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Applied Network Science

Applied Network Science | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

The journal Applied Network Science is intended to focus on applied research benefiting from or using network science. The breadth of areas where network science is being used continues to increase and is far from reaching its peak. Annual meetings on network science continue to attract a diverse crowd—from physicists to urban planners; from computer scientists to art historians. These works contribute to the body of knowledge of applications which can benefit from network science.
We have set the scope of this journal to be on “applied” work exactly to highlight the multi- and inter-disciplinary aspects of the journal. We encourage contributions from diverse fields as long as the contributions are not solely theoretical. Papers should clearly indicate how the concepts proposed can be applied to practical, real-world problems. Note that we are open to papers with theoretical results, but there should be a clear indication in the body of the work about the applied impact of the proposed theory.
Our first submissions are currently being reviewed and we expect a quick turn-around. Many other submissions are being prepared. We invite you to submit your work to demonstrate the world-wide applicability of network science.

 

Hocine Cherifi and Ronaldo Menezes
Editors-in-Chief

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Postdoc Position in Large-Scale Traffic Simulation and Swarm Intelligence for Smart Cities

Postdoc Position in Large-Scale Traffic Simulation and Swarm Intelligence for Smart Cities | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

Research at the Professorship of Computational Social Science (COSS) is focused on:
* bringing modelling and computer simulation of social processes and transportation phenomena together with technology, experimental, and data-driven work,
* combining the perspectives of different scientific disciplines (e.g., social science, computer science, complexity science and sociophysics),
* bridging fundamental and applied for work,
* developing digital tools to support people and studying the resulting behaviour.

More at: www.jobs.ethz.ch

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Self-organization in Pedestrian and Traffic Systems and Logistics MOOC

•Content: 3 Modules, each consisting of several videos
•Estimated: 4 work weeks, 1h per week
•Self-​paced, progress at your own speed
•No cost to enrol
•Subject: Computer Science, Traffic Systems, Social Science
•Level: Introductory
•Language: English
•Target groups: Students, citizen scientists, politicians, journalists, researchers of different fields
(urban planners, architects, computer scientists)
•Recommended Reading: Helbing, Dirk. Next Civilization: Digital Democracy and Socio-​Ecological Finance-​How to Avoid Dystopia and Upgrade Society by Digital Means. Springer
Nature, 2021

Read the full article at: coss.ethz.ch

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Calls for the 2022 CSS Emerging Researcher, Junior, and Senior Scientific Awards

The Complex Systems Society announces the ninth edition of the CSS Scientific Awards. 

The CSS Emerging Researcher Award recognizes promising researchers in Complex Systems within 3 years of PhD completion.

The Junior Scientific Award is aimed at recognizing excellent scientific record of young researchers within 10 years of PhD completion.

The senior scientific award will recognize outstanding contributions of Complex Systems scholars at whatever stage of their careers.

Deadline: May 31st, 2022.

More at: cssociety.org

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Adaptive Computing, open online course

Adaptive Computing, open online course | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
Prof. Carlos Gershenson
Complex systems are characterized by interactions that may generate novel information. This information can change problems, so previous solutions become obsolete. To face complexity, we need adaptation. In this course, we will cover different methods for building systems that can adapt to unforeseen changes.
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:00-11:30 AM, Mexico City Time.
First Class: February 1st, 2022.
The class is open and free for all students worldwide. 
Those who deliver successfully coursework and final project will receive a certificate.

Details at: ac.gershenson.mx

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Autopoiesis: Foundations of Life, Cognition, and Emergence of Self/Other - Call for papers - BioSystems

The special issue “Autopoiesis: Foundations of Life, Cognition, and Emergence of Self/Other” is devised to host an interdisciplinary forum on scientific research based on autopoiesis and its role for undestanding life, cognition, the emergence of self/other, and related issues. It is open to various approaches, targets, and goals, all having autopoiesis as common denominator, sharing and applying its core concepts to face novel problems, perspectives, and activities.

We suggest interested Authors to manifest their interest by contacting the special issue Editors, providing a title and (preferably) an extended abstract (around 500 words) about the topic they intend to approach and other methodological details before May 31, 2022.

More at: www.journals.elsevier.com

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GESDA Science Breakthrough Radar

GESDA Science Breakthrough Radar | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

The 2021 GESDA Science Breakthrough Radar provides an overview of science trends and breakthrough predictions at 5, 10 and 25 years in 24 science and technology areas, a synthesis of the related fundamental debates in society, and an exploration of opportunities for concerted action through initial contributions on the implications for international affairs, global challenges, and the SDGs.

Read the full article at: radar.gesda.global

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Origins of Life, MOOC @ SFI's Complexity Explorer

Origins of Life, MOOC @ SFI's Complexity Explorer | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

Lead instructors: Sarah Maurer and Chris Kempes

This course aims to push the field of Origins of Life research forward by bringing new and synthetic thinking to the question of how life emerged from an abiotic world.

This course begins by examining the chemical, geological, physical, and biological principles that give us insight into origins of life research. We look at the chemical and geological environment of early Earth from the perspective of likely environments for life to originate.

Taking a look at modern life we ask what it can tell us about the origin of life by winding the clock backwards. We explore what elements of modern life are absolutely essential for life, and ask what is arbitrary? We ponder how life arose from the huge chemical space and what this early 'living chemistry' may have looked like.

We examine phenomena, that may seem particularly life like, but are in fact likely to arise given physical dynamics alone. We analyze what physical concepts and laws bound the possibilities for life and its formation.

Insights gained from modern evolutionary theory will be applied to proto-life. Once life emerges, we consider how living systems impact the geosphere and evolve complexity. 

The study of Origins of Life is highly interdisciplinary - touching on concepts and principles from earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics.  With this we hope that the course can bring students interested in a broad range of fields to explore how life originated. 

The course will make use of basic algebra, chemistry, and biology but potentially difficult topics will be reviewed, and help is available in the course discussion forum and instructor email. There will be pointers to additional resources for those who want to dig deeper.

This course is a Complexity Explorer Frontiers Course.  The goals of a Frontiers Course are to share the excitement and uncertainty of a scientific area, inspire curiosity, and possibly draw new people into the research community who can help this research area take shape.

More at: www.complexityexplorer.org

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CSS Junior Scientific Award 2021

The CSS promotes the Junior Scientific Award to recognize the excellence in the scientific career of young researchers in Complex Systems. It is awarded once a year to a maximum of two young researchers (up to ten years after PhD completion) who have achieved outstanding results in complexity science in any of the areas representative of the CSS.

Read the full article at: cssociety.org

bindgrove's comment, May 19, 2021 12:15 AM
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Research Fellows in Cultural Data Analytics @ Tallinn University | CUDAN Open Lab

Tallinn University seeks to hire two Research Fellows in Cultural Data Analytics, particularly in (1) Audiovisual Machine Learning, and (2) Cultural Dynamics, to work on ambitious, high-impact research at the CUDAN ERA Chair (chair holder Prof. Dr. Maximilian Schich). Start of the employment contract: 01.07.- 01.09.2021, duration of the contract is up to 31.12.2023. Deadline of submitting the application documents is 31st May, 2021.

Read the full article at: cudan.tlu.ee

theactherapist's comment, May 5, 2021 6:44 AM
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Complex Systems Society Seminars

Complex Systems Society Seminars | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it


We created a calendar to aggregate seminars and events from and for members of the Complex Systems Society

Please share and subscribe. You can access it here, or in iCal format.

If you would like to add events to this calendar, please send me an email.

signaturelogo's comment, May 18, 2021 8:29 AM
GOOD
bindgrove's comment, May 19, 2021 12:15 AM
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Collective Intelligence

Collective Intelligence | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

Collective Intelligence is a transdisciplinary journal devoted to advancing the theoretical and empirical understanding of group performance in diverse systems, from adaptive matter to cellular and neural systems to animal societies to all types of human organizations to hybrid AI-human teams and nanobot swarms.

Editors-in-Chief: Jessica Flack, Panos Ipeirotis, Scott E Page & Geoff Mulgan

https://dl.acm.org/journal/colint 

carsnu's comment, April 22, 2021 6:59 AM
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Isqancom12's comment, April 22, 2021 11:52 PM
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The Nobel Prize in Physics 2020

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
Three Laureates share this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics for their discoveries about one of the most exotic phenomena in the universe, the black hole. Roger Penrose showed that the general theory of relativity leads to the formation of black holes. Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez discovered that an invisible and extremely heavy object governs the orbits of stars at the centre of our galaxy. A supermassive black hole is the only currently known explanation.
Isqancom12's comment, April 22, 2021 11:52 PM
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Entropy | Special Issue : Complexity and Evolution

The understanding of evolutionary processes is one the most important issues of scientific enquiry of this century. Scientific thinking in twentieth century witnessed the overwhelming power of the evolutionary paradigm. It not only solidified the foundations of diverse areas such as cell biology, ecology, and economics, but also fostered the development of several mathematical and computational tools to model and simulate how evolutionary processes take place.

Besides the application of the evolutionary paradigm and the discovery of the evolutionary features for diverse processes, there is another interesting aspect which touches upon the emergence of novel evolutionary processes. Generally, the emergence of an evolutionary process requires a complex transition between a prior form where no evolutionary process is undergoing and a posterior form where the evolutionary process has been triggered. Most advanced methods to understand the emergence of evolutionary processes require the consideration of systemic features such as self-organization, resilience, and contextuality, among others.

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What’s love got to do with it? From ‘survival of the fittest’ to compassionate connection [online course]

What’s love got to do with it? From ‘survival of the fittest’ to compassionate connection [online course] | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

Richard A. Watson

A program for Earth Literacies

May 17th to June 7th, 2022

Why are we fighting and exploiting each other? And why are we destroying the planet’s natural resources and the balance of the global ecosystems we ourselves depend on? How do we treat each other and the biosphere with more kindness and compassion?

This course seeks to bring together the ideas of this new science and these worldviews to relieve the tension between self-interest and our impact on one another and the world around us. The focus will be both on presented material and what we can learn from each other to move into compassionate connection. The taught material will include slide presentations, with break-out room exercises, and opportunities to share reflections and to learn from one another in group discussion – and if Im feeling suitably brave and vulnerable, maybe a little guided visualisation to ‘feel into’ and invite the worldview we choose, and our role in it.

More information at: www.richardawatson.com

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Entropy | Special Issue: Recent Advances in Guided Self-Organization

Examples of self-organising systems can be found practically everywhere: a heated fluid forms regular convection patterns of Bénard cells, neuronal ensembles self-organise into complex spike patterns, a swarm changes its shape in response to an approaching predator, ecosystems develop spatial structures in order to deal with diminishing resources, and so on.

Typically, self-organisation (SO) is defined as the evolution of a system into an organised form in the absence of external pressures. SO within a system brings about several attractive properties, in particular robustness, adaptability, and scalability. Consequently, a natural question to ask would be: Is it possible to guide the process of self-organisation towards some desirable patterns and outcomes? Over the last decades, it has become apparent that this question can be rigorously formalised across multiple domains, leading to the emergence of a new research field: Guided Self-Organisation (GSO). This has led to theoretical developments in information theory, network theory, dynamical systems, game theory, systems biology, and sociophysics, as well as practical applications in artificial intelligence, synthetic biology, unconventional computation, distributed robotics, and active matter.

More at: www.mdpi.com

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Researcher position at the intersection between Social Complexity and Cooperative AI - FBK

FBK-CHuB is seeking a Researcher in the field of the analysis and modelling of complex social systems.
In particular, the candidate will be involved in a research project focused on the modelling of the interaction between human and artificial agents in complex social scenarios. The work will include the exploration of the interaction of different typologies of actors, artificial or natural, acting following different goals and strategies in paradigmatical complex social scenarios such as ant colonies, flocks of birds or interaction models on networks, as well as in more realistic scenarios such as online communication (bots) or traffic (self-driving cars).

More at: jobs.fbk.eu

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Open Call – Conference Complex Systems (CCS 2023)

The Complex Systems Society (CSS) organizes every year a main conference (CCS) - the most important annual meeting for the complex systems research community.

The Complex Systems Society invites bids to host CCS2023.

The conference is generally held in September/October of each year.

The deadline for proposals submission is March 15, 2022.

Read the full article at: cssociety.org

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Courses: SFI Complexity Interactive | Santa Fe Institute

Courses: SFI Complexity Interactive | Santa Fe Institute | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

SFI Complexity Interactive (SFI-CI) combines the dynamic interactions of an in-person course with the flexibility to learn from anywhere in the world. This three-week, part-time, online course offers participants a theory- and applications-based view of complexity science. Complexity Interactive provides a foundation for thinking broadly about complex systems, encouraging participants to explore syntheses across systems in an open dialog with SFI faculty. The program's size is limited to ensure everyone has ample opportunity to discuss with faculty and with each other.

In 2022, the curriculum will explore scaling, robustness, and feedbacks, with a particular focus on sustainability and climate change.

More at: www.santafe.edu

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The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2021

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2021 | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

This year’s Laureates – David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens – have provided us with new insights about the labour market and shown what conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments. Their approach has spread to other fields and revolutionised empirical research.

Many of the big questions in the social sciences deal with cause and effect. How does immigration affect pay and employment levels? How does a longer education affect someone’s future income? These questions are difficult to answer because we have nothing to use as a comparison. We do not know what would have happened if there had been less immigration or if that person had not continued studying.

However, this year’s Laureates have shown that it is possible to answer these and similar questions using natural experiments. The key is to use situations in which chance events or policy changes result in groups of people being treated differently, in a way that resembles clinical trials in medicine.

Using natural experiments, David Card has analysed the labour market effects of minimum wages, immigration and education. His studies from the early 1990s challenged conventional wisdom, leading to new analyses and additional insights. The results showed, among other things, that increasing the minimum wage does not necessarily lead to fewer jobs. We now know that the incomes of people who were born in a country can benefit from new immigration, while people who immigrated at an earlier time risk being negatively affected. We have also realised that resources in schools are far more important for students’ future labour market success than was previously thought.

Data from a natural experiment are difficult to interpret, however. For example, extending compulsory education by a year for one group of students (but not another) will not affect everyone in that group in the same way. Some students would have kept studying anyway and, for them, the value of education is often not representative of the entire group. So, is it even possible to draw any conclusions about the effect of an extra year in school? In the mid-1990s, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens solved this methodological problem, demonstrating how precise conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments.

“Card’s studies of core questions for society and Angrist and Imbens’ methodological contributions have shown that natural experiments are a rich source of knowledge. Their research has substantially improved our ability to answer key causal questions, which has been of great benefit to society,” says Peter Fredriksson, chair of the Economic Sciences Prize Committee.

Read the full article at: www.nobelprize.org

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CSS Senior Scientific Award 2021

The CSS promotes the Senior Scientific Award to recognize the scientific career of Complex Systems scholars. It is awarded once a year to members who have achieved outstanding results in complexity science in any of the areas representative of the CSS.

Read the full article at: cssociety.org

krishnatraining's comment, May 8, 2021 3:02 AM
nice
signaturelogo's comment, May 18, 2021 8:29 AM
NICE
cowboyintolerant's comment, May 19, 2021 4:39 AM
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CSS Emerging Researcher Award


This year the CSS launches a new award. The CSS Emerging Researcher Award recognizes promising researchers in Complex Systems. It is awarded once a year to up to two researchers who have made outstanding first steps in the complexity science research in any of the areas representative of the CSS.

Read the full article at: cssociety.org

signaturelogo's comment, May 18, 2021 8:29 AM
NICE
bindgrove's comment, May 19, 2021 12:15 AM
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Systems Science Program - now available fully online | Binghamton University

Systems Science Program - now available fully online | Binghamton University | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

Binghamton’s Systems Science graduate program is now officially registered by the New York State Education Department as a Distance Education program. You can complete your advanced degree in Systems Science (Master’s, PhD) fully online from anywhere in the world.

More at: www.binghamton.edu

borealisbikescanada's comment, April 17, 2021 7:40 AM
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carsnu's comment, April 22, 2021 6:58 AM
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Entropy | Special Issue : What is Self-Organization?

Many of us have used the notion of “self-organization” in our studies. What is it precisely, though? A constituent element could be, e.g., the emergence of non-trivial properties from comparatively simple rules. What would simple, non-trivial or complex emergence mean in this context?

In this Special Issue, we invite viewpoints, perspectives, and applied considerations on questions regarding the notions of self-organization and complexity. Examples include:

Routes: In how many different ways can self-organization manifest itself? Would it be meaningful, or even possible, to attempt a classification?

Detection: Can we detect it automatically—either the process or the outcome? Or do we need a human observer to classify a system as “self-organizing”? This issue may be related to the construction of quantifiers, e.g., in terms of functions on phase space, such as entropy measures.

Complexity: Is a system self-organizing only when the resulting dynamical state is “complex”? What does “complex” mean exact;ly? Are there many types of complexity, or just a single one? E.g., it has never been settled whether complexity should be intensive or extensive, if any.

Domains: Where do we find self-organizing processes? Are the properties of self-organizing systems domain-specific or universal? In which class of systems does self-organization show up most clearly?

Prof. Dr. Claudius Gros
Dr. Damián H. Zanette
Guest Editors


Read more at: www.mdpi.com

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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna have discovered one of gene technology’s sharpest tools: the CRISPR/Cas9 genetic scissors. Using these, researchers can change the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with extremely high precision. This technology has had a revolutionary impact on the life sciences, is contributing to new cancer therapies and may make the dream of curing inherited diseases come true.
lauthinvestigations's comment, March 1, 2021 6:31 AM
GOOD
carsnu's comment, April 22, 2021 6:59 AM
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The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2020 | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
This year’s Nobel Prize is awarded to three scientists who have made a decisive contribution to the fight against blood-borne hepatitis, a major global health problem that causes cirrhosis and liver cancer in people around the world.

Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton and Charles M. Rice made seminal discoveries that led to the identification of a novel virus, Hepatitis C virus. Prior to their work, the discovery of the Hepatitis A and B viruses had been critical steps forward, but the majority of blood-borne hepatitis cases remained unexplained. The discovery of Hepatitis C virus revealed the cause of the remaining cases of chronic hepatitis and made possible blood tests and new medicines that have saved millions of lives.
kidieez's comment, January 22, 2021 4:49 AM
nice