

This map shows where the real child vaccination problems are | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
India and Nigeria, not California.

 

Vaccinations and public health are in the news lately, mostly with a focus on the United States. But it's worth taking a look at this map Benjamin Hennig made of where children go unvaccinated on a global basis to help put things in perspective: You can see here that India (the enormous yellow blob) and Nigeria (the large light-orange blog that dominates western Africa) are the two countries that combine very large populations with low immunization rates. The Philippines, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Congo, and Ethiopia also seem like major problem spots

Tags:  medical, development.

Danielle Lip's insight:

When I viewed this map I was quite shocked to see that India had the highest amount of unvaccinated children in this world. The lack of finical stability could be a major factor for India, Nigeria and other locations such as Congo or Bangladesh. Instead of the news focusing on places with unvaccinated children such as California, who by the way is more stable than India. The news and government should take it upon themselves to help these countries since the priorities of the government right now are not being placed appropriately. This map gives a good perspective of how unvaccinated children are globally, not by showing numbers but rather showing by the size. The yellow blob ( India) should not be as enormous as it is, instead of funding and worrying about unnecessary places, the focus should be on helpless and unstable locations.

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, 24 March 2015, 04:50

Unit 2

Benjamin Hennig's map of the world displays the number of unimmunized children in the world. The larger the immunization rate, the smaller the country and the lower it is, the larger the country appears. Even though some parents in The United States are choosing  not to immunize their children, those numbers still have no comparison to those in Nigeria or India which are the largest due to lack of money and resources.

The use of different sizes to present the data is very helpful and makes it easy to determine the highest and lowest rates but a key for the countries would be helpful since they are so distorted. 

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African Slave Trade Video - Mankind The Story of All of Us - HISTORY.com

African Slave Trade Video - Mankind The Story of All of Us - HISTORY.com | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
Slavery became an industry for the first time in history when millions of African men and women were sold as slaves to Europeans.
Danielle Lip's insight:

In this video many doctors and professors from Maryland universities and other universities around the world talk about the African male and female slaves. Slavery as they state, " was not invented when the Europeans discovered Africa." Slavery can be as old as civilization and could have started anywhere.

The industrialization of slavery is still new to the world today and happened everywhere. It is crazy to think of how slavery was such a huge part of human history. 

This 4 minute video helped gain some knowledge about not just slavery of African men and women but how people would just receive and sell Africans based on supply and demand, many were willing to supply the people. It’s sad to think about how people would just want money and/ or power. Slavery was making the Africans not like humans anymore but just making them a “thing” not an actual human being. The whole idea of slavery to African’s is cruel and horrible to think about in my won opinion.

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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.
Danielle Lip's insight:

The Great Green Wall is not actually a wall nor is it green, this areas is very dry, having no negation or biodiversity. Yet eleven countries are banning together where this "wall" coexists and they place to help bring the native plants back to life. The eleven countries that this Great Wall is included in are the Sahel-Sahara region—Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Senegal. The focus area in these countries will become reproduced and the living conditions in these countries will grow and become full of life once again. I believe that it is very important to keep the environment alive and well because it makes for attractive living as well as a healthy life because oxygen comes from the plants and the air.

A point made in the article said that "We want to replicate and scale up these achievements across the region. It’s very possible to restore trees to a landscape and to restore agroforestrypractices without planting any trees." I liked this statement because it shows that the people in the countries are actually going to try and I find that very important. If you lived in one of the eleven countries would you want to live in a dried up area with no places or life?

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, 14 December 2015, 22:53

The great green wall initiative project, is a project which wants to plant tens of thousands of trees, roughly fifty thousand trees alone in Senegal. The point of this is to restore a failing  environment. Around five hundred million people are living in a desertification area. Both human and nature is at fault for this creation of a transition zone getting bigger and bigger, Humans are not necessarily taking care of the land like it should be taken care of and as for factors of nature such as climate change, drought and not enough rain. There are social impacts that may affect the area too, experts think that improvements in land and economy may help curb terrorism in Mali. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, 15 December 2015, 04:59

The great green wall is a way of separating the desert from the rain forest in Africa The Sahel is the area that separates the deforestation and the desert and would be a way to keep the desert in a different climatic region of the country.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, 17 December 2015, 19:40

this a great i think, the only way that countries in an area with such harsh environments can survive is by helping eachother and using their own beneficial land to help other and recieve help for their own deficiencies. 

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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.

Danielle Lip's insight:

When I was looking at these maps I came to realize that the continent of Africa is extremely diverse in which the countries in Africa are all different, showing different ethnicity's, races and cultures. There are many stereotypes about Africa talked about in this article such as "many African countries are highly developed, and others are rapidly urbanizing." This stereotype does not show the true diversity of each country in this continent, all the different people come together to make Africa an interesting and diverse place to live. I advise anyone who believes everyone in Africa is the same to look at these 3 maps in the article to understand the differences between the countries in this continent and the people who live there.

Also another fact that I found interesting in this article was that there are between 1,000-2,000 different languages spoken in Africa, if that does not show the diversity in this continent I don't know what would, since everyone is different the countries all bring something different to the table. Africa is just a big melting pot.

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 13:54

Africa is a very diverse and complicated continent due o mistakes made in the Berlin Conference. The strange boundaries drawn restrict these African nations to be one with their own people not with their enemies.

Chris Costa's curator insight, 27 October 2015, 20:51

We have seen the repercussions of ethnic tensions play out in the Balkans, the Middle East, and even in the United States, and Africa is no exception. Arbitrarily drawn national borders- the remnants of European colonialism- means that there is often significant ethnic diversity within many African nations. Although this creates interesting blends of language and culture, it has often bred violence in many countries, perhaps most notably in South Africa and Rwanda. Although many members of the West like to lump the entire continent into a single category, this could not be further from the truth. The second largest continent with extreme biodiversity, it has bred thousands of languages and hundreds of different cultural backgrounds, sometimes within a single country. It is important for the West to understand the complex make-up of the African continent in order to avoid the Eurocentric assumptions many Westerners make when discussing the continent. There isn't a single "Africa"- there isn't even a single "Nigeria," but rather a multitude of different peoples and cultures, equally as complex as those found in other regions of the world. This map does a very good job at illustrating the complexity and richness of the continent.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, 30 October 2015, 11:20

People often underestimate how diverse Africa really is. We often have the tendency to lump all Africans together in one large ethnic group. The actual number of different ethnic groups in Africa is rather staggering. This map can also be used as a partial explanation for the amount of ethnic conflict in Africa. Often times, these ethnic groups are squashed together in states with poorly drawn borders. Under that situation, ethnic conflict becomes inevitable.

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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.

Danielle Lip's insight:

It is extremely interesting to see how these volcanic islands are creating themselves, this article talks about how these islands are born and why they are being created. Countless eruptions are bringing these islands to above sea level, creating the island basically "below the waves." After each eruption occurs it seems that once the volcano hits the sea floor it starts to build upwards, being not only a volcano island but also a coral reef. Are there other volcanic islands enlarging around the world besides the ones already found? Rock is eventually turned into sand and the volcano underwater becomes dominant and still, where nothing is occurring and the sand begins to pile up, which goes to show how the island is building gradually. The sand can also slip as well as seen in the picture all the way to the right, where parts of the island sink in and the water takes over.

The volcanic islands that have been researched and found are Tahiti, Pinta which is a dry volcanic island, with dark lava flows staining its flanks and lastly is Maupiti whose tip is poking barely 213 meters above the sea.

It is crazy to think that such a geological formation can be created just by the sea alone, it is scary to think of what else could happen to this world, no one really knows and no one really will. I wonder what these volcanic islands will be like in a few years, if the same processes will occur or something new because as we know everything can change at the drop of a dime.

 

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, 2 December 2015, 20:30

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, pretty cool story on the formation of islands in the south Pacific. A couple of them look like the island visible from the beach in Rincon, Puerto Rico where I stayed. The island is one giant rock so nobody lives there and it's a naval base for the U.S. military. This, however, is a different situation when you realize that not only do people live here, but kind of a lot of people live here.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, 15 December 2015, 02:00

What causes the death and the caldera in a volcano? One thing that happens in a deceased volcano is the center of the volcano starts to either erode or the inside finally caves in. Once this happen a caldera takes shape and the ocean starts to take over. As the waves eat away at the shores it will eventually create a island that is shaped like a "U". After this happens that island will someday retreat back into the ocean and someday form a barrier reef.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, 15 December 2015, 03:52

Based on general knowledge, I know that the taller a volcano is, the younger it is and the shorter it is, the older it is. The reason they start to get short is from erosion. Hot spots in the Earth's crust make small islands from molten rock. Young islands can be very dangerous, because if they are inhabited, they have the possibility of erupting, whereas an old island does not since the volcano is lnactice and eroding. Over time the inactive volcano will crumble and a caldera will take shape and after even more time, that caldera will slip under the ocean and become a reef. 

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What Happens When a Hurricane Meets a Volcano?

What Happens When a Hurricane Meets a Volcano? | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
When Iselle crosses the Big Island of Hawaii, it will offer a rare glimpse at a clash of the titans

 

Tags: disasters, Oceania, physical, weather and climate.

Danielle Lip's insight:

While reading this article I felt as if I had no idea what to think since a volcano can affect a hurricane so much of vice versa, who would have thought that because a volcano cause the hurricane to worsen while a hurricane can cause a volcano to erupt with lava and volcanic gasses to escape. 

 The people in Hawaii must have to prepare for the worst because they really do not know what will happen because hurricanes rarely hit this specific area.Recently there was a 4.5 magnitude hurricane as stated in the article that people are assuming was cause by the hurricane. It is crazy to think that a hurricane can do so much damage to one place in such a short amount of time. it is also scary to think that just a tiny shift in pressure can cause the such a dramatic change in someone life, affecting their homes, lives and living conditions.

Hopefully this article is correct in saying "When it strikes its going to be ferocious, but as it passes over it’s going to be very disrupted,” said by Businger.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, 5 May 2015, 03:42

It seems as though the volcanos have more of an affect on hurricanes than vise versa.  It is interesting to watch these two natural forces come together and play off of each other in their natural state.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, 6 May 2015, 15:28

 

 What happens when a hurricane meets a volcano? Well according to Victoria Jaggard of Smithsonian.com when Hurrican Iselle crosses the big island volcano of Hawaii it will show us a clash of the titans. The scientists do not believe that the hurricane will cause eruption because previous storms and numerous amounts of rainfall has not affected the lava. I assume it will just evaporate when touching lava. Although gasses and particles could make phases of the hurricane more intense.

                This is interesting to see if a change in geography does really occurs when these 2 natural forces meet eachother. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, 7 May 2015, 17:20

This was very interesting because I did not realize that a hurricane can clash with a volcano. Hurricane Iselle traveled across Hawaii and clashes with the Kilauea volcano. Hurricanes rarely happen in Hawaii and this is why this was unexpected. Gases and particles from the volcano will make the hurricane worse and more intense. Heavy rain will occur but the volcanic activity may only add more lightening than anything. 

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In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers

In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
In western Myanmar a Chinese-backed energy and trading hub is taking shape on a remote island.

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, energy.

Danielle Lip's insight:

While reading this article I found it quite shocking to see that Myanmar is scrambling for energy, such as selling oil, this money is used in lanterns as a cheaper alternative to kerosene. People will do anything just to receive money and use it to help out their families. Money is not something easily  accessible and neither is energy.Yet, even though Myanmar is struggling right now, places such as Beijing still see Myanmar and Ramree Island as the main way to have safe and fast trade. 

The article also states that there are promising signs to China, and Southeast Asia to come back into the picture such as they are likely to have development that will focus on manufacturing in textiles and construction materials to help the country to gain power and energy back. 

The photographs in this article give for a good example of how China is striving for energy such as the women holding up the teapot that is considered to be a lamp with the use of oil. People in China are working hard and using different resources to serve as energy. Shouldn't people even out of China use up what they have and not be wasteful? 

Places in Southeast Asia can think of ways to gain energy, power and comfort because their whole motto on life is different than that of the United States of America.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, 17 December 2014, 22:29

With China making use of all its natural resources, I question how long will they last before running out of their resources and having to rely on other countries to supply them with something as basic as energy. Though I am overjoyed at the recent decline in gas prices, I am also concerned at what price countries such as China are selling their natural resources. Often times, it is the people living in villages that tend to pay for these consequences. It is from them that these resources are being extracted from and being massed produce to meet the needs of other countries. Before committing to projects that will meet the needs of other countries, they need to start making their people their number one priority.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, 2 December 2015, 02:05

this is where china grows at the expense of others. How are these people going to fight back? China is forced to do this because it wants to be the strongest nation in the world and as long as they are importing oil it relies on someone that can cut them off. And as long as they now are allowing the birth of two children the population growth in china is forcing china to expand and will do whatever means necessary to do so.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, 19 December 2015, 09:28

An interesting article that highlights important geographic disparities. The problem for Burma is that it has lagged behind in the world from its isolation. As a result when globalization such as the proposed trade zone in the article come about there is disastrous consequences. Unlike the west they are catching up and didn't have an adjusting period. Furthermore in China's race to keep its economy superior and out due America they have been going on wild spending sprees such as this deal to give them a global edge. Unfortunately this will leave many of the poor in Burma worse off than before. Plus their government will not likely help them because of their oppressive nature. Maybe all of this will create of revolution to give the Burmese freedom so that they can make these decisions for themselves as they enter the global community(also so they are not exploited as companies everywhere will likely be looking at its cheap labor and resources).

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Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung

Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it

"In the heart of Thailand’s most populous city, an oasis stands out from the urban landscape like a great “green lung.” That’s the nickname given to Bang Kachao—a lush protected area that has escaped the dense development seen elsewhere in Bangkok.  The city is built on the alluvial plain of the Chao Phraya River. Toward the southern end, near the Gulf of Thailand, is an old meander that never quite formed an oxbow lake. That meander traces the boundary of Bang Kachao, which TIME magazine once called the 'best urban oasis' in Asia.  According to a travel story in The New York Times, Bang Kachao is gaining popularity among tourists lured by bike tours, a floating farmers’ market, and the relaxed atmosphere."

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, remote sensing, land use, Thailand, Southeast Asia, urban ecology.

Danielle Lip's insight:

These pictures of the heart of Thailand is very interesting and intriguing because the viewer can get a view of what the city Bang Kachao really looks from a arial view. The researcher call Bang Kachao the green lung because the area looks like a lung as well as the meander that formed an oxbow lake. Every country. city has different landmarks that make the location their own such as Michigan whose borders look like a mitten. Bang Kachao is becoming larger and growing more and more in population such as tourists, farmers and bike tourers. This location has a relaxed atmosphere and the Landsat image gives it justice, showing its actual size as a city based on its location near the Chao Phraya River towards the Gulf of Thailand which allows for access to the gulf and other different trading advantages.

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Savannah Rains's curator insight, 27 May 2015, 06:51

This scoop shows an example of built environmental space. The highly urban and crowded Thailand has little green space. So why is this massive green park looking landmass there? Its a strictly environmental section of land to help water flow into the ocean. The people call it the "green lung" because its plants give off oxygen and provide a contrast from its urban sprawl. This article shows the importance that should be placed on having more strictly environmental places in big cities. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, 9 November 2015, 19:06

It's interesting to see the mixture of natural and manmade landscapes in this image. Humans have an enormous influence on the world around us- we have moved entire rivers for our own purposes, reshaped entire regions. In China, we have literally made it rain. Therefore, it's nice to see remnants of the rich environments that used to cover the urban sprawls of many of the world's largest cities, like Central Park in New York. Bang Kachao in Bangkok is another example of this, a reminder of the richness of the region before it was overwhelmed by the urban development that has characterized Bangkok over the previous century. The oasis serves as a valuable tourist attraction, as Westerners come to enjoy the bike trails and small farming community within Thailand's green lung. Leave it to hipsters to travel halfway across the globe just to enjoy nature within the confines of one of the world's largest cities. 

brielle blais's curator insight, 3 May 2018, 20:55
This showcases how important physical geography is. This "green lung" breaks up the high urbanized Bangkok. This helps the environment thrive and helps to cut down of emissions that affect climate change which is a problem in some areas. 
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Maeklong Railway Market

"Multi-purpose land use."

Danielle Lip's insight:

While watching this video I was very shocked and surprised, just because I know that if I was to visit and there was a train coming by at a veggie market I would not remain calm, cool and collected like the people shown in the video. Everyone has different customs in their lives and everyone makes use of their land differently, yes it is very unsanitary to have train tracks near food but that is definitely clever and a great source of space to do such a thing. The people in this video are aware of the train passing by and just pulls back their roofs back. The train tracks seem to be raised and the food underneath is not crushed, if it did get crushed people would be out of business and lose valuable money.

This system does not work in the United States because we are not using to trains passing by so casually, while in Thailand the people are accustomed to that life and go through the same procedure everyday. Traditions and customs are a part of daily life in all different places around the world, everyone lives differently and creates a specific life for themselves.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, 15 December 2015, 02:15
Definitely a good way for multi-purpose land use. They are utilizing the space they have conservatively, they really nailed this one on the head coming up with an idea to put a market right on a railroad track. Is this concept even safe or sanitary? Most definitely not. First off, it is not sanitary because that train on a daily basis has gone through all sorts of dirt and the train is literally passing right over the farmer's food that he is still going to sell to customers. Also, probably not the safest, because the people are just inches away from the passing train and with the wrong move, they can possibly fall onto the track and they are dead. I will hand it to them though, they act in an orderly fashion and move swiftly both when it comes and when it leaves. As a matter of fact, they go on with life so well after it leaves, it is almost like the train never passed through in the first place.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, 2 May 2018, 07:57
In one video we see issues surrounding urban development, city planning (or lack thereof), population density, and land use, among other topics. As more and more people move into Southeast Asia's unplanned cities, there will be more crowding and people will have to use every last available inch of land, even if that means going right up to the train tracks. This is a culture shock to people in the West, where most land is single-use only.
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, 3 May 2018, 17:16
Urban planning in a rapidly urbanizing area can be difficult, but in this area two very different urban entities use the land together so beautifully. This market was built around the train tracks and when the train passes through at a slow speed the market clears the tracks and both work together so flawlessly. This is uncommon for us to see because many cities in America had room to grow and expand and had ample planning time because urbanization happened much slower than it is in Asia, with urbanization happening so fast the countries need to use their space flexibly. 
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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."

Danielle Lip's insight:

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, 24 March 2015, 03:40

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, 17 December 2015, 22:17

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.

David Stiger's curator insight, 29 October 2018, 00:56
I think it's fair to say that people in general take maps for granted. The devotion and reverence for the written word - specifically the published written word - prevents people from realizing that much of the world is a social construct. Geographically, borders are social constructs - sometimes loose agreements between different groups of people to establish territorial boundaries in order to claim resources. This video, which speaks to the complicated reality of territorial enclaves and 'exclaves,' illustrates how borders are social constructs. They can often be illogical, awkward, and highly disputable. Examining the several exclaves and enclaves shared between Armenia and Azerbaijan is evidence of the geopolitical mess that disputed borders create.  What is most fascinating about this case is the assessment of how Joseph Stalin tampered with international borders as a geopolitical strategy in order to sow instability and weakness. This strategy allowed the the Soviets to more easily conquer and subjugate foreign peoples - all in the name of proletariat revolution. 
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China building 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea

China building 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
The scale of China's land reclamation in the South China Sea is leading to "serious questions" on its intentions, a top US official says.

 

China is building artificial land by pumping sand on to live coral reefs - some of them submerged - and paving over them with concrete. China has now created over 4sq/km (1.5 sq miles) of artificial landmass.  China is creating a great wall of sand with dredges and bulldozers over the course of months.

 

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, East Asia.

Danielle Lip's insight:

Pumping in sand to cover coral reef and create more land is a very inventive way to make new territory, using concrete and placing bulldozers and other machinery is helping China gain more land and gain more access in the South China Sea yet this who pumping is making people question and causing places such as the Philippines to  file complaints saying they will not be associated with the whole plan that China has. Why is China exactly pumping sand and spreading concrete over the live coral reefs? Does China know they are killing live animals and plants underneath the sea? 

While looking into the matter I found that China believed the whole act of reclaiming land to be "entirely within China's sovereignty and are totally justifiable". Now people all over the world are focused on land and power, not about other social matters. This land pumping is not only causing conflict but it is creating more opportunity to better work and living conditions.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, 3 April 2015, 13:54

Geopolitical Terraforming?

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, 3 April 2015, 15:45

In addition to the original BBC article, here is another article from the Telegraph with some aerial imagery showing the extent of this geo-engineering project.  This has plenty of geopolitical implications and the United States government is on record saying that it is "concerned."

Bob Beaven's curator insight, 16 April 2015, 19:41

China is a large and powerful nation that is not afraid of flexing military muscle to its smaller neighbors.  The developments of China building artificial land to strengthen its claim in the region shows how determined the country is to have its claims honored.  It also shows that China will stop at nothing to have regions were resources could be to aid in the countries economic growth.  However, China is causing a great deal of controversy through its actions.  Also, China's neighbors are becoming increasingly frustrated with the large nation, yet they are all much smaller nations that really can't prevent the Chinese from doing what they want, especially with China declaring it won't listen to what the UN has to say.  China is a country that is not afraid of strongman politics to get what it wants.

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Key facts and figures about India's population

Key facts and figures about India's population | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
India will soon have the largest, youngest workforce ever. Learn some of the most important facts about India’s youthful population.
Danielle Lip's insight:

Knowing facts and figures about India as well as any of place on the globe is important, India has approximately 1.27 billion residents with a fertility rate for women of about 2.5 children. It is crazy to think that the core population is of children between the ages of 0-13, this is why India will soon have the largest youngest work force. 

Some interesting facts found in this article were that people in India is the largest user of ground water as well as having a growing population. With the work age being so young many people have trouble publicly as well as having troubles with sanitary needs. Having such a high population with young children leads to troubles in the society.

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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.

Danielle Lip's insight:

Just by reading the four possible answers to the question " Which statement is true?" I was horrified to even thing about should horrible living conditions. 

Once I opened the page I read in depth about each possible answer, in this case all the answers are true statements.mThe fact that their is a toilet problem can cause more deaths and illnesses in families because as the passage states "people defecate in fields and other places where poor children also play." This gross act can cause children likely problems as one could guess. India all around has a bad sanitary problem even worse than China.  

From statement D, there was a statement saying " Because 130 million of India’s households lack toilets, women and girls often have no other option than to venture out — often at night and alone — to relieve themselves." The fact that women get raped and hurt during times to "relieve" themselves is just horrible to think about! The fact that people who live in India must endure such tortuous conditions just to do a daily task that everyone does due to the poverty level and how low the development is in India. 

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Chris Costa's curator insight, 15 November 2015, 19:18

I was unpleasantly surprised to learn that all these statements are indeed true. Reading about the struggles India has endured with the lack of indoor plumbing many of its people must endure made me think of a previous article I had read about the "Two Mexico's." Rapid development in certain areas for certain people has revolutionized the standard of living for some, but the persistence of corruption has lead to economic lag for many of the people of both nations, meaning significant portions of the population are being left behind during this period of development. The sanitation and plumbing systems of inca are woefully inadequate for a country of over a billion people, subtracting from the leaps that have been made in other areas. The dangers faced by women as a result of the lack of indoor plumbing was a surprise, although it does make sense. Millions of Indian women have to resort to walking to communal bathrooms, oftentimes at night on solitary trips, which leaves them vulnerable to the kids of sexual assault that have plagued Indian media. I hope for the sake of the Indian people that improvements in the rates of indoor plumbing in the country continue to be made.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, 14 December 2015, 19:46

One thing about this issue is the fact that most of the people living in the area dont have the proper sanitation. Many of the issues that they face are a lack of government and funding and jobs. However the issue in India is the worst within the world. China has a huge lack of sanitation but in India the situation is much worse.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, 14 December 2015, 23:38
Something like this just disgusts me, first off there are more cell phones in this country than toilets... how does a government allow that to happen? Clearly, the answer is, they must not care because there is lack of governmental help. These people do not have toilets in there houses, they have to go down the street to a public restroom where thousands of people go a day both sick and healthy, so there are probably terrible sicknesses running rampant. Hopefully for them, they do not get a life threatening disease that will kill off the population.
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A liter of acid can destroy someone's life

A liter of acid can destroy someone's life | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
Almost 10 years ago, a young Pakistani woman was held down by her mother-in-law while her husband and father-in-law threw acid on her. Some 150 operations later, Bushra Shafi is working as a beautician in a hair salon in Lahore, started by a hairdresser who was moved to help victims of acid attacks when one of them came into her salon and asked simply: "Can you make me beautiful again?"
 
Danielle Lip's insight:

When I read this article I found that violence that this women encountered was very uncalled for and unnecessary. If violence like this happened daily then why doesn't someone do something about it? This woman did not deserve what her mother-in-law, husband and father-in-law did to her by throwing acid on her. If this is allowed in Pakistan then I can only imagine how their government is run.

 Yes this violent act was taken place in a affluent neighborhood but money does not matter when it comes this neighborhood apparently. Another interesting fact is that acid is only a dollar... a dollar that could destroy someone's life within minutes.

 

One of the doctor's stated "She said she expected two or three women but the first day, she had 42 women come through her door who were acid attack victims." This violent act placed on women is not acceptable and probably shows the country that women are weak and men are strong. Pakistan must still have gender racism based on this story.

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, 24 April 2015, 16:19

It is absolutely mind-boggling how any human being could do something like this to a fellow human.  What is even more sad is how the Pakistani government essentially treats it as a non-issue with very few prosecutions of the perpetrators.  But luckily this sad story has a silver-lining.  A salon owner has opened her doors to acid-victims, not only to try and fix their scars, but also by employing them as beauticians.  It's a sad and evil story that has spawned a very positive and beautiful situation.  We need more people like the salon owner in this world.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, 18 November 2015, 17:57

Does this have to do with the Dowry? Is this the area where the brides family pays the grooms family so the brides family gets rid of her and the grooms family gets her so the brides family pays installments and if the installments are not fulfilled then there are accidental fires. This was not accidental though but I wonder if the installments were met.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, 20 November 2015, 21:43

The BBC's Shaimaa Khalil thought she knew the "typical" victim of an acid attack in Pakistan. "I think before I spoke to women who were victims of acid attacks, it was easy for me to generalize and assume they were from poorer backgrounds and largely uneducated," she says.....

It so easy to paint a whole culture with a broad brush but once again these attacks do not define their culture. This article with all its sadness had such a positive message of hope and survivial.

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10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project

10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
Here are 10 facts about poverty in Africa that demonstrate the widespread consequences of poverty that affect education, health, food consumption and more.
Danielle Lip's insight:

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name the location there is most likely poverty in that area somewhere yet people do not always know the true facts about poverty so I decided to look up and read about the poverty in Africa.

The Borgen Project is a nonprofit organization working towards getting rid of hunger and starvation and these 10 facts about Africa are founded by their project. 

Some of the interesting and upsetting facts that I found in this article were that "Approximately one in three people living in sub-Saharan Africa are undernourished." I can not imagine not having food waiting for me for dinner or just a quick snack. Another fact that I found quite controversial would be "Women in sub-Saharan Africa are over 230 times more likely to die during childbirth or pregnancy than women in North America." This is some upsetting because women are always told to have numerous amounts of children to help the work rate as well as population.  Poverty in Africa is not something to joke about and the fact that Borgen is trying to fix the problem is fascinating. 

This article is important to read and I suggest for people to read it especially if they are going to learn about Africa specifically sub-Saharan Africa because the sub-Saharan Africa is talked about in many of the facts.

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | Danielle's Geography 200 Portfolio | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.
Danielle Lip's insight:

Today these are still people who are racist in a way towards people of color, a sentence in this article states "people of color — were inherently less intelligent than northern Europeans with light-colored skin." Thinking that someone is less intelligent because of the skin color is very rude and unintelligent in a way. 

This article is describing how Africa is believed to be dirty, so that is how the Ebola virus was brought to the United States. A group of scientists proved that this is invalid. Ebola is caused by bushmeat and there is no chance of bush meat smuggling could bring Ebola to America. The whole Ebola case goes to show that Africa is still seen as dirty and unsanitary. This article is not focused primarily on Ebola but how the case showed how Africa is viewed in others eyes.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, 9 April 2015, 19:21

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, 27 October 2015, 20:37

Those who deny the continued influence of racism in our society are blinding themselves to the truth. Contemporary influences of the racism that plagued the preceding centuries are still found in most major media depictions of Africa. The Ebola epidemic has served to highlight the bigotry that plagues Western media, as the assumption that all of Africa is diseased and dirty is continuously perpetuated (when, in reality, Ebola only affected a very small part of the continent). Africa is presented as "other," a backwards continent that is in desperate need of Western help and guidance- in what was is that different from the European colonizers who also viewed their actions as benevolent attempts to "civilize" the uncivilized? That mindset has not left Western circles, and yet we continue to pat ourselves on the back and congratulate ourselves for suddenly being so tolerant. The insensitivity of Western audiences to the concerns of black individuals both at home and in Africa related to the prevalence of racism highlights how determined mainstream media is to deny the existence of a problem. Until we recognize the Eurocentrism that continues to plague our media and make the necessary moves to correct the practice, harmful depictions of Africa will continue to loom large in Western media and in the opinions of many Europeans and Americans alike.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, 30 October 2015, 11:12

Africa has long been treated by the western media as a dark , brutish, uncivilized place. Africa is a place were people starve and murder each other in large numbers. There is so much more to Africa than the picture I just described. The problem is, many people just do not accept the existence of a culturally complex Africa. That narrative would destroy the traditional  darker narrative of the past 500 years. A narrative grounded in the beliefs that blacks are inherently inferior beings. During the Ebola crises, the calls to cut off travel to Africa were quick and demanding. Had the crises been in England, would those same calls have been so loud? I think we all can guess the answer  to that question. Much progress has been made, but we still need to change our cultural depiction of Africa.